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Publication numberUS749104 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1904
Filing dateFeb 18, 1903
Publication numberUS 749104 A, US 749104A, US-A-749104, US749104 A, US749104A
InventorsL. F. Schoenefeldt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concentrator
US 749104 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 749,104. PATENTED JAN. 5, 1904.

Y L. F. SGHOENEFELDT.

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v UNITED STATES Patented January 5, 1904.

PATENT OFFICE.

LUDWIG FREDRICK SCHOENEFELDT, OF DENVER, COLORADO,.ASSIGNOR OF TWO-THIRDS TO ROCKWELL M. MAGCORMAC, OF DENVER, COLORADO.

CONCENTRATO R.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 749,104, dated January 5, 1904. Application filed February 18, 1903. Serial No. 143,967. (No model.)

T 00 whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, LUDWIG FREDRICK SCHOENEFELDT,a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Denver, in the county of Denver and State of Colorado, have invented a new and Improved Concentrator, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to improvements in concentrators or machines for separating the values from dry crushed ores, dry gravel, and dry sand, an object being to provide a concentrator operating by centrifugal action that shall be light, strong, and durable, easily operated, and that while taking up a very little space will provide for a large output.

Further objects of theinvention will appear in the general description.

I will describe a concentrator embodying my invention and then point out the novel features in the appended claims.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the figures.

Figure l is a sectional elevation of a concentrator embodying my invention. Fig. 2 is a section on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation of oneof the separatiug-cups employed, and Fig. 4 is a sectional view showing a modification of the cup-rotating mechanism.

Referring to the drawings, 5 designates a standard or base from which a fixed shaft 6 5 extendsupward. Adriving-shaft 7, operated from any desired source of power, has abeariug in the standard 5, and on this shaft is a bevel-gear 8, meshing with a bevel-gear 9, rotating on the shaft 6 and on the upper end 0 of the standard 5. 'Attached to this bevelgear 9 is a table 10, carrying a series of gearwheels 11. As here shown, four of these gear-wheels are mounted to rotate on the upper side of the table, and the several gearwheels 11 mesh with a gear 12, fixed to the shaft 6 above the table. Also supported from the table by standards 12 and having a bearing on the shaft 6 is a hopper 13, which preferably has a conical bottom 14 for directing 5o material to the tubes 15, which convey said material to the cups 16. Each cup is' substantially hemispherical and has an outlettube 17 extended from its lower portion. These outlet-tubes also form the axes of the cups, as the several tubes have bearings in rings 18 and 19, surrounding the table 10 and supported therefrom by means of arms 20. At the inner end of each tube is a sieve material 21, which will permit the outlet of the heavy values. 60..

On the tube 17 of each cup between the rings 18 and 19 is a band-wheel 22, and on the spindles of the gears 11 are pulleys 23, from which bands 24 extend to the pulleys 22.. It may be here stated that while there are four gear-wheels 11, and consequently four pulleys 23, there will be a very much greater number of cups 16. I have here shown twenty-fourof these cups, and the cups are arranged in sets of six, the six cups of 7c the set being operated from a pulley Each pulley 23 is provided with three annular channels, and from each channel a band 24 passes around the pulleys 22 of two adjacent cups, as clearly illustrated in Fig. 2.

In the example of my improvement shown in Fig. 4 a table 25 is arranged to, rotate with a gear 26, and carried by this table are spindles 27, on which are bevel-gears 28 and also band-pulleys 29. The gears 28 are 8o engaged by bevel-pinions 30 on the outer ends of shafts 31, carried on the table, and the inner ends of the shafts are provided with bevel-pinions 32, engaging with a fixed bevel gear or rack 33. In this construction the bands will pass from the pulleys 29 to the pulleys connected to the cups, and obviously as the table 25 is rotated the several pulleys 29 will also be rotated on their axes, imparting rotary motion to the cup. 0

In the operation the crushed ore, sand, or gravel containing gold or other values and while in a dry state will be placed in the hopper 13. While the machine is in motion, the material will pass through the tubes 15 into 5 the cups 16, and as these cups are rotated on their axes the heavy matter or values will be thrown outward against theiuner sides of the cups by centrifugal action and the ores, owing to the particular shape of the cups, too will gravitate to the screens 2i and pass out through the tubes 17 and be collected in a suitable receiver arranged underneath the tubes. The tailings or like material will be discharged over the tops of the cups.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent- 1. A concentrator, comprising a series of cups, a rotary part carrying the cups, outlettubes extending from the bottoms of the cups and having rotative hearings in said rotary part, means for imparting rotary motion to the cups, a hopper, and conveyers for material, leading from the hopper to the several cups.

2. A concentrator, comprising a series of cups, a ring in which said cups have rotary motion the said ring being wholly below the cups, means for rotating the ring, means for imparting a rotary motion to the cups, a rotary hopper arranged above the cups, and tubes leading from said hopper to the cups.

3. A concentrator, comprisinga standard, a table mounted to rotate on said standard, a fixed gear or rack above the table, gearwheels carried by the table and engaging with said fixed gear or rack, rings surrounding and supported by the table, cups having tubular extensions and having hearings in said rings, pulleys on said extensions, pulleys carried by the gear-wheels on the table, band connections between the said pulleys cups being arranged in sets, and means, comprising a single pulley and gearing, for rotatingindependently the several cups ofa set.

5. In a concentrator, a rotary cup of substantially hemispherical form, an imperforate tube leading from the bottom thereof,and a sieve material arranged across the inner end of said tube.

6. In a concentrator, a series of cups arranged in a circle and havinga space between them, a rotary carrying device in which the cups are mounted to rotate, means for imparting a rotary motion to the carrying device, means operated thereby for rotating the cups, a hopper, tubes leading from said hopper to the cups, and a conical bottom for said hopper, the apex thereof being upward whereby material is distributed evenly to the tubes.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

LUDWIG FREDRICK SOHOENEFELDT.

Witnesses:

HARRY PIFFER, JOHN T. RICE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB04B5/02