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Publication numberUS751589 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1904
Filing dateJul 3, 1903
Publication numberUS 751589 A, US 751589A, US-A-751589, US751589 A, US751589A
InventorsGeorge Westinghoitse
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sylvania
US 751589 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED FEB. 9, 1904.

G. WESTINGHOUSE. FLUID PRESSURE TURBINE.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 3, 1903.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

NO MODEL.

INVENTOR 7 WITNESSES.-

No. 751,589. PATENTED FEB. 9, 1904. G. WESTINGHOUSE. FLUID PRESSURE TURBINE.

APPLIOATION FILED JULY 3, 1903.

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WITNESSES: g /NVEIVTOR m. ATTORNEY UNITED STATES Patented February 9, 1904.

PATENT OFFICE.

GEORGE WESTINGHOUSE, OF PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR TO THE WESTINGHOUSE MACHINE COMPANY, A CORPORATION PENN- SYLVANIA.

FLUID-PRESSURE TURBINE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 751,589, dated February 9, 1904. Application filecl July 3, 1903. Serial No. 164,144:- (No model.) I i To (tZZ whom, it may concern:

Be it known that I, GEORGE VESTINGHOUSE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Pittsburg, in the county of Allegheny and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Fluid-Pressure Turbines, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to fluid-pressure turbines; and it has for one of its objects toprovide an impulse-wheel for such turbines which may be easily and inexpensively constructed and have great strength and durability.

A further object of the invention is to provide a turbine of simple and compact construction in which the propelling fluid may be supplied by one or more nozzles to an annular series of angular passages or buckets to exert an initial propelling force and. when exhausted therefrom to exert a further propelling force upon one or more sets of blades or buckets.

The invention is primarily intended for the utilization of the velocity of expanded steam, and for convenience of description it will be described as pertaining to a steam-turbine, but without intention of limiting the invention to the utilization of this specific expanded fluid.

Impulse-wheels have heretofore been constructed by attaching buckets of the proper shape to the periphery of adisk or by milling or cutting suitably-shaped buckets out of the solid metal of a disk. Both of these methods of construction have been found expensive, and wheels constructed in accordance with the first-named method have been found ill adapted to the service to which they have been put on account of their inability to withstand high centrifugal strains. It has'also been found desirable to shroud the buckets in order to prevent leakage of the working fluid over the ends. In the case of separately-attached buckets the shrouding has been imperfectly accomplished by means of a hood or projection over the outer end of each individual bucket, and where the buckets have been cut in the body of the wheel the shrouding has been effected by shrinking metal bands around the periphery of the wheel over the ends of the buckets or by attaching thin metal plates to the ends of the buckets. Both methods have been generally lacking in desired strength and security when subjected to the high centrifugal stresses which result from the velocities at which such wheels are operated.

In a wheel constructed in accordance with my present invention the material of the body of the wheel constitutes the shrouding, since the buckets or fluid-receiving passages are so cut in the body of the wheel that only the inlet and exhaust ends are open. I find it also feasible and advantageous to combine with the wheel so constructed one or more annular sets of revolving blades and stationary guidevanes, constructed and arranged substantially as is usual in turbines of the well-known Parsons type, in order that such velocity as may result from further expansion after the steam acts upon the impulse-wheel may be utilized.

In the accompanyingdrawings, illustrating my invention, Figure 1 is a view, partially in side elevation and partially in section, of a portion of an impulse-wheel and its, casing. Fig. 2 is a view, partially in plan and partially in section, of the impulse-wheel shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 8 is a view, partially in section and partially in side elevation, of the central portion and one end of a turbineembodying my improvements. Fig. 4 is a view, partially in plan and partially in section, of a portion of an impulse-wheel differing slightly from that shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig- 5 is a central sectional detail View of a portion of the turbine shown in Fig. 3.

The impulse-wheel 1 comprises a hub 2, which is keyed to a shaft 3, a plurality of radial spokes or a disk 4, and a rim or body 5,

'or body 5 of the wheel is provided with holes 9, which are drilled from the outer periphery inward and forward in the direction in which the wheel is to rotate, each at a suitable angle to the corresponding radius of the wheel, the axes of these drilled holes being preferably coincident with the central plane of the wheel and adjacent holes being in close proximity to each other. A series of holes 10 is drilled in each side of the body or rim 5 in such position that their inner ends will substantially coincide with the inner ends of the corresponding holes 9, the axes of the holes 10 at one side being preferably, though not necessarily, at approximately right angles to the axes of the corresponding holes at the other side, both sets of holes being suitably inclined, so that the passage of fluid from the inner ends of the holes 9 will be rearwardly with reference to the direction of rotation of the wheel. The holes 9 and 10 are preferably bored by means of cutters or drills having cylindrical ends, and consequently a curvilinear wedge 11 is formed at the meeting ends of the holes. The partitions 12 between the holes 9 may be chamfered at their outer edges, as indicated at 13, if desired, in order that sharp edges may be presented to the steam issuing from the nozzles 8.

In operation the steam is expanded in the nozzles and is discharged at high velocity into the adjacent holes 9 and is divided by the curvilinear wedges'll and its direction reversed as it is discharged rearwardly through the holes 10 at the sides of the wheel. The holes may be drilled to such depth as to remove the curvilinear wedges 11, if desired, and provide smoothly-curved passages for the steam, and the form and arrangement of passages may be otherwise varied within reasonable limits without departing from the invention.

The wheel shown may be utilized alone or in connection with other steam-utilizing elements or members of any desired construction.

In Fig. 3 I have shown additional steamusing means, as follows: Fastened to the sides of the wheel 1 by means of bolts 14 are lateral extensions 15, which are provided with one or more circumferential sets of blades or buckets 16, constructed and arranged in accordance with the usual practice in connection with turbines of the Parsons type. The casing 6 is provided with one or more sets of is shown in Figs. 1 and 2, one Variation being indicated inFigs. 3, 1, and 5, where the side holes 10 are shown as of gradually-increasing diameter from their inner to their outer ends.

The invention may be utilized in a singleflow turbine by providing the holes 10 or 10 and the supplementary steam-using devices at one side only and employing proper balancing means in a manner well known in the art.

I claim as my invention 1. An impulse-wheel having a series of fluid-receiving passages extending inwardly and forwardly from the wheel periphery and thence outwardly and rearwardly to the side surface of the wheel.

2. An impulse-wheel having fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly at a gradually-increasing depth from the wheel periphery for a portion of their. lengths and thence outwardly and rearwardly to the side of the wheel.

3. An impulse-wheel having a series of fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly at a gradually-increasing depth from the middle of the wheel periphery for a portion of their lengths and thence outwardly and rearwardly at a substantially uniform depth.

4. An impulse-wheel having a series of fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly into the body of the wheel from the center line of its periphery and thence outwardly andrearwardly in duplicate branches substantially at right angles to each other.

5. An impulse-wheel having a series of fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly and inwardly substantially in the central plane of the wheel and thence rearwardly and outwardly, in duplicate branches, to the side surfaces of the wheel.

6. An impulse-wheel having a circumferential series of fluid-receiving passages having their inlet ends at the wheel periphery and extending forwardly into the wheel-body for a portion of their lengths and thence outwardly and rearwardly to both side surfaces of the Wheel.

7. In a fluid-pressure turbine, the combination with a wheel having a circumferential series of fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly and inwardly and then outwardly and rearwardly to one or both side surfaces, of a casing having an annular steam box or chamber provided with one or more nozzles leading therefrom to the inlet ends of the wheel-passages.

8. In a fluid-pressure turbine, the combination with a wheel having a circumferential series of fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly and inwardly into the wheel-body and thence outwardly to one or both of the side surfaces and one or more circumferential sets of blades or buckets arranged to receive the impact of fluid exhausted from said passages, of a casing having an annular steam box or chamber, one or more nozzles leading therefrom to the inlet ends of the wheel-passages and one or more circumferential sets of guidevanes adjacent to the blades or buckets on the wheel.

9. In a fluid-pressure turbine, the combination with a wheel having a circumferential series of fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly and inwardly and then outwardly and rearwardly to one or both side surfaces, of a casing having a steam box or chamber provided with one or more nozzles leading therefrom to the inlet ends of the wheel-passages.

10. In afluid-pressure turbine, the combination with a wheel having a circumferential series of fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly and inwardly into the wheel-body and thence outwardly to one or both of the side surfaces and one or more circumferential sets of blades or buckets arranged to receive the impact of fluid exhausted from said passages, of a casing having a steam box or chamber, one or more nozzles leading therefrom to the inlet ends of the wheel-passages and one or more circumferential sets of guid e-vanes adjacent to the blades or buckets on the wheel.

11. In afiuid-pressure turbine, the combination with awheel having a circumferential series of fluid-receiving passages which extend forwardly and inwardly and then outwardly and rearwardly to one or both side surfaces, of a casing having a steam box or chamber provided with one or more nozzles leading therefrom to the inlet ends of the wheel-passages, one or more annular sets of blades adjacent to the outer ends of the wheel-passages and one or more corresponding sets of guidevanes on the casin 12. The combination with a wheel having a circumferential series of fluid-receiving passages which extend inwardly and forwardly into the wheel-body and thence outwardly to the side. surfaces and circumferential sets of blades adjacent to the outer ends of said passages, of a casing having a steam box or chamber, one or more nozzles leading therefrom to the inlet ends of the wheel-passages and circumferential sets of guide-vanes adjacent to the blades on said Wheel.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name this 15th day of June, 1903.

GEO. WESTINGHOUSE. l/Vitnesses:

DAVID WVILLIAMs, BIRNEY HINES.

Referenced by
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US6898338May 17, 2002May 24, 2005Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Fabry-Perot sensing element based on a large-diameter optical waveguide
US6915048Jun 17, 2002Jul 5, 2005Cidra CorporationFabry-perot filter/resonator
US7209606May 24, 2005Apr 24, 2007Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Fabry-perot sensing element based on a large-diameter optical waveguide
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF04D1/063