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Publication numberUS753230 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1904
Filing dateNov 6, 1903
Publication numberUS 753230 A, US 753230A, US-A-753230, US753230 A, US753230A
InventorsEeginald B. Calcutt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
calgutt
US 753230 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 753,230. PATENTBD MAR. 1,1904. R. B. GALCUTT.

HOSE.

APPLIUATION FILED Nov* s, 1903'.

1m MODEL. z SHEETS-SHEET 14 PATENTED MAR. 1, 1904.

R. B. CALGUTT.

HOSE. APrLIoATIoN rum) Nov. s. 190s.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2,

N0 MODEL.

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citizen of the United States, and a resident of .50 tended about an inch beyond the end of the UNITED STATES EEGINALD B. cALcUTT,

OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

Ho'sE.

SPECIFICATION forming part'of Letters Patent No. 753,230, dated March 1, 1904.

Application lerl November 6, 1903.

To all whom it may concern.-

- Be it known that I, REGINALD B. CALCU'IT, a

Chicago, in the county of Cook and State ofy Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Hose, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

My invention relates to the construction of iexible hose similar to that set forth in an application filed by meOctober l, 1903, Serial No. 175,258, and particularly the construction of the end of the hose, to enable it to be attached to the coupling of an air-brakeor similar coupling; and its object is to make a metal-bound iiexible hose the ends of which are so constructed that they can be connected to the projecting stub of the coupling by an ordinary clip or clamp, such as is used in connection with an air-brake hose, and without necessitating the use of rivets or the soldering of metal of the hose to said coupling. This I accomplish by the means hereinafter fully described and as particularly pointed out in the claims. A A

In the drawings, Figure l is a side view of a section of my invention, showing a portion thereof stripped, so as to expose to view theV successive layers of material of which it is composed and showing the end thereof in section. Fig. 2 is a' longitudinal central section of the same, showing the end extension of one of the layers turned back into the bore of the hose. Fig. 3 is a similar view showing my invention applied t0 an air-brake-hose coupling. Fig. 4 is a detail view showing a section through several coils of the inner metal winding in section. Fig. 5 is a longitudinal central section of one end of a modiication of my improved hose. Fig; 6 is a similar view showing the extension of its inner layer of rubber inturned and said end fitted over the stub of an air-brake-hose coupling. Fig. 7 is a similar section showing' the end of the hose clamped to said coupling.

In the drawings, H represents an inner spirally-wound strip of metal or wire, which eX- tends from end to end of the hose. I represents a rubber tube inclosing the said spiral metallic winding H, Vwhich has its ends g eX- 'seryiai No. 130,084. (No mais.)

winding H and the outer circumference of the portionthereof inelosing said winding preferablycovered with a layer J, of fibrous fabric. This layer J may extend the entire length of tube I; but I prefer to have its ends terminate at about the same points as the winding H, so as to leave the extension g uncovered.

Surrounding and inclosing the tube I and fibrous layer J enveloping the same, is an Aouter spirally-wound strip of metal or wire K,

which is wound, preferably, in the opposite direction in which the `coils of the inner metallic winding H are wound. The coils of these metallic windings H and K are wound so close that the edges of one coil will come in contact with the edges of the coils immediately preceding and following it, and in order that these edges may always be in contact and not open up when the hose is bent in kone direction or another the edges ofthe strips are beveled or made so that the outline thereof in cro ss-section will describe a rhomboid and so that the edge of one coil will lap over the edge of the coil next following, or, if the hose be reversed end for end, next precedingit, according as the case may be. While the width of 'the metal strips composing the windings H and Kmay be the same, it is preferred that the width of the outer winding be slightly greater than the inner winding.

When iiat metal bands of the same width are used, the points of intersection of the two respective strips are generally arranged in a straight line running exactly longitudinally'of the length of the hose, and therefore the hose would be weakest in a direction'in which it would be easiest for it to yield to the exterior pressure; but when different widths are employed their points of intersection are in a spiral order running around the hose,l and thus, being more scattered, the outward strain is not appreciably felt by and does not seriously affect the hose. i

In the drawings I have shown my improvements as applied to an air-brake-hose coupling cof the usual construction. These couplings have a tubular shank or stub projecting longitudinally therefrom that enters the end of the hose and is provided about midway its length with a circumferential rib c. Now

IOO

when the end of the hose is slipped over thesestubs past the rib c and as far as the shoulders of the coupling the coils of the metallicY winding are caused to expand, and without my improvement when clamped by the clip d' into the seat between the rib c and the shoulder ofthe coupling the joint would not onlymy improved hose is applied to the coupling,"

the end extension of .the inner rubber tube A is pushed back into the bore of the tube substantially as shown in the drawings, thus reducing the'diameter of the bore of the mouth of said hose, and then the end of the hose is pushed over the stub I; until the edges of the inturned extension G pass over the rib c.` The clip l is then slipped over the end of the hose thus connected to the coupling a and tightened. This tightening compresses the hose, so that the extension is reduced in thickness and elongated in both directions, so as to fill its seat on the stub Z) of the coupling between the rib c vand the shoulder of said stub so tightly as to absolutely prevent its displacement therefrom and at the same time make a perfectly-packed joint. The coils of the metallic windings-whichv have been expanded by being slipped over the rib o are alsoreduced in diameter by the tightening of the clip, not enough to cut through the rubber tube and its extension, but simply enough to restore them almost to their original diameters except just at the point where they pass over rib c, and thus avoid the possible tearing and breaking of the rubber and fibrous fabries of the hose. y

In Figs. 5, 6, and 7 I show a modified construction of my invention, which comprises an inner tube A, of rubber or other suitable material, that is inclosed in a spirallywound strip of metal or flat wire B, extending from within about one inch of one end of the tube A to within about the same distance from the opposite end thereof, substantially the same as that shown in the first four iigures ofthe drawings. This spiral metallic winding B is covered by a suitable cloth fabric C, and immediately surrounding this fabric is another spirally-wound strip of metal or wire D, and inclosing the metallic winding is an exterior envelop of thin rubber E.

I do not desire to be confined in the construction ofmy invention to the use of the fabric layers in connection with the metallic windings, as shown and described, nor do I wish to confine myself to the use of both an inner and outer metallic winding because one may be omitted, or, if desired, both omitted altogether; nor do I want to be understood as confining myself to the application of my invention to an air-brake coupling, as it is obvious the said metallic windings may be dispensed with and the extension of the rubber layer be used in connection withhose for other purposes, although my invention is peculiarly adapted for use as an air-brake hose. The extension which constitutes the principal feature of my invention may be used in connection with any coupling to furnish a tight and secure junction between the hose and coupling; but it even could be dispensed with and the hose with the peculiar metallic winding be employed without it in some cases.

"What I claim as new is l. As an article of manufacture, a flexible hose having a layer of spirally-wound fiat metal therein, and a layer of rubber one end of which extends beyond the adjacent end of the body of the hose.

2. As an article of manufacture, a flexible yhose having an inner and an outer layer of spirally-wound flat metal bands, and a layer of rubber one end of which extends beyond the adjacent end of the body of the hose.

3. As an article of manufacture, a flexible hose having a layer of spirally-wound at metal therein; a layer of rubber one end of which extends beyond the adjacent end of the body of the hose, and a fabric envelop for the latter.

4. As an article of manufacture, a eXible hose having an inner and an outer layer of spirally-wound flat metal bands, and an intermediate layer of rubber one end of which extends beyond the adjacent end of the body of the hose.

5. As an article of manufacture, a flexible hose comprising an inner and an outer layer of spirally-wound fiat metal bands, wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of less width than the outer, and a layer of rubber one end of which extends beyond the adjacent end of the body of the hose.

6. As an article of manufacture, a flexible hose comprising an inner layer and an outer layer of spirally-wound fiat metal bands, having overlapping beveled edges, wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of less width than the outer, and a layer of rubber one end of which extends beyond the ad jacent end of the body of the hose.

7. As an article of manufacture, a flexible hose comprising an inner layer and an outer layer of spirallywound flat metal bands, wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of less width than the outer, and a layer of rubber.

8. As an article of manufacture, a flexible hose comprising an inner 'and an outer `layer of spirally-wound at metal bands, having overlapping beveled edges, wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of less width than the outer, and a layer of rubber.

9. As an article of manufacture, a flexible hose having an inner and an outer layer of spirally-wound Hat metal bands, wound in opposite directions, and an intermediate layer of rubber.

IOO

IIO

ISO

lIO

10. As an article of manufacture, a iiexible hose comprising an inner layer and an outer layerof spirally-Wound iat metal bands, Wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of less Width than the outer, and an intermediate layer of rubber.

11. As an articleof manufacture, a flexible hose comprising an inner layer and an outer layer of spirally-Wound fiat metal bands, having overlapping beveled edges, Wound in opposite directions, and thev inner layer being ofV less Width than the outer, and an intermediate layer of rubber.

12. As an article of manufacture, aiiexible hose having an inner layer and an outer layer of spirally-Wound fiat metal bands, Wound in opposite directions, an intermediate layer of rubber, and a fabric envelop inclosing said layer of rubber.

13. As an article of manufacture, a iexible hose comprising an inner layer and an outer layer of spirally Wound fiat metal bands, Wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of lesswidth than the outer, an intermediate layer of rubber, and a fabric envelop inclosing said layer of rubber.

14. As an article of manufacture, aexible hose comprising an inner layer and an outer layer of spirally-Wound flat metal bands, having overlapping beveled edges, Wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of less Width than the outer, an Vintermediate layer of rubber, and a fabric envelop inclosing said layer of rubber.

15. As an article of manufacture, aiiexibie hose having an inner layer and an outer layer of spirally-Wound flat metal bands, Wound in opposite directions, a layer of rubber one end of Which extends beyond the adjacent end of the body of the hose, and afabric envelop inclosing said layer of rubber.

16. As an article of manufacture, a iiexible hose comprising an inner layer and an outer layer of spirally Wound Wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of less Width than the outer, a layer of rubber one end of which extends beyond the adjacent end of the vbody ofthe hose, and afabric envelop inclosing said layer of rubber.

17. As an article of manufacture, a iexible hose comprising an inner layer and an outer layer of spirally-Wound iiat metal bands, having overlapping beveled edges, Wound in opposite directions, and the inner layer being of less Width than the outer, a layer of rubber one end of which extends beyond the adjacentr end of the body of the hose, and a fabric envelop inclosing said layer of rubber.

18. As an article of manufacture a exible hose comprising a layer of spirally-Wound at metalv having overlapping edges.

19. .As an article of manufacture a flexible hose comprising an outer layer of spirally- Wound fiat metal having overlapping edges.

20. As an article of manufacture, a exible tube comprising an inner and an outer layer of spirally-Wound flat metal bands, wound in opposite directions, and having overlapping edges.` l

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 29th day of October, 1903.

Vitnesses:

E. K. LUNDY,

FRANK D. THoMAsoN.

at metal bands,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2706494 *Nov 9, 1950Apr 19, 1955Morse John FFlexible casing for push-pull cable
US2730134 *Oct 6, 1950Jan 10, 1956John F MorseCasing for push-pull cable assembly
US2763292 *Oct 8, 1953Sep 18, 1956Wiremold CoProtected collapsible tubing
US3086556 *Jun 10, 1960Apr 23, 1963Crane CoFlexible metal pipe
US3860041 *May 29, 1973Jan 14, 1975Ametek IncSelf-erecting tube
US5645110 *Dec 1, 1994Jul 8, 1997Nobileau; PhilippeFlexible high pressure pipe
US5791696 *Oct 24, 1996Aug 11, 1998Tokai Rubber Industries, Ltd.Hose with a protector
US5871240 *May 29, 1997Feb 16, 1999Tokai Rubber Industries, Ltd.Hose with a protector
US6024135 *Nov 30, 1995Feb 15, 2000Nobileau; PhilippeFlexible high pressure pipe
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF16L11/083