Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS7556226 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/469,993
Publication dateJul 7, 2009
Filing dateSep 5, 2006
Priority dateSep 5, 2006
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS20080054132
Publication number11469993, 469993, US 7556226 B2, US 7556226B2, US-B2-7556226, US7556226 B2, US7556226B2
InventorsCindy Muncie
Original AssigneeCindy Muncie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intravenous fluid container stand
US 7556226 B2
Abstract
An intravenous container stand according to the present invention includes an elongate pole having opposed upper and lower ends. The container stand includes a support member that may be selectively and removably coupled to the upper end of the pole. The support member includes a body portion coupled to the pole and at least one hook extending outwardly from the body portion for suspending an intravenous fluid container for delivery to the patient. A roller assembly, such a plurality of casters, may be coupled to the lower end of the pole for transporting the container stand to a desired location. The support member is selectively removable and replaceable, such as when different quantities of intravenous containers are needed or for the comfort and entertainment of a patient.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(5)
1. An intravenous container stand, comprising:
an elongate pole having opposed upper and lower ends, said upper end of said pole having a threaded configuration;
a support member including:
a lower surface defining an opening having a configuration complementary to said threaded configuration of said pole upper end for selectively and removably receiving said pole upper end in a threaded configuration;
a body portion extending upwardly from said lower surface of said support member and having a configuration indicative of a cartoon character for providing comfort and entertainment to a patient, said body portion extending completely between said lower surface and a body portion upper end;
a plurality of hooks extending outwardly from said upper end of said body portion and supported by said body portion from which containers of intravenous fluid are selectively suspended without interference with said body portion;
wherein said lower surface, body portion, and said plurality of hooks include a singular construction that supports said plurality of hooks and respective intravenous fluid containers suspended therefrom;
wherein each of said plurality of hooks includes:
a hook first portion having a first end connected to said body portion and extending outwardly;
a hook second portion having a generally arcuate configuration connected to said hook first portion at an end opposed to said first end, said hook second portion extending generally downwardly from said hook first portion and curving toward said body portion; and
a hook third portion connected to said hook second portion and having a free end extending upwardly from said said hook second portion, said free end configured to receive an intravenous fluid container, said hook third portion situated generally perpendicular to said hook first portion.
2. The intravenous stand as in claim 1 wherein said body portion includes the configuration indicative of a jester duck.
3. The intravenous stand as in claim 1 wherein said body portion includes the configuration indicative of a super hero character.
4. The intravenous stand as in claim 1 wherein said body portion includes the configuration indicative of an animal for providing comfort and entertainment to the patient.
5. The intravenous stand as in claim 1 further comprising a roller assembly coupled to said lower end of said pole, said roller assembly having a plurality of casters.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to medical equipment and, more particularly, to an intravenous fluid container stand having removable and interchangeable IV fluid container support members.

Stands having one or more hooks are traditionally used for holding intravenous bags of medicine or other fluids at the bedsides of patients in hospitals or other health facilities. Unfortunately, these stands can look quite intimidating, especially to children and particularly when many bags of medicine are in use simultaneously. In this case, it would be desirable to be able to remove the traditional bag-holding top portion and replace it with a bag holder having a configuration that is more comforting or even entertaining. Another reason for needing to remove and replace a traditional bag-holding support arm is if there are more bags that need to be suspended than the number of available hooks. Frequently, many fluid containers need to be in use at the same time and there may not be enough hooks from which to suspend the containers.

Various devices are known in the art for holding IV fluid containers. Although presumably effective for their intended purposes, the existing devices do not provide container-holding support arms that may be removed and replaced. Particularly, it would be desirable to have interchangeable bag-support arms having portions that provide comfort or entertainment to various age groups or categories of patients as well as portions that are functionally appropriate depending on the medical and emotional needs of various patients.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An intravenous fluid container stand according to the present invention includes an elongate pole having opposed upper and lower ends. The container stand includes a support member that may be selectively and removably coupled to the upper end of the pole. The support member includes a body portion coupled to the pole and at least one hook extending outwardly from the body portion for suspending an intravenous fluid container as the fluid, such as medicine, is being delivered to a patient. A roller assembly, such a plurality of casters, may be coupled to the lower end of the pole for transporting the container stand to a desired position.

The support member is removable and interchangeable in that support members having different utilities may be desired. For example, a traditional support member having a single hook capable of suspending a single intravenous fluid container may be desired on one occasion whereas a support member having multiple hooks may be desired in another circumstance, for example where multiple fluid containers are needed simultaneously. On still another occasion, a support member having a body portion indicative of an animal, a cartoon character, or some other likeness may be desired for the comfort, enjoyment, or general mental reassurance of a patient.

Therefore, a general object of this invention is to provide an intravenous fluid container stand having removable and interchangeable support arms for suspending respective containers of intravenous fluid.

Another object of this invention is to provide an intravenous fluid container having a support arm with a plurality of fluid container hooks.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an intravenous fluid container stand, as aforesaid, having a support arm configured as an animal or cartoon character.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide an intravenous fluid container stand, as aforesaid, having hooks that minimize inadvertent or accidental removal of IV fluid containers.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein is set forth by way of illustration and example, embodiments of this invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an intravenous fluid container stand according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the container stand as in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 a is a perspective view of a container stand having an interchanged support member;

FIG. 3 b is a perspective view of a support member as in FIG. 3 a removed from the pole and roller assembly;

FIG. 3 c is a sectional view taken along line 3 c-3 c of FIG. 3 a;

FIG. 3 d is an isolated view on an enlarged scale taken from FIG. 3 c; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of another interchangeable support member according to the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

An intravenous fluid container stand according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention will now be described with reference to FIGS. 1 to 4 of the accompanying drawings. The present invention may also be referred to herein as an IV container stand. More particularly, an IV container stand 10 includes an elongate pole 12 having upper 14 and lower 16 ends. (The upper and lower ends may also be referred to herein as the pole upper end and pole lower end, respectively). It is understood that the pole 12 may include a telescopic construction so that it is selectively height adjustable (not shown). For example, the pole 12 may include an upper pole member telescopically receivable into a lower pole member and that may be held in a selected configuration with a pin that may be inserted into a selected adjustment hole (not shown).

A roller assembly 18 may be coupled to the lower end 16 of the pole 12 such that the entire IV container stand 10 may be easily transported to a desired location by pushing or pulling it. Preferably, the roller assembly 18 includes a plurality of castor wheels 20 although other types of wheels may also be suitable.

The IV container stand 10 further includes a support member 22 a removably coupled to the pole upper end 14 (FIGS. 1 and 2). Forms of the support member other than as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 are also possible as will described in more detail later. The support member 22 a includes a body portion 24 and a hook portion 26 having at least one hook. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the hook portion 26 may be situated atop the body portion 24 although other arrangements are contemplated as well. The hook portion 26 may be integrated with the body portion 24 or be otherwise coupled thereto. As shown in FIGS. 1-3, the hook portion 26 preferably includes more than one hook such that multiple IV fluid containers may be suspended therefrom. Alternately, a support member 22 c having an even larger number of hooks may be included (FIG. 4) and interchanged with another support member, as will be described in more detail later.

A means for removably coupling the support member 22 a to the pole 12 includes complementary structures of the support member and pole 12. More particularly, the pole upper end 14 presents a male configuration (FIG. 2). In addition, a lower surface of the body portion 24 of the support member 22 a defines an opening having a configuration complementary to the configuration of the pole upper end 14 so as to selectively receive the pole upper end 14 therein. The pole upper end 14 and the body portion opening may be dimensioned to fit together in a relatively tight friction fit arrangement.

However, the pole upper end 14 and body portion 24 may be selectively joined in a threaded arrangement. More particularly, the pole upper end 14 may include threads 15 (FIGS. 2 through 3 d). Likewise, a lower surface 25 of the body portion 24 of a support member 22 b defines an opening having a complementary threaded configuration (FIG. 3 d). In use, a support member 22 b may be screwed on or off relative to the pole upper end 14.

The body portion 24 of the support member 22 a may include a configuration indicative of items selected from the group consisting of an animal, a cartoon character, a mystical character, a superhero, an antique, or the like. As an example, the body portion 24 of the support member 22 a shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 is indicative of a “jester duck”. Such a configuration is intended to instill feelings of comfort or entertainment to a child who is a patient in a hospital. Similarly, the support member 22 b illustrated in FIGS. 3 a to 3 d is indicative of a dolphin in that sea life may be viewed as a tranquil setting. It should be appreciated that body portions having other animal configurations or cartoon characters are possible. Similarly, antique items (not shown), e.g. an antique vase or the like, may provide feelings of peace and comfort to more elderly patients.

Another aspect of the IV container stand 10 is a unique configuration of each hook itself such that an intravenous fluid container is held securely so as to avoid the possibility of the container slipping or falling. More particularly, the support member 22 c (as shown particularly in FIG. 4) includes a body portion 24 and a hook first portion 28 having a first end 30 connected to the body portion 24 and extending outwardly therefrom. A hook second portion 32 is connected to the hook first portion 28 at an end opposed to the first end 30, the hook second portion 32 having a generally arcuate configuration. A hook third portion 34 is connected to the hook second portion 32 and presents a free end 36 that is configured to receive an intravenous fluid container. The hook third portion 34 is situated generally perpendicular to the hook first portion 28.

In use, a user may push or pull the intravenous container stand 10 to a desired location utilizing the roller assembly 18. A desired support member, such as the support members identified as 22 a, 22 b, or 22 c, may be positioned atop the pole 12 as described previously. More particularly, a support member may be threadably or frictionally removed from the pole upper end 14 and another one may be mounted in like manner. For example, the support member 22 c having many hooks may be mounted atop the pole 12 when a relatively large number of intravenous fluid container are needed simultaneously. Or, a support member 22 a or 22 b having a body portion 24 indicative of an animal or fictional character that is comforting for a juvenile patient may be selectively mounted.

It is understood that while certain forms of this invention have been illustrated and described, it is not limited thereto except insofar as such limitations are included in the following claims and allowable functional equivalents thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1261755 *Jul 3, 1917Apr 9, 1918Erwin T BeyleEmbalming-stand.
US1606354 *May 8, 1925Nov 9, 1926Fillion Joseph NoelFloor lamp
US2247774 *Aug 28, 1939Jul 1, 1941Edmond J ForsythCostumer
US3460789 *Apr 12, 1966Aug 12, 1969Horizon Ind LtdContainer suspension device
US3547275 *Jun 18, 1969Dec 15, 1970Engel Philip AMerchandising display apparatus
US4725027Sep 23, 1986Feb 16, 1988Joseph BekanichIntravenous equipment support
US4832294 *Apr 29, 1988May 23, 1989Demstar CorporationPortable I.V. stand
US5022538 *Nov 28, 1989Jun 11, 1991Fisher Scientific CompanyI.V. bag organizer
US5135191May 9, 1991Aug 4, 1992Jagco CorporationMedical support system
US5421548 *Apr 1, 1994Jun 6, 1995Bennett; James R.I.V. stand and attachments
US5480036 *Jun 8, 1994Jan 2, 1996Opar; Mark A.Greeting card display apparatus or the like
US5487476 *Mar 29, 1994Jan 30, 1996Barfield; Marvin W.Ornamental tree flower pot displays
US5556065 *Oct 19, 1994Sep 17, 1996Wadley; Robert D.Intensive care equipment carriage
US6375133Mar 2, 1999Apr 23, 2002Emergent Innovations, Llc.Intravenous (IV) pole for transport with multiple infusion devices
US6386142 *Jun 22, 2000May 14, 2002Wild Birds Unlimited, Inc.Modular birding accessory pole and associated birding accessories
US6390311 *Jul 31, 2000May 21, 2002Martin Paul, Inc.Ambulatory dispenser rack
US20020096608 *Jan 19, 2001Jul 25, 2002Cedarberg Industries, Inc.IV stand cord/tube holder
US20050120525 *Dec 9, 2003Jun 9, 2005Tom HeilCremation remains container system and method of memorializing deceased with same
US20060070968 *Sep 6, 2005Apr 6, 2006Ken TerhuneGarden stand and wine holder
USD290196 *May 23, 1984Jun 9, 1987 Clothes tree or similar article
USD326374 *Feb 20, 1990May 26, 1992 Clothes tree
USD329549 *Nov 15, 1988Sep 22, 1992 Clothes rack
USD369032 *Mar 10, 1995Apr 23, 1996 Clotheshorse
USD372156 *Sep 5, 1995Jul 30, 1996 Octopus towel rack
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US20130140780 *Nov 27, 2012Jun 6, 2013Stryker CorporationPole and topper for mobile medical device
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/176.1
International ClassificationF16M11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/1415, A61M5/1417, A61M2205/59
European ClassificationA61M5/14R2, A61M5/14R4
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 31, 2012FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Aug 31, 2010CCCertificate of correction