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Publication numberUS761288 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 31, 1904
Filing dateFeb 14, 1903
Priority dateFeb 14, 1903
Publication numberUS 761288 A, US 761288A, US-A-761288, US761288 A, US761288A
InventorsRobert A Cummings
Original AssigneeRobert A Cummings
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete-and-metal structure.
US 761288 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 761,288. R. A. CUMMINGS.

PATENTED MAY '31, 1904.

CONCRETE AND METAL STRUCTURE.

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1 Patented May 31, 1904.

PATENT OFFICE.

ROBERT A. CUMMINGS, BEAVER, PENNSYLVANIA.

CONCRETE-AND-METAI. STRUCTURE;

I SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 761,288, dated May 31, 1904.-

' Application filed February 14, 1903. Serial No. 143,279. (No model.)

To all whom it concern.-

Be it known that I, ROBERT A. CUMMINGS, a i

' resident of Beaver, in the county of Beaver 1 and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Concrete-and- Metal Structures; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear. and exact descripti'on thereof. My invention relates to composite metaland-concrete structures, such as bridges, viaducts, reservoirs, docks, floors, roofs, walls, and other portions of fireproof buildingsand other structures. 7 I The object of my invention is to provide a composite concrete-and-inetal structure which 1 is more rigid and stronger than similar structures heretofore used. In fireproof or other structures it is the c1istom to fill in the spaces between the metal members with concrete or the like in order to form arches, floors, Walls, roofs, and the like. Inasmuch as the concrete has very little ten- 1 sile strength, so that any strain thereon is liable to rupture the same, and also in order to stifien the same both vertically and laterally, it is the custom to embed therein metallic bars, known technically as core bars or 1 units, and preferably these core-bars'are pro- 1 vided with roughened or irregular sides or otherwise shaped so as to be of irregular form longitudinally in order that the concrete may obtain a firmer grip thereupon, thus 2 greatly aiding in resisting the tensile strains on the concrete. My invention relates to this class of concrete-and-metal structures; and it has for its object to provide a construction i whereby the core-bars are more firmly secured or anchored in the concrete, thus greatly strengthening the latter; and more especially against tensile strains.

The invention consists in general of acorew bar having broadened and fiattenedportions, together with one or more transversely-arranged plates, blocks, or other elements provided with openings through which the corebar passes and wherein it is locked by means of its broadened and flattenedportion, and which plates, together with the core-bars, are completely embedded in the concrete and serve as abutments against which the latter through transversely of the core-bar.

bears, so that longitudinal stresses on the.

anchor-plates being entirely embedded in concrete or the like.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view showing one application of my invention. Fig. 2 is a vertical section there- Fig. 3 is a similar view parallel to the core-bar. Fig. 4: is an end view showing a modification.

1 Fig. 5 is a plan view of the preferred form of core-bar. Fig. 6 is a similar View of a modified core-bar. Fig. 7 is a view showing a modified form of anchor-plate, andFigs. 8 and 9 illustrate the manner of joining the ends of two core-bars. I

In the drawings I have shown the invention applied to the formation of a composite slab of metal and concrete or the like; but it will be understood that this same structure can be used either for arches, floors, ceilings, walls, roofs, or other structure wherein concrete with strengthening core-bars are or may be employed. I

As shown in Fig. 1, the concrete 2 has embedded therein a series of core-bars 3, the laton the concrete. 7 This specific form of corebar, however, is old.. My invention consists in applying to such core-bar a series of anchor plates or bars having openings through which the core-bar passes and wherein it is locked by its broadened and flattened portion. My invention also consists in a series of core-bars of any form, together with metallic anchorplates extending transversely of said core-bars and so secured thereto as to be held against movement longitudinally thereof. The an-.

chor-plates preferably will be narrow flat plates; but they may be of various other shapes differing materially from that of a flat plate. In all cases said anchor-plates, together with the core-bars, are completely embedded in the concrete. These anchor-plates may be of various shapes, sizes, or lengths, and various numbers thereof may be employed. In Fig.

1 I have shown comparatively long anchor:

plates '7, applied near the ends of the corebars and extending a distance equal to the space between a series of such bars. These anchorplates 7 can extend the entire length of the slabor the space in the metal structure in which the concrete slab is placed or may extend any portion of said length or space. In said figure I have also shown anchor-plates 8, which unite only two adjacent core-bars, and anchor-plates 9, which unite three or more core-bars. In Figs. 1 and 4 I have shown anchor-plates 10, which do not extend between two core-bars, but are merely applied to a single core-bar, these plates being shown as circular, although any other shape may be employed. In Fig. 7 the anchor-plate 11 is provided on one edge with a notch or notches through which the bar or bars are passed. It will thus be seen that the anchor-plates may be of various shapes and sizes and may be applied to asingle core-bar or may be united to two adjacent core-bars or may be of suflicient length to uniteany number of core-bars. These plates may also be used to unite two bars, as shown in Figs. 8 and 9, wherein two core-bars 12 12 pass through a slot in a plate 7 and are thus united to form a continuous length of bar where bars of unusual length are required. These anchor-plates will be secured to the core-bars in any suitable mannerso that they cannot move longitudinally thereon. A preferred way of securing this result is by providing the anchor-plates with slots 13, preferably oblong or rectangular in outline, as shown, formed in the plate in any desired way and having the core-bars provided with heads or broadened flattened portions 14 of such dimensions that the latter can be passed through the slot and then by giving the bar a quarter-turn are brought crosswise of the slot in the plate and locking the latter to the bar. When a bar such as shown in Fig. 6 is used, anchor-plates can be secured only to the ends thereof, whereas with the form of corebar shown in Figs. 1 and 5 any number of anchor-plates can be locked thereto, since each of the broadened or, flattened portions of the bar will serve to hold an anchor-plate in position.

In the use of my invention the core-bars and anchor-plates are properly assembled, and then the whole are enveloped and embedded in the concrete, and when-the latter sets there will be formed a composite metal and concrete slab or other structure which is exceedingly strong and rigid, the anchor plates providing broad surfaces against which the concrete will abut, so that the compressive strength of the latter is fully utilized. The continuous anchor-plates 7 also resist strains in a direction transverse to the core-bars. In embedding such structures in concrete the ordinary practice is to place underneath the same a wooden frame known as centering, upon which the concrete is filled and which forms the lower face thereof. Difiiculty has been heretofore experienced in properly supporting the metal bars at the proper height above the centering in order that the concrete may be filled in underneath the same. With my anchor-plates, however, I may provide suitable tongues or projections on the same, as shown at 15, which project below the lower edge thereof and form a strut or support to rest on the centering and hold the metal members at the proper height above the centering. Preferably these projections will be formed in punching the slots in the plates, thus forming tongues connected at their lower ends to the plate, which are bent down, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, preferably alternately to opposite sides of the anchorplate, so as to form the projections or struts which will support the anchor-plates normally at right angles to the core-bars. These projections, however, maybe formed in a variety of other ways than shown; but this manner of forming them utilizes what otherwise would be scrap metal.

While throughout the specification I have referred to anchor-plates and have also used this term in the claims, it will be understood that I do not limit myself to flat plates, as obviously blocks or other shaped members, or even bars extending transversely of the core-bars and locked thereto, will also serve my purpose, although the flat plates shown are the preferred construction. The term anchor-plates, however, in the claims is intended to cover all shapes of such members.

What I claim as my invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. In fireproof or other structures, the combination of a core bar or unit having a fiattencd and broadened portion, an anchor-plate having an opening through which said corebar passes and wherein it is locked by means of its broadened and flattened portion, and concrete or the like enveloping and embedding said core-bar and both faces of said anehor-plate.

2. In fireproof or other structures, the combination of a plurality of core bars or units having flattened and broadened portions, a metallic anchor-plate having a plurality of openings through which said core-bars pass and wherein the latter are locked by means of their broadened and flattened portions, and concrete or the like enveloping and embedding said core-bars and anchor-plate.

3. In fireproof or other structures, the comsaidcore-bars and uniting adjacent ones thereof and suitably secured thereto,so as to be held against movement longitudinally thereof and concrete or the like enveloping and embedding said core-bars and anchor-plates. V v 4:. In fireproof or other structures, the combination of a core bar having a series of broadened and flattened portions intermediate its ends, a plurality of anchor-plates locked to said core-bar intermediate its ends, and concrete or the like enveloping and embedding said core-bar and anchor-plates. a

5. In fireproof or other structures, the combination of a series of core-bars having a series of broadened and flattened portions, and a series of anchor-plates having slots out therethrough and secured to said core-bars and uniting adjacent ones thereof.

6. In fireproof or other structures, the combination'of a series of core-bars, a series of anchor-plates secured to said core-bars both at their ends and intermediate their ends, so as to be held against movement longitudinally thereof and concrete or the like enveloping and embedding said core-bars and anchorplates. 4

7 In fireproof or other structures, the combination of core-bars, anchor-plates secured to such bars and provided With downwardly-projecting portions to rest upon the centering,

and concrete or the like enveloping and embedding said core-bars and anchor-plates.

8. In fireproof or other structures, the combination of core-bars, of anchor-plates having portions of the metal punched out to form slots through which said core-bars pass the punched out portions being bent to form tongues to rest on the centering, and concrete or the like enveloping and embedding said core-bars and anchor-plates.

9. In fireproof or other structures, the combination of a series of core-bars having flattened and broadened portions, continuous anchor-plates secured to said core-bars at each end thereof, and concrete or the like enveloping and embedding said core-bars and anchorplates.

10. A concrete slab having embedded therein a series of core-bars each having two or more anchor-plates locked thereto, so as to be held against movement longitudinally thereof, said anchor-plates also being embedded in the concrete,

In testimony whereof I, the said ROBERT A. CUMMINGS, have hereunto set my hand.

ROBERT A. CUMMINGS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3735543 *Mar 24, 1972May 29, 1973H SimonStructure for maintaining a space between overlapping roof shingles
US5419965 *Mar 8, 1994May 30, 1995Domecrete Ltd.Reinforcing element with slot and optional anchoring means and reinforced material incorporating same
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2/423