Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS762140 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1904
Filing dateOct 3, 1902
Priority dateOct 3, 1902
Publication numberUS 762140 A, US 762140A, US-A-762140, US762140 A, US762140A
InventorsWilliam Edward Watts Cates
Original AssigneeVacuum Tin Syndicate Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for exhausting the air from cans.
US 762140 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 762,140. PATENTED JUNE 7, 1904.

W. B. W. GATESL APPARATUS FOR BXHAUSTING THE AIR FROM CANS. APPLICATION FILED 001'. a. 1902.

H0 MODEL. 4 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

l/VVE/VTOR. WITNESSES.

5 kw Altar/w 5. y y.

PATENTED JUNE 7, 1904.

W. E. w.. GATES. APPARATUS FOR EXHAUSTING THE AIR PROM CANS.

APPLICATION FILED OUT. 3. 1902.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

N0 MODEL.

""4 Mam QM Law; Caz;

m: uonms PETER: uo wore-urge; WASNINGYON, n. a

No. 762,140. 7 PATENTED JUNE 7, 1904. W. E. W. GATES. APPARATUS FOR EXHAUSTING THE AIR FROM CANS.

APPLICATION FILED OUT. 3. 1902.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

E0 MODEL.

19y is Atorneys.

n: News Pugs; co. moniutnou wnsmuc'rou, n. c.

No. 762,140. 'PATENTED JUNE 7, 190.4.

w. E. w. GATES. APPARATUS FOR BXHAUSTING THE AIR FROM CANS.

APPLICATION FILED OUT. 3. 1902. N0 MODEL. 4 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

/ WITNESSES. //v mvro/r.

THE mums pzrgRs 00., Pumovirmn WASHMGYON, nv Q UNITED STATES Patented June '7, 1904.

PATENT OFFICE.

IVILLIAM EDWARD VVATTS- GATES, OF BRISTOL, ENGLAND, ASSIGNOR TO THE VACUUM TIN SYNDICATE, LIMITED, OF BRISTOL, ENGLAND.

APPARATUS FOR EXHAUSTING THE AIR FROM CANS- SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 762,140, dated J 11116 7, 1904.

Application filed c be 3, 1902.

T all whom, it nut concern:

Be it known that I, WILLIAM EDWARD WATTs OATns, a subject of the King of Great Britain and Ireland, and a resident of Broad Weir, Bristol, England, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Apparatus for Exhausting the Air from Oans and other Receptacles Adapted to be Hermetically Closed; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

This invention for improvements in apparatus for exhausting the air from cans and other receptacles adapted to be hermetically closed has for its object to provide an apparatus for conveniently and expeditiously exhausting that class of receptacle wherein a lid is held in position over the opening in the receptacle during the exhausting operation and when such exhaustion is completed forced down onto its seat to make an air-tight closure therewith by pressure of the atmosphere, and comprises a receiver or bell for inclosing thecan or receptacle during the exhausting operation, a cylindrical valve-chamber fixed on the top of the receiver, a hollow valve-spindle mounted to slide vertically in the chamber and projecting with its lower end into the upper end of the receiver, a piston-valve mounted on the spindle and normally held in the closed position by a spring, a spring fixed on the end of the spindle within the receiver arranged to prevent the lid of a receptacle from being raised too far when such receptacle is being exhausted and to force it into position when the exhaustion is complete, an exhausting apparatus adapted to exhaust the receiver, together with the receptacle placed under it, a table or support for the receiver connecting the same with the exhausting apparatus, and means controlled from a single hand-lever whereby the various operations of placing the receiver on the table, its removal therefrom after the exhausting operation, and also the opening and closing of the exhaust'connection are capable of being performed at a rapid rate.

Serial No. 126,821. (No model.)

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is an elevation of a power-driven exhausting apparatus constructed according to this invention. Figs. 2 and 3 are side and front elevations, respectively, on a larger scale, of the controlling apparatus for the receiver. Fig. 4 is a sectional elevation of the receiver on a larger scale, showing the same provided with a hand-operated pump. Fig. 5 is a plan of the receiver and pump, and Fig. 6 an elevation at right angles to that shown in Fig. 4.

The receiver (6 (shown in section in Fig. 4:) carries a cylindrical chamber 7), having a flanged base 6', by means of which it is fixed in an air-tight manner to the top of the re ceiver. The chamber 6 is formed with lateral 5 openings 6 and tightly closed at its upper end by a screw-cap b and internal packing-rings I), having central apertures through which passes a hollow valve-spindle c, which carries a piston-valve c and enters the receiver a 7 through an opening in the bottom of the chamber b. The valve-spindle c is perforated above the valve at c to admit air to the receiver, the air entering through the openings Z1 and chamber 6 when the valve 0' is pressed down. On the lower end of the valve-spindle c is screwed a nut 0 carrying spring-arms c, which project into the receiver and serve to keep the lid (Z of the can or receptacle (Z in place during the exhausting operation. A helical spring 30 c coiled on the valve-spindle and bearing at one end against a collar 0 on the spindle and at the other against the screw-cap 6, normally holds the spindle in a raised position, with the nut c, which acts as a stop, bearing 5 against the under side of the chamber 6, this position corresponding to the closed position of the valve 0. The spindle c terminates at its upper end in the disk 0 Figs. 2 and 3, or a handle 0*, Fig. 4, to which pressure is ap- 9 plied to open the valve, as hereinafter described.

The vessel (Z to be exhausted (indicated in the drawings by dotted lines) rests on a support 0, slightly raised above the table d, but connected thereto by a screw-threaded hollow shank 0 having a series of perforations 6 through which the exhaust apparatus or pump is put in communication with the receiver. To this end the table is mounted on the outer end of an exhausting-tube 1, Figs. 1 to 3, supported by a pillar or leg in. or by a bracket at a suitableheight from the ground.

The apparatus for exhausting the receiver comprises a vacuum-cylinderfi provided with an indicator f and connected with the two cylinders g' of an air-pump, the pistons of which are driven through a beam 71, arm a, connecting-rods 2', and crank 7' from a pulley k. Any number of the receivers are connected through tables a with the cylinder f by the pipes Z.

The raising of the bell or receiver to enable a can to be placed in position to be exhausted or removed after the exhausting operation is completed and also the lowering or placing of the receiver over the can at the commencement of the exhausting operation is effected by an operating-lever, which also controls the opening and closing of the exhausting-pipe.

As clearly shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the bell a is provided with laterally-projecting forked guides rt, adapted to embrace and slide freely on a vertical guide-rod 71, secured to the table. At a suitable height above the bell an arm or bracket 0 is fixed, and mounted thereon arc guide-pulleys 1/ 0 over which a chain or other flexible connection is passed, one end of the chain being attached to the outer ends of levers 7, pivoted on the top of the receiver in brackets (1 and whose inner ends are adapted to press on the disk 0 under the influence of a counterweight u, attached to the other end of the flexible connection.

The operating-lever comprises two arms .0 carried one on each end of a spindle .s,

mounted to rotate in a fixed bracket 2., arm 0'' being formed with a hook or other device r which engages in a lug r on the counterweight It, so that by turning the lever about its pivotal axis the counterweight a can be raised or lowered. A cock 1), seated in the pipe I, which supports the exhausting-table, and adapted to open or close said pipe, is provided with a toothed wheel w and controlled by the operating-lever through a toothed sector v1 gearing with the toothed wheel '0 and carried on the same spindle as the operatinglever.

In use the operation of the controlling-lever in one direction actuates the cock as to close the exhaust-pipe [and simultaneously lowers the counterweight 1/, which acts through the flexible connection 1) to depress the inner ends of levers q to first open the valve at the top of the receiver to destroy the vacuum therein and then to raise the receiver. The operations are so timed that the exhausting apparatus is shut off before the receiver-valve is opened. ()n reversing the motion of the lever the balance-weight a is raised and allows the bell (t to descend on its guide 01 under the action of gravity until it rests on the table.

The valve, which is mounted upon the top of the bell, is then closed by its spring. The further movement of the operating-lever then operates the cock to put the receiver in communication with the exhausting apparatus.

In Figs. 4 to 6 the exhausting apparatus is shown as adapted for hand operation. The table a for the bell or receiver a is formed on a base or casting w, which communicates bya passage w with the cylinder m of a handpump whose lower end is fixed in the casting. The table a is provided with lugs a, with which suitably-inclined lugs (1 formed on the receiver, are adapted to engage when the receiver is placed in position on the table and given a slight turn, the said lugs forcing the lower edge of the receiver, which is flanged, as shown, tightly down onto a packing-ring e interposed between the receiver and the table.

The hand-pump comprises an elongated cylinder 0, whose interior communicates with the passage w through an opening 11' formed near the lower end of the cylindeiywhich ter minates in and is closed by the casting w, while its upper end is closed by a cover m provided with an air-outlet valve The piston-rod ;1 has a handle at its upper end and passes through an opening in the cover m The piston is provided with avalve .2',which allows air to escape from underneath the piston as the piston descends. In operation the piston when starting is in the bottom of the cylinder. The receptacle (Z to be exhausted is placed on its support 6. The receiver a is then placed in position over the receptacle (Z and secured by giving it a slight turn to cause the lugs a to engage under the lugs a. The pump is then operated by hand to exhaust the receiver (L and receptacle (Z. When the receptacle (Z is sufliciently exhausted, the handle a, working in slotted guides 0', fixed to the receiver (0, and which replaces the disk 0 used in the power apparatus, is pressed down to force the lid (Z of the receptacle (Z into position and to remove the valve 0 from the lateral openings 6 whereupon air enters the receiver through the chamber 6 and hollow spindle c, destroying the vacuum in the receiver and destroying the atmospheric pressure. The exhausted receptacle can then be removed.

What I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. Apparatus for exhausting the air from cans and other receptacles which after exhaustion are closed by a lid held down by atmospheric pressure, comprising a receiver or hell for inclosing the can or receptacle to be ex hausted, a normally closed valve mounted on the receiver and adapted to open it to the atmosphere, a table or support on which the can and receiver rest during the exhausting operation, an exhaust or vacuum cylinder communicating with the receiver through the table or support, and means controlled by a single operating-lever for lowering the receiver onto the table and opening the exhaust connection at the commencement of an exhausting operation, or closing the exhaust, opening the valve in the receiver, and raising the receiver from the table or support when the exhausting operation is completed.

2. Apparatus for exhausting the air from cans andother receptacles which after exhaustion are closed by a lid held down by atmospheric pressure, comprising a receiver or hell for inclosing the can or receptacle to be exhausted, a normally closed valve mounted on the receiver and adapted to open it to the atmosphere, a table or support on which the can and receiver rest during the exhausting operation, an exhaust or vacuum cylinder communicating with the receiver through the table'or support, levers mounted on the receiver adjacent to the valve, a flexible connection attached to the outer ends of the levers and passing over pulleys, a counterweight attached to the other end of the flexible connection and adapted when free, to pull on the levers and through them to first open the valve and then raise the receiver, a lever adapted to raise the counterweight and thus lower the receiver, and a cock operated by said lever for opening and closing the communication between the receiver and exhaustcylinder.

3. Apparatus for exhausting the air from cans and other receptacles which after exhaustion are closed by a lid held down by atmospheric pressure, comprising a receiver or hell for inclosing the can or receptacle to be exhausted, a valve-chamber mounted on the receiver, a hollow valve-spindle mounted to slide vertically in the valve-chamber and pro: vided with perforations to admit air from the chamber to the interior of the spindle and through it to the receiver, a valve mounted on the spindle and normally closed but capable through it to the receiver, a valve mounted of being operated to open the valve-chamber to the atmosphere, spring-arms mounted on the lower end of the spindle and arranged to prevent the lid of the exhausted receptacle becoming displaced during the exhausting of the air and to force it into position when the exhaustion is complete, a table or support for the receiver and exhausting apparatus communicating with the receiver through the table or support substantially as described.

4:. Apparatus for exhausting the air from cans and other receptacles which after exhaustion are closed by a lid held down by atmospheric pressure, comprising a receiver or hell for inclosing the can or receptacle to be exhausted, a valve-chamber mounted on the rc- 6o ceiver, a hollow valvespindle mounted to slide vertically in the valve-chamber and provided with perforations to admit air from the chamber to the interior of the spindle and 5 on the spindle and normally closed but capable of being operated to open the valve-chamher to the atmosphere, spring-arms mounted on the lower end of the spindle and arranged to prevent the lid of the exhausted receptacle becoming displaced during the exhausting of the air and to force it into position when the exhaustion is complete, a table or support for the receiver, an exhausting apparatus communicating with the receiver through the table or support, and means controlled by a single operating-lever for lowering the receiver onto the table and opening the exhaust connection, or closing the exhaust, opening the valve in the receiver and raising the receiver from the table or support when the exhausting operation is completed.

In testimony whereof I have aflixed my signature in presence of two witnesses.

WILLIAM EDWARD WATTS GATES. Witnesses:

ARTHUR CRIDLAND, GEORGE GHIPLEY-BOLLISON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2591015 *Oct 20, 1947Apr 1, 1952Paul SchoemannApparatus for vacuum sealing of containers
US4901634 *Jun 8, 1989Feb 20, 1990Ookawa Iron Works, Ltd.Vacuum seasoning device
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA23L3/10