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Publication numberUS763973 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1904
Filing dateOct 22, 1903
Priority dateOct 22, 1903
Publication numberUS 763973 A, US 763973A, US-A-763973, US763973 A, US763973A
InventorsMichael Joseph Flynn, Dennis John Flynn
Original AssigneeMichael Joseph Flynn, Dennis John Flynn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle.
US 763973 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 763,973. I PATENTED JULY 5, 1904. M. J. & D. J. FLYNN.

BOTTLE.

APPLIOATION FILED OUT. 22, 1903.

N0 MODEL.

UNITED STATES Patented July 5, 1904.

PATENT FFICE.

MICHAEL JOSEPH FLYNN, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., AND DENNIS JOHN FLYNN, OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT.

BOTTLE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 763,973, dated July 5, 1904.

Application filed October 22, 1903. Serial No. 178,036.

similar letters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the figures.

The subject of this invention is a bottle which while designed more particularly for containing beer and like beverages may be utilized for other liquids; and the principal object of the invention is to practically prevent to a considerable extent the improper reuse of the bottle.

WVith the above and other purposes in view the novel bottle comprises a mouth portion containing a main or pouring opening and a small auxiliary passage or passages, both the pouring-opening and the auxiliary passage or passages all being designed to be closed by a single metal cap having a crimped engaging flange, which type of cap is in vogue at the present time. In using my improved bottle upon the removal of the cap the liquid contents can be poured from the bottle through the main opening, the auxiliary passage or passages serving under such condition as a venting provision. Manifestly after such employment of the bottle it will be unserviceable for further use in connection with an ordinary cork, because when the latter is inserted within the main opening the open character of the auxiliary passage or passages will preclude the service of the bottle with carbonated or charged liquids, besides presenting the additional disadvantage of not completely closing the bottle. Corks of special shapes, including upper lateral flanges, might be resorted to; but such would add considerably to the expense and difiiculty of using the bottle, and hence constitute obstacles that would ordinarily deter the improper reuse of the bottle.

(No model.)

In the accompanying drawings, forming 5 part of this specification, Figure 1 1s a view, part elevation, part section, of a bottle embodying one form of our invention. Fig. 2 is a plan view of the form of bottle disclosed in Fig. 1. Figs. 3 and 4 are plan views illustrating modifications. Figs. 5 and 6 are vertical sectional views, respectively, of the bot-' tles shown in Figs. 3 and 4c.

The type of beer-bottle shown in Figs. 1 and 2 has a distinct annular bead a externally at the upper part of the head A, said head being adapted for being engaged by the crimped marginal flange of a familiar form of metal cap which, as is well known to those informed in the art, is applied and secured by a machine. The main discharge or pouring opening a is eccentrically located with respect to the head, leaving the glass forming the latter much thicker at one side a than at the other. Longitudinally within this thickened portion is an auxiliary passage or passages a which are of relatively contracted transverse area and which open at the upper ends atthe top edge of the head, while communication is established at their lower ends with the bottle interior at a point below the plane occupied by a cork when in position.

From the description thus far it will be easy to comprehend that upon the introduction of the liquid contents within the bottle a metal cap will be placed upon the head, the crimped flange of the cap engaging with the head a. As thus conditioned the main or pouring opening, as well as the auxiliary passage or passages, will be effeetively sealed. Upon the removal of the cap the contents can be poured through the main opening, the auxiliary passage or passages serving in this instance as an adequate venting provision. Any subsequent attempt to utilize the bottle in an improper manner by introducing liquid and applying an ordinary cork will largely be prevented, owing to the fact that while the main or pouring opening will be closed the liquid contents cannot be maintained in a charged condition, owing to the open character of the auxiliary passage or passages. Should it be sought to evade this diificulty by employing a cork with an upper flange sufficiently ample to cover the auxiliary passage or passages, the increased cost of such special form of cork would present an obstacle that would practically render such practice seriously undesirable. The thickened portion a of the head, together with the specific location of the passage or passages (0, results in the glass forming the inner wall or walls of the latter being amply protected from injury by shocks or blows.

A bottle made as described will not only be highly useful and susceptible of the convenient handling of an ordinary bottle, but will be capable, owing to the vent provision, of having its contents readily poured. Moreover, the bottle is comparatively simple.

We do not desire to be understood as limiting ourselves to the construction thus far described, but reserve to ourselves the right to all modifications that may be fairly within the scope of our invention. For instance, the main or pouring opening may be of such crosssectional configuration as will render it inapt for an ordinary cork. a in Fig. 3 indicates this, in which case the side a of the opening contiguous to the thickened portion a of the head is of angular character, which besides contributing to present an opening that will not conform with the circular contour of such cork also provides increased-material for the thickened portion a.

The pouring-opening may be concentrically located with respect to the top of the bottle and also of angular configuration cross-sectionally. Thus in Figs. 4: and 6 the centrallylocated opening a is of polygonal shape, the comparatively thick portion a of the head surrounding the same containing an annular series of auxiliary passages a".

Having now described our invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. A bottle having a main or pouring opening, and an auxiliary passage opening through the top of the head and communicating with the bottle interior below the plane of the ordinary cork.

2. A bottle having an upper external bead a, a main or pouring opening, and an auxiliary passage, the latter opening through the top of the bottle-head, and communicating with the bottle interior below the plane of the ordinary cork.

3. A bottle having an eccentrically-located main or pouring opening contributing to form a thickened portion of the head at one side, said thickened portion containing an auxiliary passage opening through the top of the head, and communicating with the bottle interior below the plane of the ordinary cork.

4:. A bottle having an upper external bead a, and an eccentrically-located main or pouring opening, the latter contributing to form a thickened portion of the head at one side, said thickened portion containing an auxiliary passage opening through the top of the head, and communicating with the bottle interior below the plane of the ordinary cork.

In testimony that we claim the foregoing as our invention we have signed our names, in the presence of two witnesses, this 23d day of September, 1903.

MICHAEL JOSEPH FLYNN. DENNIS JOHN FLYNN.

Witnesses:

B. PATTERSON, EDGAR A. MONFORT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2465894 *Dec 29, 1945Mar 29, 1949Leo M MallickBottle closure
US3066819 *Jul 20, 1961Dec 4, 1962Richard R CoxFree-pouring jug
US4838464 *Sep 20, 1988Jun 13, 1989Graham Engineering CorporationVented plastic bottle
US6085949 *May 5, 1998Jul 11, 2000Liquid Container L.P.Container with molded-in directional pour guide
US8333287 *Apr 21, 2009Dec 18, 2012Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc.Bottle neck with internal embossments and method manufacture
US8591632Oct 29, 2012Nov 26, 2013Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc.Bottle neck with internal embossments and method of manufacture
US9051078 *Dec 27, 2006Jun 9, 2015Tetra Laval Holdings & Finance S.A.Spout for opening devices of sealed packages of pourable food products
US20100264107 *Oct 21, 2010Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc.Bottle Neck with Internal Embossments and Method Manufacture
US20120217256 *Nov 15, 2010Aug 30, 2012Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Container for containing a liquid, comprising fluid outlet means
WO2014092931A1 *Nov 15, 2013Jun 19, 2014Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc.Bottle with vented neck
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationY10S215/902, B65D1/023