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Publication numberUS767985 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1904
Filing dateNov 25, 1903
Priority dateNov 25, 1903
Publication numberUS 767985 A, US 767985A, US-A-767985, US767985 A, US767985A
InventorsStone John Stone
Original AssigneeSwan William W.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Space
US 767985 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED AUG. 16, 190

3. s, STONE. SPACE TELEGRAPHY.

APPLIOATION FILED NOV. 25, 1903.

Non 76?;985.

N0 MODEL.

N N BR- WwNrzssasat ntec? .ztugust 16, Tit/Ga SPACE TELEGRAPHY.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 767,985, dated A g 16, 1904. Application filed November 25, 1903. Serial No. 182,633. No modelat it known that l, .lous S'roNn Srosn, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Cambrhlge, in the county of Middlesex and.

State of Massachusetts, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Space 'Ielegraphy,

of which the following is a specification.

signal-waves and to produce the indication of intelligible signals, I employa thermo-electric couplethrough which the energy of the electric oscillations developed in the receivingwire is led and is thereby converted into heat, and this heat so developed causes a variation in the thermo-electric couple, and thereby produces an indication in a suitable signal-indicating device.

The invention may be best understood by having reference to the drawings which accompany and form a part of this specification.

In the drawings, Figures 1, 2, and 3 indicate in diagramyarious embodiments of my invention, and Fig. 4 shows in section a detail of construction hereinafter more fully described.

In the figures, V is an elevated receivingconductor connected to earth at E. C is a condenser. L L are inductanoes. B is a battery. (1 is a galvanometer o -her suitable signal-indicating device. T a telephone, and J is a thermo-electric ouple.

\ ln Figfl, Au and P25 represent two relatively large conductors of gold and platinum, and Au and Pt represent two exceedingly line wires or strips ofgold and platinum forming the. thormo-electric couple J. The tempcratl iro of the heated juncture J may be maintained by battery B at a temperature depending upon the position inthe thermo-electric scale of the materials employed in the construction of the thermo-elcctric couple. The currents developed in the elevated conductor by electromagnetic waves are led through the thcrmo-elcctric couple and by changing the TQmDGItUUIQ thereof vary the electromotive force of the couple, which produces an indication in the galvanometer (i or other suitable signal-indicating device. The chokingcoils L L confine these currents to the path containing the couple and prevent their passage to earth by way of the galvanomcter G and battery B.

In Fig. 2 the thermo-electrie couple J is connected in series with the resonant circuit C M L, which is attuned to the frequency of the electromagnetic waves the energy of which is to be received.

In Fig. 3 is shown a system employing the thermo-electric couple in which no battery is used, but in which the telephone T or other suitable receiver is connected across the terminals of the couple J by means of conductors containing the choking-coils L'.

In the three systems illustrated the energy of the electromagnetic waves is changed into heat, and the heat so developed causes the pro duction of thermo-electromotive forces which causes a current to flow through the signalindicating device.

In Fig. 4 is shown one embodiment of a thermo-electric couple suitable for the purpose herein described. This couple is con; structed by electrolytically depositing platinum upon a fine gold wire, then depositing gold in like manner upon the platinum, and repeating the process until a wire has been produced containing alternate lengths of gold and platinum. This wire is then reduced to a very fine diameter and the portions thereof immediately surrounding the alternate junctures of gold and platinum are coated with an insulating lilm as, for-example, a tihn of paraiiin. The wire at this stage is placed in a bath containing a silver salt and plated to a thickness considerably greater than its diameter with silver, as shown at Ag, Fig. 3. The completed couple will have the appearance of a continuous wire, but when highly magnified will have the appearance of the conductor illustrated in Fig. 4, consistingofa plurality of couples J in series, whereby the thermoelectromotive force developed by the heat generated by the oscillatory currents which pass through the series of couples is amplilied in proportion to the number of couples employed.

An apparatus whereby the herein-described method may be carried out has been claimed in my application, Serial No. 18 L282, filed December 8, 1903.

I claim-- 1. The method of receiving space-telegraph signals which consists in absorbing the energy of electroniagnetic signal-Waves, conveying the energy of the resulting electric oscillations to a thermo-electric couple and operating a signal-indicating device by the thern-1o-electric currents developed by said couple.

2. The method ofreceiving space-telegraph signals which consists in absorbing the energy 0t electromagnetic signal-waves, converting the dissipative energy of the resulting electric oscillations into heat and utilizing the energy of the heat so produced to develop electric currents in a suitable signal-indicating device.

3. The method of receiving space-telegraph signals which consists in absorbing the energy of electromagnetic signalwaves by an elevated conductor, amplifying the resulting electric oscillations by means of a resonant circuit attuned to the frequency of said waves, converting the dissipative energy of the amplified oscillations into thermal energy, conre'aeee l verting the thermal energy into the energy of electric currents and thereby operating a suitable signal indicating device. a

4. Themcthod of receiving space-telegraph signals which consists in absorbing the energy of electromagnetic signal-waves, conveying the energy of the resulting electric oscillations to a thermo-electric couple, elevating the normal temperature of said thermo-electric couple, converting the energy of said electric oscillations into heat by means of the thermoelectric couple and operating a signal-indicating device by the thermo-electric currents thereby developed.

5. The method of receiving space-telegraph signals which consists in absorbing the energy of electromagnetic signal-Waves, conveying the energy of the resulting electrical oscillations to a thermo-electric couple, regulating the temperature of said thermo-electric couple in accordance with the position in the thermoelectric scale of the elements forming said thermo-electric couple, converting the energy of said electrical oscillations into thermal energy at the thermo-electric couple and operating a signal-indicating device by the thermoelectric currents thereby developed.

ln testimony whereof i have hereunto subscribed my name this 24th day of November,

JOHN STONE STONE. \Vitn esses:

Ur. A. Hioeins, BRAINERD T. JUDKINs.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3444006 *Dec 16, 1963May 13, 1969Westinghouse Electric CorpThermoelectric element having a diffusion bonded coating