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Publication numberUS7680276 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 10/346,501
Publication dateMar 16, 2010
Filing dateJan 15, 2003
Priority dateJun 26, 1998
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS6510520, US7748049, US8312557, US20030159042, US20090013187, US20100262827, WO2000000895A1, WO2000000895A9
Publication number10346501, 346501, US 7680276 B2, US 7680276B2, US-B2-7680276, US7680276 B2, US7680276B2
InventorsEran Steinberg
Original AssigneeSecure Storage Solutions, Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Secure storage device for transfer of digital camera data
US 7680276 B2
Abstract
A secure storage device with the external dimensions of a PCMCIA card, for securing digital camera data at the acquisition stage. Original digital camera data is saved in the memory of the secure storage device which has the capability of performing one or more security functions, including encryption, creation of an authentication file, adding data to the image data such as fingerprinting, and adding secure annotations such as separate data included in an image-header. The device prepares original authentication data from original digital camera data, and encrypts and stores both the original authentication data and the original image data. The use of the device includes downloading the original image data to a first computer, and encrypted original authentication data to a second computer. The second computer can be programmed with software whereby the encrypted original authentication data can be decrypted by a user having a key. The software then allows the user to prepare corresponding second authentication data from second image data of questionable authenticity. If the second authentication data is the same as the original authentication data, the questionable second image data is deemed to be an accurate copy of the original image data.
Images(8)
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Claims(42)
1. A method of securing camera data comprising:
receiving, on a security device, unsecure camera data from a camera through an input means, the security device having an output means for connecting to a destination and being removably attached to the camera, wherein the destination is a computer;
securing the unsecure camera data within the security device to create secure camera data; and
transferring the secure camera data from the security device through the output means to the destination, wherein a transmission protocol for the receiving is a same protocol as used in standard communication to and from the camera and as a result the security device is transparent to the camera and the computer, whereby the computer and the camera respond to the security device as if it were an unsecure device.
2. A method as recited in claim 1, including connecting the camera to the security device via input means including first cable means.
3. A method as recited in claim 1, including connecting the security device to the destination via output means including a cable.
4. A method as recited in claim 3, wherein the security device is responsive to the same protocol as an unsecure device and as a result the security device is transparent to a camera and to a computer, whereby a computer and a camera respond to the security device as if it were an unsecure device.
5. A method as recited in claim 1, wherein the camera is a still camera configured for taking still pictures.
6. A method as recited in claim 1, wherein the camera is a video camera.
7. A method as recited in claim 1, further comprising a first step of inputting a security key to the security device.
8. A method as recited in claim 1, wherein the secure data is encrypted.
9. A method as recited in claim 1, wherein the secure data includes encrypted digital camera data.
10. A method as recited in claim 1, wherein the secure data includes encrypted authentication data.
11. A method as recited in claim 1, further comprising:
decrypting the secure data within the first destination.
12. A method as recited in claim 1, further comprising:
loading the security device with additional data; and
storing the additional data in the security device.
13. A method as recited in claim 12, wherein the secure data includes annotations taken from the additional data, and the method further comprises adding the annotations to a non-image area.
14. A method as recited in claim 12, wherein the additional data is downloaded from a computer.
15. A method as recited in claim 12, wherein the additional data is downloaded from a camera.
16. A method as recited in claim 15, wherein the additional data includes a time and date of taking a picture.
17. A method as recited in claim 12, wherein the additional data is encrypted data.
18. A method as recited in claim 12, wherein the secure data includes fingerprinted digital camera data, and the fingerprinted digital camera data includes additional data added to the camera data.
19. A method as recited in claim 12, wherein the additional data includes a time and date of downloading the unsecure camera data to the security device.
20. A method as recited in claim 12, wherein the additional data includes data indicating a unique single step image counter number for the camera in the security device.
21. A method as recited in claim 12, wherein the additional data is data indicating a unique identification of the security device.
22. A method of securing camera data comprising:
receiving, on a security device, unsecure camera data from a camera through an input means, the security device having an output means for connecting to a destination and being removably attached to the camera, wherein the security device includes:
first transceiver means for sending and receiving a radiated signal carrying data; and
second transceiver means for sending and receiving a radiated signal for transmission of the data through output means to and from the destination;
securing the unsecure camera data within the security device to create secure camera data; and
transferring the secure camera data from the security device through the output means to the destination.
23. A secure storage device comprising:
means for receiving unsecure digital camera data from a digital camera, the secure storage device being removably attached to the digital camera, wherein the secure storage device is responsive to a same protocol and file system structure as an unsecure device and as a result the secure storage device is transparent to the digital camera, whereby the digital camera responds to the secure storage device as if it were an unsecure storage device;
means for securing the unsecure digital camera data within the secure storage device and creating secure data;
means for storing the secure data; and
means for transferring the secure data to a destination.
24. A secure storage device as recited in claim 23, wherein the means for creating includes means for receiving a security key for encrypting data.
25. A secure storage device as recited in claim 23, further comprising a built in clock.
26. A secure storage device as recited in claim 23, wherein the means for creating includes means for encrypting the unsecure digital camera data.
27. A secure storage device as recited in claim 23, wherein the means for creating includes means for creating secure authentication data from the unsecure digital camera data.
28. A secure storage device as recited in claim 23, wherein the digital camera is operable to take still pictures.
29. A secure storage device as recited in claim 23, wherein the digital camera is a video camera.
30. A secure storage device as recited in claim 23, wherein the secure storage device has an external, physical configuration of a PCMCIA card.
31. A secure storage device as recited in claim 23, further comprising means for inputting additional data to the secure storage device.
32. A secure storage device as recited in claim 31, wherein the means for inputting includes means for inputting data from a computer.
33. A secure storage device as recited in claim 31, further comprising: means for including the additional data with the secure data.
34. A secure storage device as recited in claim 33, further comprising: means for encrypting the additional data.
35. A secure storage device as recited in claim 33, wherein the additional data includes absolute time and date.
36. A secure storage device as recited in claim 33, wherein the means for inputting additional data includes means for inputting from a camera.
37. A secure storage device as recited in claim 36, wherein the additional data includes a time and date of taking a picture.
38. A secure storage device as recited in claim 33, further comprising a built in counter.
39. A secure storage device as recited in claim 38, wherein the additional data includes a unique image identification number provided by the counter.
40. A secure storage device as recited in claim 33, wherein the additional data is a unique identification of the secure storage device.
41. A secure storage device as recited in claim 33, wherein the secure data includes fingerprinted digital camera data, and the fingerprinted digital camera data includes selected additional data.
42. A secure storage device comprising: means for receiving unsecure digital camera data from a digital camera, the secure storage device being removably attached to the digital camera, wherein the secure storage device is responsive to a same protocol and file system structure as an unsecure storage device and as a result the secure storage device is transparent to a destination, whereby the destination responds to the secure storage device as if it were an unsecure storage device;
means for securing the unsecure digital camera data within the secure storage device and creating secure data;
means for storing the secure data; and
means for transferring the secure data to the destination.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of prior patent application Ser. No. 09/105,593, filed Jun. 26, 1998, now U.S. Pat. No. 8,510,520, issued Jan. 21, 2003.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to digital still and video cameras and the transfer of data from a digital camera to a computer, and more particularly to an apparatus for transparently providing embedded security of data within a storage device and of securing data while being transferred from a digital camera to a computer.

2. Brief Description of the Prior Art

In many applications, photographic data needs to be guarded or i.e. secured against unauthorized viewing, modification or distribution. Negatives, positives and prints can be manipulated with some effort, and need protection when used to accurately document images. In such a case, the original negatives and prints are typically kept in locked facilities, with signed, sealed and witnessed chains of custody. The advent of digital cameras presents even greater security challenges. The concept of an original digital image is questionable, because digital data can be perfectly replicated. In addition, digital image data can be quickly and easily modified in a computer, rendering the data useless for evidentiary purposes. Currently, digital camera image data is downloaded either directly to a computer from a camera via some communication mechanism, or through a removable storage device, such as a PCMCIA card, etc. Upon downloading the data to a computer, the image data can be encrypted, or authentication data can be created to prevent an unauthorized person from modifying the data. From this point on, a witnessed chain of custody of those persons with access to the decryption key can be maintained, greatly easing the security problem.

From the above description of the prior art, it is apparent that there is a need for a method and apparatus for securing camera data automatically prior to, or as part of downloading image data from a camera. Such a method and apparatus would greatly improve the security of digital camera data.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for securing data from digital still and video cameras during the process of transferring the data from a camera to a computer.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a secure storage device for digitally saving data from a digital camera.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for securing data from still and video cameras during the process of transferring data from a camera to a computer, wherein the securing process is undetected by or i.e. transparent to the camera, and therefore providing a method and apparatus that can be used with any digital camera.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a secure storage and/or communication device that automatically encrypts loaded digital camera data.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an apparatus with dimensions and connectors in the form of a PCMCIA card that is accepted by a digital camera and a destination computer as a standard PCMCIA card, while performing the function of automatically securing loaded digital camera data.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a secure storage and/or communication device that can be programmed with a security key, that automatically stores loaded original digital camera data, and prepares encrypted authentication data.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a secure storage and/or communication device that inserts information into loaded digital camera image data, i.e. performs fingerprinting.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a secure storage and/or communication device that includes additional information along with the image data, i.e., provides annotations, such as the absolute time of acquisition, a unique and continuous image counter, and a unique image and device identification number.

Briefly, a preferred embodiment of the present invention includes a secure storage device with the external dimensions of a PCMCIA card, for securing digital camera data at the acquisition stage. Original digital camera data is saved in the memory of the secure storage device which has the capability of performing one or more security functions, including encryption, creation of an authentication file, adding data to the image data such as fingerprinting, and adding secure annotations such as separate data included in an image header. The device prepares original authentication data from original digital camera data, and encrypts and stores both the original authentication data and the original image data. The use of the device includes downloading the original image data to a first computer, and encrypted original authentication data to a second computer. The second computer can be programmed with software whereby the encrypted original authentication data can be decrypted by a user having a key. The software then allows the user to prepare corresponding second authentication data from second image data of questionable authenticity. If the second authentication data is the same as the original authentication data, the questionable second image data is deemed to be an accurate copy of the original image data.

An advantage of the present invention is that it provides a method and apparatus for securing data while storing and transferring otherwise unsecured image data received from a digital camera for transfer to a computer.

A further advantage of the present invention is that it provides a method and apparatus for securing the chain of custody of digital data from cameras that would otherwise provide only unsecured image data.

Another advantage of the present invention is that by putting the security function in a removable storage device, the storage can be customized for a particular user with no need for special hardware on the camera or the PC, enabling the retrofitting of otherwise unacceptable cameras with appropriate security functionality.

A still further advantage of the method and apparatus of the present invention is that the processing provided is undetected i.e. transparent to the camera and to the computer, and as a result the method and apparatus can be applied to any digital camera, and also to a variety of other devices that utilize peer to host and peer to peer communication and/or removable storage.

IN THE DRAWING

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating the use of the present invention to transfer data;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram showing the method steps of secure data transfer;

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a secure storage device;

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of a secure data transfer device;

FIG. 5 illustrates the transfer of secure data by way of data encryption;

FIG. 6 illustrates the storage device for secure data transfer through creation of authentication data;

FIG. 7 illustrates the process of a host computer for verifying image data authenticity through use of authentication data;

FIG. 8 shows a method of secure data transfer by way of fingerprinting and/or annotation; and

FIG. 9 illustrates the sending of secured data from a secure storage device to a first location, and public data to a second location.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawing, the method and apparatus of the preferred embodiment of the present invention is illustrated. The preferred embodiment includes an electronic digital signal processing apparatus, referred to as a secure storage device 10, and configured to physically engage with a PCMCIA card slot 12 of a prior art digital camera 14. Although the camera 14 shown is typical in appearance to a still camera, the method and apparatus also applies to motion picture/video cameras.

According to the method of the present invention, the device 10 is initially programmed to receive data from a digital camera, without the need of a password/key from the camera, and to perform the required processes to secure the data from the camera 14. The initial programming of device 10 can be either fixed, one time programming of a ROM, and/or it can be a program downloaded by a user from a PC such as PC 16. This programming data, as well as additional data, can be loaded into device 10 through the PCMCIA terminal 18 from a corresponding PCMCIA slot 20 in the PC 16. Alternatively, the device 10 can receive data through an input port 22 connected for example with a cable assembly 24 to a compatible port 26 of PC 16. The device 10 can be programmed to perform any of a variety of processes to secure the data, including encryption of image data, and/or creation of encrypted image authentication data, or watermarking, etc.

In operation, the programmed device 10 is inserted in slot 12 of the still/video camera 14. When the device 10 receives data from the camera 14, it performs the programmed operations and stores the data. The device 10 is then removed from the camera 14 and inserted into the PCMCIA slot 20 of the computer 16. The device 10 is configured so that the PC 16 recognizes the device 10 as a regular storage device with readable files on the file system level without the need for presenting a password. The secure data is then transferred from the device 10 to the computer 16. In order for a user to view encrypted data, the computer 16 must be programmed to decrypt the data, generally in response to entry of a password.

Referring again to FIG. 1, according to the prior art, a digital camera 14 is connected to a computer 16 by way of a direct cable connection indicated by line 28 making a direct cable connection from the camera connector 17 to the PC connector 26. In this manner, unsecure camera data is directly transferred to a PC 16. An unauthorized user could then easily modify the data with the PC 16. The method and apparatus of the present invention solves this problem by first transferring the camera data to the secure storage device 10, which automatically secures the data. Two alternate embodiments of the present invention are also shown in FIG. 1.

A first alternate embodiment includes a secure data transfer device 30 having an input cable assembly 32 for making a connection from the camera 14 connector 17 to a security device 34. The security device 34 performs the same or similar operations as those discussed in reference to device 10 for securing the image data, and outputs the data to the PC 16 through an output cable 36, which in operation is connected to connector 26 of PC 16. The device 34 is programmable, and can receive additional data in the same manner as device 10, by connection to a computer through either cable assembly 32 or 36, or alternatively through a connector 38, or by way of a PCMCIA card through a PCMCIA card slot 40.

The second alternative embodiment, also shown in FIG. 1, includes a wireless secure data transfer device 42, including a security device 44 that can be connected to a camera 14 by way of a cable assembly 46. The device 42 is programmable and receives additional data either from a PC through cable assembly 46 or connector 48, or by way of a PCMCIA card through slot 50. The device 44 includes a transceiver having a modulated infrared transmitter portion for generation of an infrared signal 52 for transmission of data to an infrared transceiver 54 which receives and demodulates the signal, and outputs the data to the computer 16 through a cable assembly 56. The transceiver properties of device 44 and transceiver 54 in addition allow for programming and other data to flow from PC 16 to device 44 through the wireless infrared connection.

In all of the above embodiments, the devices 10, 30 and 42 present a standard interface to the camera 14 and PC 16. From the camera's point of view, the communication appears as if a direct connection is made to the PC. Similarly, the PC observes a connection that appears to be directly to the camera. This feature of transparency of the devices 10, 30, 42 allows the apparatus and method of the present invention to apply to any digital camera and any PC that is programmed to receive digital camera data. The security is performed inside the device 10, 30, 42 and has no effect on the camera or PC.

The computer 16 of FIG. 1 represents a destination to which the camera data is being transferred. Although a PC is illustrated, this destination can be any computerized network, system, etc. capable of receiving the data. FIG. 1 also shows a second destination 57 with a data input connection 59. The second destination 57 is shown to illustrate an important alternate embodiment of the method of the present invention, wherein a user can hook the output of device 10, 30, or 42 to a first destination 16 to download a first set of data, for example encrypted authentication data, and then to the second destination 57 to download a second set of data, which for example could be authenticated image data.

FIG. 2 shows the basic process in block form. Block 58 includes the operation of a digital camera writing original digital camera data to a secure storage device without the need for presenting a password. This data is received by the storage device and secured (block 60), a process requiring a pre programmed key. The storage device then writes the secured data (block 62), again without requiring the receipt of a password, which is read by the computer (block 64). In this operation it is assumed that the user has loaded the required operating software into the computer. The user must then present a password/key to the computer in order to decrypt the secure data or perform an authentication operation (block 65).

It is important to point out here that the storage device described herein presents an external behavior/interface to the camera that appears to the camera to be the same as the prior art devices into which the camera is designed to download data. A major distinction between the prior art storage devices designed and used for digital cameras and the secure device of the present invention is that the disclosed device upon receiving data/information, performs operations to secure the data. This is done without requiring a password or key from the camera, which is an important feature of the present invention. Similarly, a computer can receive the secure data from the storage device without presenting a password/key. Once the secure data is loaded in the computer, a key must be presented in order to decrypt the secure data.

The advantage of this method is that no special programming or apparatus, other than the secure storage device, is required in order to securely transfer data from a conventional prior art digital camera to a computer.

The preferred external physical configuration of the secure storage device is that of a standard PCMCIA card, for example device 10 of FIG. 1 without the connection 22. In this configuration, neither a user nor the camera nor a computer can distinguish the secure storage device from a standard PCMCIA card. The device accepts data from a camera, and sends data to a computer using standard protocol as if the device is a regular PCMCIA card. The only difference is that the data is secured through any of various means which will be described in the following specification, such as encryption, authentication, etc. A user's only clue concerning the unique nature of this device is that encrypted data loaded into a computer from the device will not be intelligible until decrypted, a process requiring special software in the computer, including a password and/or key. A point of novelty illustrated in FIG. 2 is that no password or key is required either to download data from the camera to the device, or from the device to a computer, as indicated in blocks 58, 62 and 64. This method allows maximum security of data, while allowing use of a standard digital camera and computer for all phases except the find step (block 65), wherein the user must load appropriate software with a key into the computer for decryption of the encrypted data.

Other physical embodiments of the secure storage device are as illustrated and discussed in reference to FIG. 1. In addition, the device 10 can alternatively be a SSFDC (Smart Media) card, or flash card, etc.

FIG. 3 illustrates typical circuit blocks required within the device 10. The connector/connection 18 passes data from the camera 14 to a card interface 66 providing the necessary protocol for communication with the camera. Bus line 68 interconnects the various circuit blocks as required. This is a memory 70, which can include a EEPROM and/or a ROM and RAM as required in a particular design. The card storage block 72 indicates the use of a floppy disk, or mini disk, etc for retaining the data for storage and transfer to a computer. Card controller 74 performs the standard/usual card operations, with additional processes accomplished by processor 76, which preferably includes a clock 78, counter 80, and facility for receiving additional data (block 82) from a PC through either of connectors 18 or optionally through PC interface controller 84 from connector 22. The processor also performs image processing activity 86 including security process 88. The power supply 90 is included as optional in design, including a clock, for example, or where power cannot be obtained from the camera and computer.

FIG. 4 illustrates typical circuit block functions for devices 30 and 42. Device 30 includes cable connector assemblies 32 to a camera and 36 to a computer, and security device 34. Device 42 includes the cable connector assemblies 46 and 56, and security device 44 which includes the circuitry in security device 34 with transceiver circuitry 116 added, and the separate transceiver circuitry 54. Each of transceiver circuitry 54, 116 includes a modulated infrared transmitter portion 124, 120, respectively, for generation of an infrared signal.

The device 34 circuitry includes a camera connection controller 92, power supply 94, memory 96, a removable storage controller 98 providing interface to card connection 50, a PC interface controller 100 providing interface to cable connector assemblies 48 and 36, a processor 102 with a clock 104, counter 106, additional data 108, image processing 110 and a security engine 112. The storage 114 is optional for the data transfer devices 30 and 42, and is for storing the data to be transferred from a camera to a computer, and can be a floppy disk, mini disk, etc. Since the use of the devices 30 and 42 preferably involves connecting to both the camera and destination at the same time, data can normally be transferred quickly enough so that memory 96 can provide adequate storage/buffering. If applications require longer storage, the optional storage 114 can be included in the design.

FIG. 5 illustrates the processes of the secure storage devices 10, 30, 42 for encryption of original digital camera data. According to the process, the storage device is initially programmed with a security key (block 126). This operation is done as an initial set-up of the device, prior to it's normal usage. This key programming can be a permanent setting, or it can be programmable. With the devices 10, 30, 42 ready for normal use, it is then connected to a camera and receives original digital camera data (block 128). The device then encrypts the original digital camera data (block 130). Following this, the device is removed from the camera and connected to a computer loaded with compatible software. The device 10, 30, 42 then writes the data to a computer (block 132). A user knowing the security key can then operate the computer to decrypt the encrypted data (block 134). As explained in reference to the method indicated in FIG. 2, the device 10, 30, 42 does not require receipt of a password/key to receive data from a camera, or to download data to a computer. The key is used in the encryption process and is only a factor when a user desires to view the original data through use of the computer.

A secure storage device can also be programmed to create authentication data. This is illustrated in FIG. 6. As in the case of FIG. 5, the storage device is initially programmed with a security key (block 136) prior to use of the device. The device is then connected to a camera to receive original camera data (block 138). Authentication data is then created within the storage device from the original camera data and then encrypted (block 140).

Any person can then download the camera data, i.e. cause the storage device to write the camera data (block 142), and authentication data/file (block 144) to a computer. This completes the function of the storage device. The user can then proceed to use the computer as indicated in FIG. 7 to verify the authenticity of a set of questionable data. The user first uses appropriate software and the key to create verification authentication data from the questionable image data file (block 146), and decrypts the encrypted original authentication data (block 148). The two sets of data are then compared (block 150). If they are the same, the questionable image data is considered valid, i.e. an accurate replica of the original image data. If the two sets are different, the questionable data is confirmed to be different from the original.

FIG. 8 illustrates two similar processes called “fingerprinting” and “annotating”. Fingerprinting is a process wherein additional information is visibly or invisibly inserted into the image data itself. Examples of additional information that can be added include the camera serial number, date and time, unique counter, image storage ID, and any textual information that is downloaded to the storage device prior to receiving the camera image data. The process of annotation is similar to fingerprinting, except that the information is placed in a non-image area such as the header, rather than in the image data. Referring to FIG. 8, the storage device is connected to a computer and the required data is inputted, i.e. downloaded (block 152). This can be done through connection 18 for a PCMCIA card configured device 10, or through connector 22 of the alternative device 10. Device 42 is configured as indicated in FIG. 4 to receive data through port 48 or through cable assembly 46 or through cable assembly 50 from a PC, or through port 56 from a PC, or through port 50 from a PCMCIA card. Similarly, device 30 is configured to receive data alternatively through cable assembly 32 or 36, or connector 38 from a PC, or through port 40 from a PCMCIA card. The storage device is then connected to a camera and receives camera data, i.e. camera data is downloaded (block 154). The device then performs programmed processes of either fingerprinting the data or annotating the data file (block 156) depending on the specific programming of the storage device. The storage device is then removed from the camera, connected to a computer, and the data is written, i.e. downloaded to the computer (block 158). As explained above, this is all done without the presentation of a password or key from the camera or computer. Once the data is in a computer, however, the original data or authentication requires submission of a password/key.

In some cases, it is preferred to keep a signature file or authentication file in a secure, private location, and allow public access only to an authenticated image. These processes are illustrated in FIG. 9, wherein image data is downloaded from a camera 160 to a secure storage device 162, which performs the required security functions. The device 162 then downloads the image security data to secure location 164, and an authenticated image to public access 166.

Although the present invention has been described above in terms of a specific embodiment, it is anticipated that alterations and modifications thereof will no doubt become apparent to those skilled in the art. It is therefore intended that the following claims be interpreted as covering all such alterations and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification380/201, 348/231.8, 726/31, 348/207.1, 713/176, 348/231.5, 348/231.9
International ClassificationH04N5/765, G06F12/14, H04N7/167, H04N101/00, H04N5/907, G06F21/00, G06F21/24, H04N1/21, H04N5/91
Cooperative ClassificationH04N1/2158, G06F12/1408, H04N2201/3236, H04N2201/0049, G06F21/85, H04N1/32128, H04N1/2112, H04N2201/3235, H04N2201/0051
European ClassificationG06F21/85, H04N1/21B7, H04N1/21B3, H04N1/32C17
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