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Publication numberUS7733604 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/296,085
Publication dateJun 8, 2010
Filing dateDec 6, 2005
Priority dateDec 10, 2004
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS20060126223
Publication number11296085, 296085, US 7733604 B2, US 7733604B2, US-B2-7733604, US7733604 B2, US7733604B2
InventorsHiroshi Kameda
Original AssigneeTdk Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Perpendicular magnetic recording head with return pass layer
US 7733604 B2
Abstract
A length in a height direction from each end of a front portion of a return-pass layer (first magnetic layer) may be shorter than a length in the height direction from a midpoint of the front portion. As a result, a recording magnetic field may not be concentrated on and may not return to the ends of the front portion, and the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the ends toward the recording medium may be weakened, whereby it may be possible to appropriately suppress the erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal.
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Claims(7)
1. A perpendicular magnetic recording head comprising:
a first magnetic layer and a second magnetic layer, and magnetic field generating units that induce recording magnetic fields on the first magnetic layer and the second magnetic layer,
wherein the first magnetic layer comprises a front end surface and a rear end surface, the front end surface comprising a front portion disposed parallel to a facing surface facing a recording medium,
wherein a length of the first magnetic layer in a height direction from an end of the front portion is shorter than a length of the first magnetic layer in the height direction from a midpoint of the front portion,
wherein the front end surface has front sloping surfaces at both ends of the frontmost end surface such that a width between the front sloping surfaces in the track-width direction increases in the height direction,
wherein the rear end surface comprises a rearmost end surface and rear sloping surfaces, the rear sloping surfaces connecting continuously and directly from both ends of the rearmost end surface, the rearmost end surface extending parallel to the track-width direction and is formed at the position farthest away from the facing surface, and a width between the rear sloping surfaces in the track-width direction is gradually reduced from the facing surface in the height direction,
wherein the second magnetic layer is confined to an area of the first magnetic layer from a planar view,
wherein the rear sloping surfaces are longer than the front sloping surfaces, and
wherein each of the rear sloping surfaces is formed to come in contact with a phantom line extending from an end of the front portion in the height direction.
2. The perpendicular magnetic recording head according to claim 1, wherein a length of the front portion in the track-width direction is larger than a length of a front end surface of the second magnetic layer in the track-width direction.
3. The perpendicular magnetic recording head according to claim 1, wherein the first magnetic layer and the second magnetic layer face each other with a space interposed therebetween in a thickness direction.
4. The perpendicular magnetic recording head according to claim 3, further comprising:
a plurality of coil layers disposed on the second magnetic layer with a gap layer therebetween, a front end surface of the gap layer is exposed at the facing surface facing the recording medium; and
a coil-insulating layer covering the coil layers, a front end surface of the coil-insulating layer is apart from the facing surface in a height direction,
wherein the first magnetic layer covers the whole coil-insulating layer and the gap layer at a position closer to the front end surface of the coil insulating layer.
5. The perpendicular magnetic recording head according to claim 1, wherein the front portion is positioned flush with the facing surface.
6. The perpendicular magnetic recording head according to claim 1,
wherein each of the rear sloping surfaces is a linear surface.
7. The perpendicular magnetic recording head according to claim 1, wherein the second magnetic layer and the first magnetic layer have the same width in the track-width direction at the rear end surface of the first magnetic layer in the planar view.
Description

This application claims the benefit of priority to Japanese Patent Application 2004-357571, which was filed on Dec. 10, 2004, and which is incorporated herein by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a perpendicular magnetic recording head that induces a magnetic field on a recording medium in a direction perpendicular to a medium surface of the recording medium, such as a disk, to perform recording, and more particularly, to a perpendicular magnetic recording head which is capable of suppressing an erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal.

BACKGROUND

As shown in FIG. 12 (which is a partial plan view showing a perpendicular magnetic recording head), a recording magnetic head using a perpendicular magnetic recording method that magnetizes a recording medium in a direction perpendicular to a medium surface of the recording medium includes a first magnetic layer (a return-pass layer) 1, a second magnetic layer (a main magnetic pole layer) 2, and coil layers (not shown) for inducing recording magnetic fields on the first magnetic layer 1 and the second magnetic layer 2. The return-pass layer 1 and the main magnetic pole layer 2 face each other with a predetermined space interposed therebetween in the thickness direction. An induction field generated by a flow of an electric current through the coil layers is induced on the return-pass layer 1 and the main magnetic pole layer 2, and a recording magnetic field enters the recording medium in the direction perpendicular to the medium surface of the recording medium from a front end surface 2 a that is flush with a facing surface of the main magnetic pole layer 2 facing the recording medium. The recording magnetic field passes through the recording medium and reaches the return-pass layer 1.

As shown in FIG. 12, the return-pass layer 1 has a substantially rectangular plan shape in the related art. If the plan shape of the return-pass layer is formed in a substantially rectangular shape, the recording magnetic field that passes through the recording medium and reaches the return-pass layer 1 may be concentrated on and to return to the ends (corners) 1 b of a front end surface 1 a of the return-pass layer 1 flush with the facing surface. A lower part in FIG. 12 is a graph showing a relationship between a position along the front end surface 1 a of the return-pass layer 1 in the track-width direction and the intensity of the magnetic field generated toward the medium. As shown in the lower part of FIG. 12, since a strong magnetic field is generated from each of the corners 1 b of the front end surface 1 a of the return-pass layer 1, a phenomenon that erases a signal written on the recording medium may occur at each of the corners 1 b.

There has been an attempt to position the corners shown in FIG. 12 as far away as possible from the facing surface in the height direction in order to suppress the phenomenon of erasing a recorded signal. That is, as shown in FIG. 13, sloping surfaces 1 c and 1 c may be formed on both sides of the front end surface 1 a of the return-pass layer 1 in the track-width direction (X direction) so that a width between the sloping surfaces in the track-width direction (X direction) gradually increases from the facing surface in the height direction (Y direction).

A structure in which the sloping surfaces 1 c and 1 c are formed on both sides of the front end surface 1 a of the return-pass layer 1 is disclosed in each of JP-A Nos. 2004-39148 and 2004-12740 (corresponding to US Publication Nos. 2004004787A1 and 2004151036A1, respectively).

However, even in the case of the structure shown in FIG. 13, corners 1 e are formed between the front end surface 1 a of the return-pass layer 1 and each of the sloping surfaces 1 c, respectively. As a result, since a recording magnetic field may be concentrated on and return to each of the corners 1 e, a strong magnetic field may be generated from each of the corners 1 e toward the medium. For this reason, it is not possible to appropriately suppress the phenomenon of erasing a recorded signal in the structure shown in FIG. 13.

BRIEF SUMMARY

A perpendicular magnetic recording head that may be capable of appropriately suppressing a phenomenon of erasing a recorded signal may be formed by modifying a shape of a rear end surface of the first magnetic layer.

According to one embodiment, a perpendicular magnetic recording head includes a first magnetic layer and a second magnetic layer, and magnetic field generating units that induce recording magnetic fields in the first magnetic layer and the second magnetic layer. The first magnetic layer has a front end surface and a rear end surface. The front end surface has a front portion disposed parallel to a facing surface facing a recording medium, and a length of the first magnetic layer in a height direction from an end of the front portion may be shorter than a length of the first magnetic layer in the height direction from a midpoint of the front portion.

As a result, a recording magnetic field may not be concentrated on and may not return to the ends of the front portion, and the intensity of the magnetic field generated from each end toward the recording medium may be weakened, whereby it may be possible to appropriately suppress the erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal compared to the related art.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a partial cross-sectional view showing a perpendicular magnetic recording head according to one embodiment;

FIG. 2 is a partial front view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partial plan view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head according to one embodiment, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head having a different shape of a first magnetic layer;

FIG. 4 is a partial plan view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head according to another embodiment, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head having a different shape of the first magnetic layer;

FIG. 5 is a partial plan view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head according to another embodiment, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head having a different shape of the first magnetic layer;

FIG. 6 is a partial plan view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head according to another embodiment, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head having a different shape of the first magnetic layer;

FIG. 7 is a partial plan view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head according to another embodiment, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head having a different shape of the first magnetic layer;

FIG. 8 is a partial plan view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head according to another embodiment, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head having a different shape of the first magnetic layer;

FIG. 9 is a partial plan view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head according to another embodiment, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head having a different shape of the first magnetic layer;

FIG. 10 is a partial plan view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head according to another embodiment, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head having a different shape of the first magnetic layer;

FIG. 11 is a partial cross-sectional view showing a perpendicular magnetic recording head according to another embodiment having a structure different from that of the perpendicular magnetic recording head shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 12 is a partial plan view showing a perpendicular magnetic recording head in the related art; and

FIG. 13 is a partial plan view showing a perpendicular magnetic recording head in the related art having structure different from that of the perpendicular magnetic recording head shown in FIG. 12.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 is a partial cross-sectional view showing a perpendicular magnetic recording head according to one embodiment, and FIG. 2 is a partial front view showing the perpendicular magnetic recording head shown in FIG. 1. In addition, FIGS. 3 to 10 are partial plan views showing perpendicular magnetic recording heads according to various embodiments, and particularly showing the perpendicular magnetic recording heads each having a different shape of a first magnetic layer, and FIG. 11 is a partial cross-sectional view showing a perpendicular magnetic recording head according to the invention having a structure different from that of the perpendicular magnetic recording head shown in FIG. 1.

A perpendicular magnetic recording head H1 shown in FIG. 1 may induce a perpendicular magnetic field on a recording medium M to magnetize a hard magnetic film Ma of the recording medium M in the perpendicular direction.

The recording medium M may be formed, for example, in a disk shape, and the hard magnetic film Ma with high residual magnetization on the surface thereof may have a soft magnetic film Mb with high magnetic permeability. In this case, the recording medium may be rotated about a center of the disk as a rotation center.

A slider 101 may be made of a non-magnetic material, such as Al2O3 or TiC, and a facing surface 101 a of the slider 101 faces the recording medium M. When the recording medium M is rotated, the slider 101 may rise from the surface of the recording medium M or the slider 101 may slide on the recording medium M.

A non-magnetic insulating layer 102 made of an inorganic material, such as Al2O3 or SiO2, may be formed on a surface 101 b on the side of the trailing end of the slider 101, and reading part HR may be formed on the non-magnetic insulating layer 102.

The reading part HR may include a lower shielding layer 103, an upper shielding layer 106, and a reading element 104 provided in an inorganic insulating layer (gap insulating layer) 105 interposed between the lower shielding layer 103 and the upper shielding layer 106. The reading element 104 may be a magnetoresistive effect element such as AMR, GMR, or TMR.

A plurality of first coil layers 108 made of a conductive material may be formed on the upper shielding layer 106 with a coil insulating foundation layer 107 interposed therebetween. Each of the first coil layers 108 may be made of one or more non-magnetic metallic materials selected from Au, Ag, Pt, Cu, Cr, Al, Ti, NiP, Mo, Pd, Rh. Alternatively, each of the first coil layers may have a laminated structure in which the non-magnetic metallic materials are laminated.

A coil-insulating layer 109 made of an inorganic insulating material such as Al2O3 or a resistor may be formed around each of the first coil layers 108.

The upper surface of the coil-insulating layer 109 may be formed flat, and a coating foundation layer (not shown) may be formed on the upper surface thereof. A main magnetic pole layer (second magnetic layer) 110 may be formed on the coating foundation layer so that the main magnetic pole layer has a predetermined length from a surface F (hereinafter, simply referred to as a facing surface F), which faces a recording media, in the height direction (Y direction) and has a width of a track width Tw of a front end surface 110 c in the track-width direction (X direction: first direction)

The main magnetic pole layer 110 may be made of a ferromagnetic material, for example, a material having high saturation magnetic flux density, such as Ni—Fe, Co—Fe, or Ni—Fe—Co.

As shown in FIG. 3, the main magnetic pole layer 110 may be provided with a sloping portion S2 and a rear portion S3. The sloping portion S2 and the rear portion S3 may extend from a base portion 110 b of a front region S1 in the height direction (Y direction; second direction) so that a width W1 in the track-width direction (the first direction) is larger than the track width Tw. The front region S1 may be referred to as a main magnetic pole layer, and the sloping portion S2 and the rear portion S3 may be referred to as a yoke layer.

In the perpendicular magnetic recording head H1 shown in FIG. 1, the main magnetic pole layer 110 may be composed of a magnetic layer positioned on the side of the reading part HR.

Specifically, the track width Tw may be in the range of from about 0.01 μm to about 0.5 μm, and the length of the front region S1 in the height direction may be in the range of from about 0.01 μm to about 0.5 μm.

Furthermore, the widest width W1 of the rear portion S3 in the track-width direction (X direction) may be in the range of from about 0.1 μm to about 1000 μm, and lengths of the sloping portion S2 and the rear portion S3 in the height direction may be in the range of from about 1 μm to about 1000 μm.

Moreover, shapes of the main magnetic pole layers 110 shown FIGS. 3 to 10 may be all the same.

As shown in FIG. 1, a first insulating material layer 111 may be formed on both sides and the rear side in the height direction of the main magnetic pole layer 110. The first insulating material layer 111 may be made of, for example, Al2O3 or Al—Si—O.

A gap layer 113 made of an inorganic material such as alumina or SiO2 may be formed on the main magnetic pole layers 110 and the first insulating material layer 111.

As shown in FIG. 1, second coil layers 115 may be formed on the gap layer 113 with a coil insulating foundation layer 114 interposed therebetween. Similar to the first coil layers 108, a plurality of second coil layers 115 may be made of a conductive material. Each of the second coil layers 115 may be made of one or more non-magnetic metallic materials selected from Au, Ag, Pt, Cu, Cr, Al, Ti, NiP, Mo, Pd, Rh. Alternatively, each of the second coil layers may have a laminated structure in which the non-magnetic metallic materials are laminated.

End portions of the first coil layers and the second coil layers may be connected to each other in the track-width direction (X direction) so that the first coil layers 108 and the second coil layers 115 form a toroidal shape, respectively. A shape of each of the coil layers (magnetic field generating means) is not limited to a toroidal shape.

A coil-insulating layer 116 made of an inorganic insulating material such as Al2O3 or a resistor may be formed around each of the second coil layers 115, and a return-pass layer 117 corresponding to the first magnetic layer of the invention may be formed of a ferromagnetic material, such as a permalloy, over from the coil-insulating layer 116 to the gap layer 113. On a rear side of the return-pass layer 117 in the height direction is a connecting portion 117 b for connecting the return-pass layer with the main magnetic pole layer 110. In addition, a Gd deciding layer 118 made of an inorganic or organic material may be formed on the gap layer 113 at a position away from the facing surface F by a predetermined distance. A gap depth of the magnetic head H1 is defined as a distance from the facing surface F to the front end edge of the Gd deciding layer 118.

A lead layer 119 extending from the second coil layers 115 may be formed on the rear side of the return-pass layer 117 in the height direction with the coil insulating foundation layer 114 interposed between the lead layer and the gap layer. Meanwhile, the return-pass layer 117 and the lead layer 119 may be covered with a protecting layer 120 made of a non-magnetic inorganic insulating material.

As shown in FIG. 2, a thickness of the front end surface 110 c of the main magnetic pole layer 110 may be smaller than that of the front end surface 117 a of the return-pass layer 117, and the width Tw of the front end surface 110 c of the main magnetic pole layer 110 in the track-width direction (X direction) may be sufficiently shorter than the width Wr of the front end surface 117 a of the return-pass layer 117 in the track-width direction (X direction). As a result, on the facing surface F, an area of the front end surface 110 c of the main magnetic pole layer 110 may be sufficiently smaller than that of the front end surface 117 a of the return-pass layer 117. Accordingly, magnetic flux of a leakage recording magnetic field may be concentrated on the front end surface 110 c of the main magnetic pole layer 110, and the hard magnetic film Ma may be magnetized in the perpendicular direction by the concentrated magnetic flux. For this reason, magnetic data may be recorded.

Characteristic parts of the invention will be described below.

As shown in FIG. 3, the return-pass layer 117 includes the front end surface 117 a and a rear end surface 117 c. The front end surface 117 a is closer to the facing surface F than is the rear end surface 117 c.

The portion of the front end surface 117 a disposed parallel to the facing surface F may be referred to as a “frontmost end surface.” In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, the frontmost end surface 117 a may be an exposed surface positioned flush with the facing surface F. Alternatively, the frontmost end surface 117 a may be not an exposed surface positioned flush with the facing surface F. That is, the frontmost end surface 117 a may be slightly set back from the facing surface F in the height direction. However, the return-pass layer 117 is a part that receives (couples) a recording magnetic field returning from the main magnetic pole layer 110 through the recording medium M, and when the frontmost end surface 117 a is set back from the facing surface F, the return-pass layer may not be appropriately coupled. For this reason, since the perpendicular magnetic field returning from the main magnetic pole layer 110 may broaden, recording efficiency may decline. Therefore, it is preferable that the frontmost end surface 117 a be an exposed surface positioned flush with the facing surface F.

As shown in FIG. 3, a rear end surface 117 c of the return-pass layer 117 may include the rearmost end surface 117 e and sloping surfaces 117 f. The rearmost end surface 117 e extends parallel to the track-width direction (X direction) and is formed at the position farthest away from the facing surface F in the height direction (Y direction). Further, the sloping surfaces 117 f are formed so that a width between the sloping surfaces in the track-width direction (X direction) gradually increases from both ends 117 e 1 of the rearmost end surface 117 e toward the facing surface F. Each of the ends 117 f 1 of the sloping surfaces 117 f on the side of the facing surface F meets with each of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a. Accordingly, as shown in FIG. 3, a plan shape of the return-pass layer 117 may be substantially trapezoidal.

As shown in FIG. 3, the return-pass layer 117 has a length L1 in the height direction (Y direction) from a midpoint of the frontmost end surface 117 a, and a length in the height direction from each of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a may be smaller than the length L1.

As a result, it may be difficult to concentrate magnetic flux on the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a of the return-pass layer 117, and the intensity of the magnetic field generated from each end 117 a 1 toward the recording medium M may be weakened compared to that in the related art. A lower part in FIG. 3 is a graph showing a relationship between a position along the frontmost end surface 117 a in the track-width direction and the magnetic field intensity generated toward the recording medium M. As shown in FIG. 3, it may be possible to suppress the phenomenon in which a magnetic field is strongly generated from the ends 117 a 1 in the related art. Therefore, compared to the related art, it may be possible to further suppress the phenomenon in which a recorded signal is erased on each end 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a.

Since volumes of the return-pass layer 117 near the ends 117 a 1 may be smaller than a volume of the return-pass layer 117 near the midpoint in the track-width direction, it may be difficult to concentrate magnetic flux on the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a of the return-pass layer 117. In this case, since the whole return-pass layer 117 may be formed to have a uniform film thickness, the volume may be measured by the length in the height direction.

In addition, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, each of the ends 117 f 1 of the sloping surfaces 117 f formed on the rear end surface 117 c of the return-pass layer 117 meets with each of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a. Accordingly, there is no linear surface parallel to the height direction (Y direction) near the ends 117 a 1. For this reason, it may be difficult to form a magnetic domain magnetized in the height direction near the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a, and a magnetic domain magnetized in the track-width direction (X direction) may be formed near the ends 117 a 1. That is, since shape anisotropy in the track-width direction may be obtained near the ends 117 a 1, the magnetic field may not be generated from the ends 117 a 1 toward the recording medium M.

Furthermore, if the return-pass layer 117 is formed in the shape shown in FIG. 3, it may be effective as a countermeasure against an external magnetic field. For example, when the perpendicular magnetic recording head H1 shown in FIG. 1 is mounted in various electronic components such as computer terminals (mobile), the external magnetic field generated from the magnetic product owned by a user occasionally may have a negative influence on the perpendicular magnetic recording head H1. Even in this case, the external magnetic field may not be concentrated on and absorbed into the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a of the return-pass layer 117. Accordingly, it may be possible to suppress the erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal caused by the external magnetic field.

An embodiment shown in FIG. 4 may be different from that shown in FIG. 3 in terms of the shape of the return-pass layer 117. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, a return-pass layer includes a rear end surface 117 c, a front end surface 117 a and side surfaces 117 h. The rear end surface 117 c includes the rearmost end surface 117 e, and sloping surfaces 117 f. Each of the side surfaces 117 h connects each of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a with each end 117 f 1 of the sloping surfaces 117 f, and extends parallel to a height direction (Y direction). In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the return-pass layer has a length L2 in the height direction (Y direction) from each of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a, and the length L2 in the height direction may be longer than the that in the embodiment shown in FIG. 3. However, even in the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the length L2 from each of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a in the height direction (Y direction) may be shorter than the length L1 of the return-pass layer 117 from a midpoint of the frontmost end surface 117 a in the height direction. For this reason, it may be difficult to concentrate magnetic flux on the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a of the return-pass layer 117, and the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the ends 117 a 1 toward the recording medium M may be weakened compared to that in the related art. Accordingly, it may be possible to suppress the phenomenon in which magnetic field intensity generated from the ends 117 a 1 is more intense compared to that generated from other positions of the return-pass layer 117, and to more appropriately suppress the erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal compared to that in the related art.

An embodiment shown in FIG. 5 may be different from that shown in FIG. 4 in terms of the shape of the rear end surface 117 c of the return-pass layer 117. In FIG. 5, the rear end surface 117 c includes the rearmost end surface 117 e and sloping surfaces 117 g. The rearmost end surface 117 e is formed parallel to the track-width direction (X direction) at the position farthest away from the facing surface F in the height direction. Further, the sloping surfaces 117 g are formed so that a width between the sloping surfaces in the track-width direction (X direction) gradually increases from the side ends 117 e 1 and 117 e 1 of the rearmost end surface 117 e toward the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a. In this case, in FIG. 5, each of the sloping surfaces 117 g may be formed in a curved shape. In FIG. 5, each of the sloping surfaces 117 g may be concavely formed toward the facing surface F. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, a rear end surface 117 c of the return-pass layer 117 is composed of the rearmost end surface 117 e and curved sloping surfaces 117 n, similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 5. However, in FIG. 6, each of the sloping surfaces 117 n may be formed in a convex shape in a direction away from the facing surface F (that is, in the height direction).

In the case of the shape of the return-pass layer 117 shown in FIG. 5, volumes of the return-pass layer 117 near the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a may be smaller than the volumes corresponding to the shape shown in FIG. 6. For this reason, in the case of the shape of the return-pass layer shown in FIG. 5 compared to the shape of that shown in FIG. 6, it may be difficult to concentrate magnetic flux in the vicinity of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a. Thus, the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the ends 117 a 1 toward the recording medium M may be appropriately weakened. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, a length L4 in the height direction from each of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a may be shorter than the length L1 of the return-pass layer 117 in the height direction from the midpoint of the frontmost end surface 117 a. For this reason, it may be difficult to concentrate magnetic flux on the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a, and the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the ends 117 a 1 toward the recording medium M may be appropriately weakened compared to that in the related art.

In an embodiment shown in FIG. 7, a rear end surface 117 c of the return-pass layer 117 includes the rearmost end surface 117 e, first regulating surfaces 117 i, and sloping surfaces (second regulating surfaces) 117 j. The rearmost end surface 117 e is formed parallel to the track-width direction at the position farthest away from the facing surface F in the height direction (Y direction). Further, the first regulating surfaces face a direction parallel to the height direction (Y direction) from the side ends 117 e 1 and 117 e 1 of the rearmost end surface 117 e. Furthermore, the sloping surfaces are inclined so that a width between the sloping surfaces in the track-width direction gradually increases from ends (connecting ends) 117 i 1 of the first regulating surfaces 117 i on the side of the facing surface F toward the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 7, corners A connecting the first regulating surfaces 117 i with the second regulating surfaces 117 j as well as corners B connecting the rearmost end surface 117 e with the first regulating surfaces 117 i are formed on the rear end surface 117 c.

At each of the corners A, an angle θ1 between the track-width direction (X direction) and the direction parallel to the first regulating surfaces 117 i may be larger than an angle θ2 between the track-width direction (X direction) and the direction parallel to the second regulating surfaces 117 j. As a result, each of the corners A has an angle larger than 180° as viewed from the facing surface F. When the corners are formed on the rear end surface 117 c, a magnetic domain magnetized in the height direction may be formed at each of the corners A. In particular, each of the first regulating surfaces 117 i is a surface facing a direction parallel to the height direction (Y direction) in the embodiment shown in FIG. 7. Accordingly, a magnetic domain magnetized in the height direction may be formed near each of the corners A. Preferably each of the corners A is as far away as possible from the frontmost end surface 117 a in the height direction (Y direction). If each of the corners A is close to the frontmost end surface 117 a, magnetism may leak out from a magnetic domain magnetized in the height direction toward the medium M. Therefore, the erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal may occur at a position of the frontmost end surface 117 a having each of the corners A on the rear side thereof.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 7, the second regulating surfaces 117 j may be composed of sloping surfaces. The sloping surfaces may be inclined so that a width between the sloping surfaces in the track-width direction gradually increases toward the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a. As a result, a length L5 in the height direction from each of the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a may be appropriately formed to be short, and a length L6 in the height direction from each of the corners A to the frontmost end surface 117 a may be appropriately formed to be long. Accordingly, the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a toward the recording medium M may be appropriately weakened compared to that in the related art, and the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the position of the frontmost end surface 117 a having each of the corners A on the rear side thereof may also be weakened.

In addition, when the sloping surfaces shown in FIGS. 3 to 7 are not formed on the rear end surface 117 c, that is, when the rear end surface 117 c is composed of first regulating surfaces 117 i extending parallel to the height direction (Y direction) and second regulating surfaces 117 k extending parallel to the track-width direction (X direction) as shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, it may be possible to more appropriately suppress the erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal in the embodiment shown in FIG. 8 compared to an embodiment shown in FIG. 9.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 8, the rear end surface 117 c of the return-pass layer 117 includes the rearmost end surface 117 e, first regulating surfaces 117 i, and second regulating surfaces 117 k. The rearmost end surface 117 e is provided at the position farthest away from the facing surface F in the height direction (Y direction) and extends parallel to the track-width direction (X direction). Further, the first regulating surfaces extend parallel to the height direction from the side ends of the rearmost end surface 117 e toward the facing surface F. Furthermore, the second regulating surfaces extend parallel to the track-width direction from ends (connecting ends) of the first regulating surfaces 117 i toward the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a. Moreover, corners C, each of which has an angle larger than 180° as viewed from the facing surface F, are provided on both sides in the height direction between each of the first regulating surfaces 117 i and each of the second regulating surfaces 117 k. In this case, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 8, a pair of first regulating surfaces 117 i and a pair of second regulating surfaces 117 k are provided close to the facing surface F, and corners E, each of which has an angle larger than 180° as viewed from the facing surface F, are provided on both sides in the track-width direction, respectively. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 8, each of the first regulating surfaces 117 i and each of the second regulating surfaces 117 k are alternately connected so that a width between first regulating surfaces in the track-width direction (X direction) is reduced in phases from the facing surface F in the height direction.

Meanwhile, in FIG. 9, a rear end surface 117 c of the return-pass layer 117 includes first regulating surfaces 117 i and second regulating surfaces 117 k. The first regulating surfaces extend parallel to the height direction from the side ends of the rearmost end surface 117 e. Further, the second regulating surfaces extend parallel to the track-width direction from ends (connecting ends) of the first regulating surfaces 117 i toward the ends 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a. Moreover, corners G, each of which has an angle larger than 180° as viewed from the facing surface F, are provided between each of the first regulating surfaces 117 i and each of the second regulating surfaces 117 k, respectively. Each of the ends of the second regulating surfaces 117 k is connected to each of the ends 117 a 1 and 171 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a by each of the side surfaces 117 h.

In FIG. 9, the corners G, each of which has an angle larger than 180° as viewed from the facing surface F, are very close to the frontmost end surface 117 a. Therefore, a strong magnetic field may be generated from a position of the frontmost end surface 117 a having each of the corners G on the rear side thereof toward the medium M. Moreover, long first regulating surfaces 117 i are formed near the corners G in the height direction, respectively. Accordingly, a magnetic domain magnetized in the height direction may be formed largely near each of the corners G. As a result, as shown in the lower part of FIG. 9, a strong magnetic field may be generated from a position of the frontmost end surface 117 a having each of the corners G on the rear side thereof toward the medium M.

In FIG. 8, the corners C and E, each of which has an angle larger than 180° as viewed from the facing surface F, are respectively provided at two or more places on both sides in the track-width direction. As understood from FIG. 8, a height L7 from each of the corners C to the facing surface F may be longer than a height L9 from each of the corners G shown in FIG. 9 to the facing surface F. Accordingly, in FIG. 8, the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the frontmost end surface 117 a having each of the corners C on the rear side thereof may be weakened. The embodiment shown in FIG. 8 is provided with corners E, each of which has an angle larger than 180° as viewed from the facing surface F. However, a height of each of the first regulating surfaces 117 i, which extends from each of the corners E in the height direction, may be smaller than a height of each of the first regulating surfaces 117 i shown in FIG. 9. Therefore, a magnetic domain magnetized in the height direction may largely not be formed. For this reason, the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the position of the frontmost end surface 117 a having each of the corners E on the rear side thereof may be reduced. Consequently, it may be possible to more appropriately suppress the erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal in the embodiment shown in FIG. 8 compared to an embodiment shown in FIG. 9.

An embodiment shown in FIG. 10 is provided with sloping surfaces (recess surfaces) 1171 and 1171. The sloping surfaces are inclined so that a width between the sloping surfaces in the track-width direction (X direction) gradually increases in the height direction (Y direction) from each of the ends 117 a 1 and 171 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 10, the front end surface of the return-pass layer 117 is composed of the frontmost end surface 117 a flush with the facing surface F and the sloping surfaces 117 l and 117 l. The sloping surfaces may be provided on each side of the frontmost end surface 117 a such that a width between the sloping surfaces in the track-width direction increases in the height direction.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 10, sloping surfaces 117 m are formed on both sides of the rear end surface 117 c of the return-pass layer 117 in the track-width direction (X direction) so that a width between the sloping surfaces in the track-width direction is reduced from the facing surface F in the height direction. Each of the sloping surfaces 117 m may intersect each of phantom lines K and K lined from both ends 117 a 1 and 171 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a in the height direction. Accordingly, in FIG. 10, a length L10 in the height direction from each end 117 a 1 of the frontmost end surface 117 a may be shorter than a height L1 from a midpoint thereof. Therefore, a recording magnetic field may not be concentrated on and may not return to the ends 117 a 1 and 117 a 1, and the intensity of the magnetic field generated from the ends 117 a 1 and 117 a 1 toward the medium M may be appropriately weakened, whereby it is possible to appropriately suppress the erasing phenomenon of a recorded signal.

In contrast to FIG. 1, FIG. 11 shows an embodiment in which a return-pass layer 117 is provided below the main magnetic pole layer 110. However, the invention may also be applied to the perpendicular magnetic recording head shown in FIG. 11.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification360/125.2, 360/125.21
International ClassificationG11B5/127
Cooperative ClassificationG11B5/1278, G11B5/3116
European ClassificationG11B5/31D4, G11B5/127P
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