Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS774265 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 8, 1904
Filing dateFeb 10, 1900
Priority dateFeb 10, 1900
Publication numberUS 774265 A, US 774265A, US-A-774265, US774265 A, US774265A
InventorsFrank R Mcberty
Original AssigneeWestern Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toll-collecting appliance for telephone pay-stations.
US 774265 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 774,265. P ATENTED NOV. 8, 1904.

F. R. MOBERTY.

TOLL COLLECTING APPLIANCE FOR TELEPHONE PAY STATIONS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB, 10, 1900. no MODEL. 3 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

PATENTED NOV. 8(1904.

a SHEETS-SHEET 2.

///w L W 15. R. MoBERTY. TOLL COLLECTING APPLIANCE FOR TELEPHONE PAY STATIONS.

- APPLICATION FILED FEB. 10, 1900.

no MODEL.

PATENTED NOV. 8. 1904.

I. R. MGBERTY. TOLL COLLECTING APPLIANCE FOR TELEPHONE PAY STATIONS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB, 10, 1900.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

N0 MODEL.

UNITED STATES Patented November 8, 1904. I

PATENT OFFICE.

FRANK R. MoBERTY, OF EVANSTON ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO WESTERN ILLINOIS.

TOLL-COLLECTING APPLIANCE FOR TELEPHONE PAY-STATIONS.

SPEGIFICATIGN forming part of Letters Patent No. 774,265, dated November 8, 1904.

Application filed February 10, 1900. Serial No. 4,713. (No model.)

To all "whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRANK R. MoBnRTY, a citizen of the United States, residing at Evanston, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois,-( whose post-office address is 259 South Clinton street, Chicago, Illinois,) have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Toll-Collecting Appliances for Telephone Pay-Stations, (Case N o. 78,) of which the following is a full, clear, concise, and exact description.

My invention concerns the operation of telephone-lines extending between telephone pay-stations and a central office, its several objects being to provide for calling the substationwithout the deposit of a coin, for requiring the deposit of a coin as a preliminary to originating a call, and for controlling the receipt or return of the coin from the central office. The complete organization is further designed for association with the circuits and mechanism of the well-known forms of switchboard wherein the signaling is automatic and dependent on the use of the telephone and the substation-transmitters are supplied from a central source of current.

One feature of my invention is a coin-collector for the telephone-substation, having a temporary coin-receiver and transfer mechanism operated by a magnet adapted alter natively to return the coin to the depositor or to throw said coin in a permanent receptacle or cash-box, the alternative action of said transfer mechanism being dependent upon the period of excitation of the magnet. Means are provided at the central oflice for bringing about either a momentary or prolonged excitation of said magnet, whereby the disposition of the deposited coin is controlled. The control of the magnet may be effected as follows: The exciting-current is applied by either of two keys at the central office, and a return circuit for said current is controlled by the coin-actuated contacts of the toll device. One of said keys is, however, adapted to complete a return circuit for the current independent of said coin-actuated contacts. As soon as the magnet is excited the transferring mechanism operated thereby releases the coin, so that the return circuit established by the coin-actuated contacts is broken. The continued excitation of the magnet (and so the disposition of the released coin) is therefore dependent upon whether the return path controlled by the aforesaid key is established or not. The excitation of the magnet is therefore momentary or prolonged, according to which of the keys is actuated.

Another feature of my invention lies in the combination, with a metallic linecircuit and a call-bell in a bridge thereof, of a grounded signaling-circuit formed in part of one of the line conductors, containing a line-signal at the central office and controlled at the substation by switch-contacts in the coin-chute, whereby the act of calling the central office is made dependent on the deposit of a coin, but the act of calling the substation is independent thereof.

A further feature of my invention is the polarization of the coin releasing magnet,

which is connected in abridge of the line-circuit, in connection with the circuits adapted for the automatic operation of the signals, whereby the operation of the magnet by the normal currents in the line is prevented.

v My invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein- Figure 1 is a front elevation of the'coin-collecting appliance. Fig. 2 is a'side elevation thereof on' section-line 2 2 of Fig. 1, the cover, With its attached coin-chute and return-cup, being slightly displaced. Fig. 3 is a side elevation looking in the opposite direction, the side of the box being broken away; and Fig. a is a diagram of the circuit connections of the mechanism with telephonic and signaling appliances at a substation and at a central office.

The coin-collecting mechanism consists, essentially, of a fixed coin-chute a, a movable stop therein and a magnet a controlling the stop, a movable portion or deflector 0 of the coin-chute, and channels beneath the deflector, one leading to a cash-box and the other to an opening in the case of the instrument, where the returned coin is accessible to the user of the telephone.

The fixed portion a of the coin-channel is formed from sheet metal and is secured. by i v 9 v means of screws, to the posts (1' and d", but

away from the base (Z and at right angles thereto. These posts cl and (Z support pillars al and 05*, respectively, which are designed to secure the transverse bar 7), which forms the yoke or heel-piece of magnet b. The beforementioned posts d d carry another transverse piece, 7), parallel to the bar 6. Ears or lugs :1111: project from said piece in position to support the pointed screws 1 1 which serve as pivots for the armature 5 said armature lying across the front of the magnet-poles. Polarity is imparted to the armature by a permanent magnet bfl-connected with the yoke or heel-piece b and having its free extremity located near the center of the armature. The armature b carries near its upper extremity a pin 7)", which projects through an opening in the path of a coin in the coin-chute a. This pin is of such length that While the upper end of the armature is held at its greatest distance from the pole of the corresponding spool of the magnet by the weight I) the pin obstructs the passage of a coin, but when the armature is drawn into its alternate position the pin is drawn out of the path of the coin, leaving the channel free.

The deflector 0 is pivoted upon the lower end of the fixed portion a of the coin-chute and is acted upon by a light spring 0', which keeps it in its normal position against stop 0 to direct the coin into the channel a, leading to the cash-box e. The lower end of armature b is adapted to engage the deflector 0 near its pivotal point, its function being to push the deflector into its alternate position, wherein the coin will be directed into the return-chute 0 when the lower end of the armature is drawn outward through the action of magnet b. A lightlever f, pivoted on trunnions f, formed in the channel a, has one U-shaped extremity projecting into the path of the coin near the stop 7). Its other extremity is associated with the contact-anvil f against which it is thrust during the presence of a coin in the channel.

The vertical portion a of the coin-channel is fixed and is constructed large enough to receive the largest coin which may be required. To adapt the mechanism for operation by coins of difierent sizes, a detachable and independent portion a of the channel is provided, fixed to the cover of the box containing the mechanism. This portion a is downwardly inclined and is also inclined from the vertical plane, so that a coin passing throughit leans to one side. The detachable portion a has an opening beneath adapted to discharge the coin into the channel a. It is perforated by a window a on its downwardly-inclined side, through which coins smaller than that for which the channel a is adapted may fall out l l l before reaching the fixed portion (1/. Thus,

be adapted to receive coins only below a certain size and of those received to discharge coins substantially smaller than the required size through the window (0 permitting only coins of required size to reach the channel'a.

Referring now to the diagram of Fig. 4, the circuits of the toll-collecting appliance and of the mechanism associated With the line at the central office may be traced. The pay-station A is equipped with the usual receiving and transmitting telephones g and g, switch-hook g and polarized call-bell also an inductioncoil g and a condenser Line-wires 1 and 2 are connected in such a way with these instruments as to be normally united through a bridge of the circuit including the call-bell g and condenser g and when the telephone is in use the lines are united through the substation instruments in a manner well known to the art. This is the usual and well-known circuit for telephone-substations adapted for the supply of current to the transmittingtelephones from a central source through the medium of the line-wires. A conductor 3 is led from the bridge of the line including the transmitter between the telephone-switch and the induction-coil through the magnet b to earth, the contact-points ff being included in the conductor. Line-wires l and 2 lead to a spring-jack h in a telephone-switchboard, and line-wire 2 is provided with an extension in the switchboard through the switch-contacts of a cut-off relay 71, through a signal-controlling relay k and a battery Zto earth. As illustrated in the drawings, the usual grounded branch at the central office of line-wire 1 is omitted and current from battery Z finds path only through contactsff of the coin-collecting apparatus. 1t will thus be seen that the subscriber wishing a connection must first deposit a coin to illuminate the signal-lamp, and thus inform the operator that a connection is desired. The magnet of the cut-off relay is included in a portion5of alocal circuit which terminates in a contact-thimble of the springjack 71, and is designed to register with a contact-piece of the plug forming the complementary portion of the local circuit, whereby the relay may be excited when connection is made with the line. The secondary signal controlled by relay 6 is a lamp m, associated with the spring-jack h and contained in alocal battery-circuit traversing the switch-contacts of relay i.

In the switchboard the usual pairs of plugs 01 and n are furnished for uniting lines. the like line contact-pieces of the plugs being united by the link conductors 6 7 of a plugcircuit. Two serially-connected windings of a repeating-coil 0 having four windings are interposed in each of the conductors 6 and 7 The points of junction of the serially-connected windings are united by a bridge 8,con-

taining a battery p,the bridge being grounded between the battery and the conductor 6 of the plug-circuit. I

The usual ringing-key q and listening-key r are associated with the plug-circuit, the former for applying the terminals of a generator of calling-current to the calling-plug a and the latter for bringing the operators telephone into connection with the plug-circuit. Two other keys, s and z, are also interposed in the plug-circuit between the answering-plug a and the repeating-coil 0. The former of these has two switch-springs s and s, of which 8 is adapted to sever the conductor 6 and connect the portion of that conductor leading to the answering-plug with the free pole of generator X, while the other, 8 is arranged merely to interrupt the continuity of conductor 7. The switch-springs 2," and Z of the key Z are arranged one to sever conductor 6 and connect it with generator X and the other to sever conductor 7 and connect the portion leading to the plug with earth.

Supervisory relays u and u are included in conductor 7 of the plug-sircuit, one in the path of current from battery 7) to each of two united telephone-stations. These relays control supervisory signal-lamps o and o, associated with plugs n and a, respectively, in

conductors 9 and 10, respectively, which form the complementary portions of the local battery-circuit closed in making connection with the line before mentioned. The relays control the lamps by closing low-resistance shunts about them.

The subscriber has heretofore been required only to lift the telephone from its switch-hook to illuminate the signal lamp in the wellknown manner. The absence of the grounded portion of line-wire 1 makes it imperative to close the circuit of battery Z to ground by dropping a coin into chute a, through which it falls until stopped by pin Z2 thereby causing the spring f to come into contact with anvil f Current now flows from battery Z through signal-controlling relay 7e, causing it to attract its armature and illuminate lamp 721, through line-wire2 and contacts f f 2 to ground. This constitutes a notification to the operator that a connection is required and that the requisite coin has been placed in the coinchute. The samecurrent in the local circuit 9 5 which excites the cut-off-relay may also excite the supervisory signal-lamp a; but if the telephone be removed from its switch at the substation when the operator answers the re lay a will be excited as soon as the plug-circuit is brought into connection with the line and will close the shunt about the signal Q}. She then learns what line is called for and inserts the plug a into spring-jack of that line and throws on ringin -current by depressing key q. \Vhen the called subscriber answers and lamp 0; becomes extinguished, showing the operator that the twosubscribers are in communication, she depresses the key 8, which con nects the tip of the answering-plug with the free pole of generator X. Current then flows from generator to the tip of the plug by way of switch-spring s, over line-wire 1, conductor 3, and coils of magnet b to ground through contact-points f and f The mag. net 5 is thus energized and draws up its armature 7/, so that pin If is withdrawn from the path of the coin, and at the same time pushes the deflector over the opening of the returnchute 0 The coin then releases the lever or spring f, which at once breaks the connection between itself and anvil f. This leaves no path for the current, and the magnet becomes deenergized and its armature falls back into its normal position, which allows the deflector 0 to be drawn back against the stop 0 by the spring 0', and the coin is guided into the cashbox. Should the operator be unable to connect the calling-subscriber with the party desired, she depresses the other key, t,one switchspring of which connects the tip of the plug with generator X and the other connects the sleeve with ground at 52 A return-circuit 2 forc-urrent through the magnet Z is thus provided independent of contacts 7' f, so that said magnet thus remains energized after the separation of said contacts upon the release of the coin and the lower end of the armature holds the deflector in position to drop the coin into the return-chute e whence it is deposited in cup 6 in the cover of the box.

It will, be understood that the magnet Z is of such polarity as to remain inert when traversed by the currents from batteries Z and p in the line.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure byLetters Patent, is-

1. The combination with a metallic-circuit telephone-line extending from a central office to a pay-station, of a coin-collector at the substation having a polarized magnet in a bridge of the metallic circuit, and mechanism oper, ated by said magnet for controlling the disposal of a deposited coin, a source of current at the central office of suitable character to operate said electromagnet, and a switch for connecting the same in a bridge of the metallic circuit, a battery connected in a bridge of the metallic circuit at the central office, a supervisory signaling instrument in the circuit between said battery and one of the line conductors, and a switch at the substation, controlling abridge of the te e )hone-circuit, the magnet of the coin-collecio' being unre: sponsive to the current of said battery, whereby signals may be transmitted over the line without affecting the coin-collector, substantially as set forth. I y 2. The'combination with a toll device having a'temporary coin-receiver, of an electromagnet and mechanism operated by a momentary excitation of said magnet for discharg ing the coin from said receiver, a channel for receiving the released coin, a deflector arranged to be moved by the magnet, whereby a prolonged excitation of said magnet causes the coin to be diverted from said channel, a circuit for said magnet and means for causing either a momentary or prolonged excitation of said magnet, to control the disposition of the coin.

3. In a coin-collecting appliance, a coinchannel and a stop therein, a movable switch or deflector below the stop in the said channel, an electromagnet actuating both said stop and said deflector, a circuit of the magnet and means for applying current therein, switchcontacts actuated by the coin in its passage adapted to deprive said magnet of current, and a circuit of the magnet adapted to maintain the excitement of said magnet independently of said switch-contacts; whereby the coin may be released and diverted into either channel, as described.

4:. The combination with a telephone-line, of a coin-collector at the station thereof having a coin-channel, a stop in the channel, and a deflector or switch below the stop, a magnet controlling the stop and the deflector, switch-contacts actuated by the coin when falling through the channel, a circuit over one line conductor and an earth-return including the electromagnet and controlled by said switch-contacts to deprive the magnet of current during the fall of the coin, another circuit of the magnet through the other line conductor independent of said switch-contacts, and means at the central office for applying current in either circuit; whereby the coin may be released and deposited or returned, as desired.

5. In combination, with a telephone-line, a source of current and a signal in a ground branch from one line conductor at a central office, an electromagnet in a ground branch from the line at the substation, a coin-chute and a stop and a deflector or switch therein controlled by said electromagnet, switch-contacts in the coin-chute closed together by a coin resting against the stop, said switch-contacts being adapted to complete the normal break in the ground branch containing the electromagnet, and a circuit connection of the magnet with the other line conductor, whereby the magnet is brought into a bridge of the line, said magnet being polarized to retain said stop in position in the channel when traversed by the normal current of the line; means at the central station for applying current either in a grounded circuit including said switch-contactS to excite the magnet and release the coin, or in a bridge of the line independent of said switch-contacts in the coinchute; whereby the deposit of a coin excites the line-signal, and the deposited coin may be received or returned, as described.

6. The combination with a metallic-circuit telephone-line extending from a central ofiice to a pay-station, of a coin-collector at the substation comprising a coin-chute with a coinactuated switch adapted to connect one of the line conductors torearth, a polarized magnet in a bridge of the metallic circuit, and mechanism operated. by said magnet for controlling the disposal of the deposited coin, a linesignal and a ground ed source of current at the central office connected with the line conductor which is adapted to be grounded at the substation by th e coin-actuated switch, a source of current of suitable polarity for operating said polarized coin-controlling magnet, and a switch at the central oflice for connecting said source of current in a bridge of the line conductors, substantially as described.

7 The combination with a metallic-circuit telephone-line extending from a central oflice to a pay-station, of a coincollector at the substation comprising a coin-chute with a coinactuated switch adapted to connect one of the line conductors to earth, a polarized magnet in a bridge of the metallic circuit, and mechanism operated by said magnet for controlling the disposal of the deposited coin, a source of current of suitable character to operate said electromagnet, and a switch at the central offlee for connecting the same in a bridge of the metallic circuit, a battery 19 connected in a bridge of the circuit at the central ofiice, a supervisory signaling instrument in the circuit between one pole of said battery and the line conductor which is adapted to be grounded by the coin-actuated switch at the substation, the other pole of said battery being grounded, whereby the presence of a coin in the coin-chute at the pay-station is indicated by the supervisory signal at the central oifice, a bridge of the circuit at the pay-station containing the telephone apparatus, and a switch adapted to close said bridge, substantially as set forth.

In witness whereof I hereunto subscribe my name this 6th day of January, A. D. 1900.

FRANK It. MOBERTY.

Witnesses ELLA EDLER, GERTRUDE EYSTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8150206Mar 30, 2004Apr 3, 2012Thomson LicensingMethod and apparatus for representing image granularity by one or more parameters
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationH04M17/023