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Publication numberUS776555 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1904
Filing dateOct 26, 1903
Priority dateOct 26, 1903
Publication numberUS 776555 A, US 776555A, US-A-776555, US776555 A, US776555A
InventorsRichard S Settle
Original AssigneeHayden Settle, Richard S Settle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Soldering-pliers.
US 776555 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. s. SETTLE, SOLDERING PLIERS.

APPLICATION FILED OUT. 26. 1903 N0 MODEL.

Hill iHHHHHJ H W/ TNE SSE 8: NW? N TOR NITED STAT S Patented December 6,1904.

RICHARD S. SETTLE, OF KEARNEY, MISSOURI, ASSIG-NOR OF ONE HALF TO HAYDEN SETTLE, OF KEARNEY, MISSOURI.

SOLDERlNG-PLIERSL' SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 776,555, dated-December 6, 1904.

Application filed October 26, 1903. Serial No. 178,571. (N0 fldeli) To (l/ZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, RICHARD S. SETTLE, a citizen of the United States of America, residing at Kearney, in the county of Clay and State of Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Soldering-Pliers; and 1 do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others to make and use the same. reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification.

The invention has for its object an efiicient tool or implement for holding and drawing together separate and disjointed articles which require soldering or welding, such as in various branches of workshop construction are frequently difficult to bring into perfect contact and adjustment; and it consists in the novel construction and combination of parts, such as will be first fully described and then specifically pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a view in per spective of the novel pliers. Fig. 2 is a plan View showing the pliers without the socket' joint and as applied to one of the various uses in the drawing together of the nose-piece and eyeglass-frame of spectacles. Fig. 3 is a similar view of the pliers as seen in Fig. 2, showing the operative position of the jaws in dotted lines. Fig. 4 is a side view of the pliers as seen in Figs. 2 and 3, showing in dotted lines an elevated position of one jaw when above the plane of the other. Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view of the rear end portion of the handle of the pliers. Fig. 6 is a view in perspective of the pliers as seen in Fig. 1, showing a modificationof the handle. Fig. 7 is a detail broken view of the joint structure as seen in Figs. 1 and 6.

Similar characters of reference indicate cor' opening 10, and in the plates? and 8 are openings registering with the screw-threaded openings 10, but slightly larger in circumference,

in which openings is fitted an adjusting-screw 12, provided with a milledhead 13. The forward ends of the plates 7 and 8 are sprung outwardly from near the operating-plate 9 and retain normally a wider position apart than adjacent to said plate.

Extending forwardly from the forward ends of the plates 7 and 8 and integral therewith are the parallel graspingjaws 1 1 and 15. These jaws are of considerable-length and of an increased thickness to that of plates 7 and 8, the outer-surfaces terminating in a shoulder 16 upon the forward end of the said plates, and from said shoulder forwardly the sides of the jaw curve inwardly and are narrow in width. The outer surface of each jaw at the forward ends is curved inwardly to the lines of the inner surfaces, as indicated at 17.

In each jaw is a longitudinal slot 18, extending from the forward end through the upper and lower surfaces and about two-thirds the distance in the direction of the handle 6, the sides of each jaw upon the outer surface increasing in width in a slight degree in the direction of their forward ends, so that each portion separated by the slot 18 is slightly wider than at the rear end of said slot and each portion sprung normally away from the other. Upon each jaw is a slidable link 19, which ex: tends around the jaw near the rear end of slot 18 and when moved forwardly draws the forward ends of the separate parts of each jaw.

and the lateral movement of the jaw accomplished independently and by the finger, one of the jaws, 14:, is made separate from the springplate 7 in the forward end of which is an inwardly-curved recess or socket 26, a portion of the upper surface of the plate being cut spectacles into close relation,

- cured together away concentric with the said recess and inend of the aw 14 is curved in the are of a "circle and halved from the lower surface inwardly to form a bearing 29 and fit within the socket 26 and upon the seat 28. An adjustingscrew 30 extends through the bearing 29 and within athreaded opening in the seat 28.

The adaptability of the tool for the repair of spectacles by the optician is clearly shown in Fig. 2. In this instance the rims for the lenses are inserted in the slot 18 in one jaw of the tool and the link 19 pushed forward to cause the jaw to grasp the rim and the nosepiece inserted in the slot of the other jaw and the link pushed forward to enable the jaw to grasp the. nose-piece, in which position of the jaws the sliding link or clasp 20. is pushed forward, which action draws the jaws toward each other and the nose-piece and rim of the so that the application of the solder may be accomplished without the liability of displacement of the joined parts of the spectacles. An advantage in the use of the tool is found especially in the repair of broken rims of spectacles which ordinarily require dexterous manipulation in order to draw the broken parts together and retain their position' for the application of the solder. The convenience of the tool is further shown in Fig. 3, which exemplifies a method of soldering or welding the contiguous ends of wire strands, adapting the tool for the use of wire-workers and analogous purposes.

The frequent disparity in thickness of separate articles required to be joined together, as well as the variance in planes, alfords unique adaptability of the tool. For this purpose the adjusting screw 13 is loosened, which enables one jaw to be raised in position above the plane of the other, the slidable link 20 adjusting itself to the changed position of the jaws, as seen in Fig. 4C, and upon tightening the adjusting-screw the position of the jaws is retained.

In Figs.'6 and 7 the separating-plate 9, as seen in Fig. 1, is dispensed with between the plates 21 and 22 of the handle, which are seby the rivet 23, and a portion of these plates 21 and 22 are bent intermediate their length in an outwardly-curved line, in which construction the plates retain a position normally sprung apart. The jaws are the same as in Fig. 1. Such other modifications of the invention may be employed as are within the scope of the invention.

Having fully described my invention, what I now claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. A tool,the handle of which comprises separate spring-expanded plates, parallel jaws upon the forward ends of said plates, compris- I ing separate spring-expanded grasping parts, and means for drawing said parts and the jaws toward'each other.

2. A tool,the handle of which comprises separate spring-expanded, adjustably-connected plates, and parallel jaws upon the forward ends of said plates, and means for drawing said jaws toward each other.

3. A tool,the handle of which comprises separate spring expanded plates, parallel jaws upon the forward ends of said plates, said jaws comprising separate longitudinally-extended, grasping parts, and a device for drawing said parts toward each other.

4. A tool,thehandle of which comprises separate spring expanded plates, parallel jaws upon the forward ends of said plates, said jaws having a longitudinal slot separating the forward ends, the separate parts of the jaws be ing outwardly sprung, and a slidable link on the said jaws, drawing said parts toward each other.

5. A tool, the handle of which comprises separate spring-expanded plates, parallel grasping-jaws upon the forward ends of said plates, said jaws being adjustably connected with said plates.

6. A tool, the handle of which comprises separate spring-expanded plates, parallel grasp ing-jaws upon the forward ends of said plates, a socket-joint connecting the forward end of one of said plates with the inner end of one of said jaws, and an adjusting-screw.

7 A tool,the handle of which comprises separate spring-expanded plates, parallel grasping-jaws upon the forward ends of said plates, having longitudinal slots separating the forward ends, the separate parts of the jaws being outwardly sprung, and each part increased in thickness at its forward end, a slidable link for drawing the separate parts of the jaw toward each other, and a slidable clasp acting to draw the jaws toward each other.

8. A tool, the handle of which comprises separate spring-expanded plates, an intermediate separating-plate at their rear ends, and an adjusting-screw connecting said plates with each other,longitudinally-extended, parallel grasping-jaws upon the forward ends of said springplates, each of which jaws having a longitudinal slot separating the forward ends, the said parts of the jaw being outwardly sprung and of increased width at the forward ends, a link on each jaw adapted to draw theseparate parts thereof toward each other, and a slidable clasp acting to draw the jaws toward each other.

RICHARD s SETTLE.

Witnesses: I

ALBERT ROWELL, FRANK CROWLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2576571 *Apr 2, 1947Nov 27, 1951Antoine Chauvin AndreFile binder
US2583680 *Apr 7, 1950Jan 29, 1952Frank BrennanLure holder for fishermen
US2614516 *Oct 20, 1948Oct 21, 1952Western Electric CoArticle holding apparatus
US2665692 *Dec 10, 1951Jan 12, 1954L Esperance Francis ASuturing forceps
US5884954 *Jun 4, 1997Mar 23, 1999Trozera; ThomasLocking tweezers for tying fly-fishing hooks
US7625028 *Oct 22, 2007Dec 1, 2009Yong Hoon ChoFlipping double headed tweezers
US7641248 *Oct 22, 2007Jan 5, 2010Yong-Hoon ChoCompact double tweezers
US8091757Jul 5, 2011Jan 10, 2012Rafal StawarskiWire alignment tool for use during soldering
US8727408Mar 1, 2013May 20, 2014John O. RuidTongs including tapered fingers
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB25B5/068