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Publication numberUS781505 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 31, 1905
Filing dateApr 25, 1904
Priority dateApr 25, 1904
Publication numberUS 781505 A, US 781505A, US-A-781505, US781505 A, US781505A
InventorsPhilip Carlton Engle
Original AssigneePhilip Carlton Engle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Timepiece.
US 781505 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 781,505. PATENTED JAN. 31, 1905.. P. G. ENGLB.

TIMBPIECB.

ABPLIOATION FILED APR. Z5, 1904.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

No. 781,505. PATBNTBD JAN. 31, 1905. P. G. ENGLE.

TIMBPIEGE.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 25, 1904.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

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UNITED STATES Patented January 31, 1905.

PHILIP CARLTON ENGLE, OF LIMA, OHIO.

TE'MEPIECE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 781,505, dated January 31, 1905.

Application filed April 25, 1904. Serial No. 204,834.

T0 all when?, it may con/cern:

Be it known that I, PHILIr CARLTON ENG-LE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Lima, in the county of Allen and State of Ohio, have invented new and useful Improvements in Timepieces, of which the following is a specilication.

This invention relates to timepieces, and especially to that kind thereof known as magic or mysterious clocks, the object being to provide a simple and effective article of such character the parts of which are compactly disposed and are so arranged as to assure the accurate keeping of time by the improved device.

The invention includes other objects and advantages, which will be set forth at length in the following description, while the novelty of such invention will be embraced by the claims succeeding1 said description.

ln the drawings accompanying' and forming a part of this specification I illustrate in full one simple and convenient adaptation of the invention which will be explicitly disclosed in said description. I wish to state at this point, however, that I de not limit myself to the showing thus made, for certain variations as to a number of points may be adopted within the scope of my claims. Y

Referring to said drawings, Figure l is a face View of a timepiece including the inven- F ig. 2 is a vertical central section on an enlarged scale. Fig. 3 is an inside face view of the minute-hand. Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional elevation, the section being taken on the line l 4 of Fig. 2. Fig. 5 is a detail View in perspective of afinger-operated member for causing the set-ting of the hands, and Fig. 6 is an insideface view of a plurality of gear members hereinafter more particularly described.

Like characters refer to like parts throughout the several figures of the drawings.

rI"he timepiece includes in its makeup adial, as 2, which isprcfeiably, though not necessarily, made from transparent glass. IV ith rlhe mount- -ing illustrated of the several hands will be hereinafter set forth.

rlhe dial Q bears upon one of its faces the usual numerals and also calendar designations, the latter to indicate the names of the days of the week and also the numbers of the days of the month. The Ininute-hand 3, as will hereinafter appear, incases or incloses what might be properly considered the works of the timepiece-that is to say, the works are hidden from view so as not to be observable. In order to heighten the mysterious effect of the timepiece, I form in the several hands thereof a multiplicity of closely-arran ged perforations and perforated enlargements, so as to leave as little as possible of the hands solid, which apparently indicates that said hands are incapable of containing any of the numerous parts of the works.

The dial 2 is perforated, and the body of the sleeve 7 extends through the perforation, what might be considered the outer end of said sleeve being externally threaded to receive the nut 8, bearing against one face of the dial 2, while the annular shoulder 9 upon the forward side of said sleeve bears upon the opposite side of said dial. The means for sustaining the hands, as will hereinafter appear, are connected with the said sleeve. Arlhe forward portion of the sleeve 7 is internally threaded to be engaged by the externallythreaded inner end of the elongated tube 10. From this it will be understood that said tube 10 is relatively stationary. At apoint between its ends the tube 10 is provided with a circular flange ll, which flange, as will hereinafter appear, constitutes a support or carrier for certain power-transmitting elements. A second tube is shown at 12, said second tube being shorter than the one just described, for a purpose that will hereinafter appear. Such second tube turns around and upon the first tube and is securely united in some suitable Inanner to the inner calendar-hand 6. A third tube is represented at 13 as rotative upon the second tube. The third tube is securely united to the outer calendar-hand The two tubes 1Q and 13 extend between the flange 11 and the sleeve 7. Their outer ends have annular olfstanding flanges 14, arranged in proximity to each other and peri pherally toothed. The teeth of these flanges mesh with the teeth of two gears, each denoted by 15 and suitably securely united to an arbor or spindle 16, rotatably carried by the flange 11, near the margin thereof. r1`he gears 15 are located, as will be apparent, upon one side of the iiange 11, while the means for actuating said gears are situated upon the opposite side of said flange and will be hereinafter described. A fourth tube is illustrated at 17, and it is securely united to the hour-hand et and rotates around the tube l() in advance of the circular flange 11. T he fourth tube 17 rotates upon the first tube 10, and its forward end terminates adjacent the corresponding` portion of said tube 10 for a purpose that will hereinafter appear. The shaft 18 is normally stationary, and its forward end projects beyond the sleeve 10 and rotatably7 receives the minute-hand 3.

The works of the watch, as previously indicated, are inclosed by the minute-hand 3, and for this purpose said hand is longitudinallyrecessed between its ends, and within the recesses the plates 19 are suitably fastened. There are three of these plates, and have given them all the same characterwnamely, an inner plate, an outer plate, and an intermediate plate or bridge. The works are located between the inner and outer plates and are supported thereby and partly by the intermediate plate or bridge.

rlhere are two barrels (each denoted by Q0) arranged at opposite sides of the relatively stationary shaft 18, said barrels having peripherally thereof gear-teeth, as 21, adapted to mesh with a pinion 22, suitably securely fastened to the relatively stationary shaft 18, which latter is held from longitudinal movement by means of a spring 35 and disk 3T, hereinafter described. The shafts for the barrels are designated by Q3, and they carry at their outer ends gears, as 211, meshing with the intermediate pinion 25, by turning which latter the barrels can be wound up.

The outer plate 19 has a tubular extension around which the collar 26 is rotative, the latter being held in place by a screw tapped into said tubular extension. The inner end of this collar securely carries the pinion 25. Therefore by turning the collar 26 with the thumb and foreiinger or otherwise the mainsprings in the barrels will be wound up in order to start the timepiece. .l have shown in Fig. 2, at the left thereof, the usual train of gears which is common in an ordinary watch or time )ieee and therefore I do not deem it necbeen set forth as relatively stationary.

a toothed circular flange 2T, the tube l?, to which, itwill be remembered, the hour-hand l lis connected, beingl provided with a similar flange 28. The two Vlianges are peripherally toothed to form gears, which llanges or gears mesh with gears, as 29 and 30 of the minutewheel, pivotally supported upon the rear side of the minute-hand 3, eccentric with the axis of motion thereof. These two gears 25) and 30 are securely-united together to move as a single member, or they may be for this purpose made integral. ',lhe gears 29 and 30 of the minute-wheel are arranged in size so that when the minute-hand makes one revolution the hour-hand will make one-twelfth of a revolution.

The means represented for effecting' the action of the calendar-hands will be set forth. ln fact, I have set forth hereinbefore certain gears 15, whereby the sleeves connected with the two calendar-hands could be operated. ,lt will be remembered that these two gears are carried upon the inner end of the shaft or arbor 16. The outer end of said shaft or arbor carries a wheel 31, which is one of two familiar in aso-called Geneva stop. lheother wheel of said stop is designated by 32, and it has on its outer side four equidistant radiallydisposed ribs or spokes 33, with which an actuator or pin 31, carried by the hour-hand, is cooperative. This actuator or pin 31, it will be seen, is located in a longitudinal recess in the hour-hand, and,in fact, said recess incloses certain of the adjacent parts of thetimepiece. 'hen the hour-hand has made a full turn, the pin 3a thereofwill be carried againsta rib or spoke 33 on the wheel 32, thereby turning the latter. Upon the turning of the wheel 32 it turns the wheel 31, which, it will be understood, is securely carried on the outer end of the shaft 16. Upon the turning of the shaft 16 the two gears 15 are simultaneously turned in order to move the two calendar-hands the requisite distance.

The timepiece is set by turning the spindle or shaft 18. The inner end of this spindle or shaft is surrounded by the coiled spring 35, one terminal portion of which is connected with the spindle. 'lhe other terminal portion of the spring 35 is litted in a slit extending' inward in the forward edge of the flange 36. The circular 'liange extends forward from the disk 37. .lt will be apparent that by turning the disk 37 the spindle 18, through theagency of the spring 35, will be (an'respomlingly turned in order to set the minute-hand, and there by the other hands controlled therefrom. By splitting the flange 36 the latter will engage the plain portion of the inner wall of the sleeve T with a suiiicient pressure to prevent under ordinary conditions the disk 37 from turning and also from lateral n'iovement. Should the hand 3 be accidentally moved by a gust of wind, the spring 35 will be conipressed in order to subsequently return the IOO IIO

minute-hand to its correct position when the force acting thereagainst has been removed.

. ln the foregoing' description I have used the terms front7 and back or words equivalent thereto. This is simply done for convenience. for it will be apparent that the hands may be run either forward or backward by reversing' the mainspringslthat is, the hands can be connnected with either side of thev dial 2.

As two barrels are provided, .l am enabled to make the hands very long, while by this relation I do not add anything' to the width or thickness of the hands. Therefore the latter in practice are as light as possible, and by reason of their leng'th the timepiece can be seen at a very much greater distance than would be possible where only one barrel is present. .By reason of the perforations and perforated enlargements in the hands 1 heighten the mysterious effect of the article, as hereinbefore stated. Beside this the perforations in question reduce the weight of the hands. By virtue of the mounting' of the collar or stem 26 the latter has the appearance of a shaft for sustaining the hands.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim isif. A timepieceincluding' a minute-hand, actuating means for said minute-hand, an hourhand, arelatively stationary tube, a tube connected with the hour-hand and rotative around the other tube, each tube having a gear, two securely-united gears rotatably carried by the minute-hand meshing with said other gears and a manually-operable spindle inclosed by said first-mentioned tube, having an operative connection with said minute-hand to thereby set the same and hence the hour-hand.

2. A timepiece including a minute-hand, actuating means for said minute-hand, an hourhand, a relatively stationary tube, a tube connected with the hour-hand and rotative around the other'tube, each tube having a gear, two rigidly-united ygears rotatably carried by the minute-hand meshing with said other gears, and a manually-operable spindle inelosed by said first-mentioned tube, having an operative connection with said minute-hand to thereby set the same and hence the hour-hand combined with calendar-hands, and means operative by the hour-hand for effecting' the movement of the calendar-hands.

3. A timepiece including' a minute-hand, a relatively stationary shaft provided with a pinion, two spring-barrels carried by thehand provided with gears meshing with said pinion, an hour-hand provided with a tube, a second and relatively stationary tube situated between the other tube and said relatively stationary shaft, said tubes having g'ears, and two rigidly-united gears carried by the minute-hand meshing with said other gears.

if. A timepiece including' a sleeve, a tube connected with the sleeve, a shaft extending through and beyond said tube, provided with a pinion at its forward end, aminute-hand rotative upon said shaft, provided internally with two barrels mesh-ing with the pinion, a spring in each barrel, gears connected with the springs, a stem provided with a pinion for operating' said last-mentioned gears, a second tube rotatably supported by the first tube, a third tube rotatably supported by the second tube, calendar-hands securely connected with the second and third tubes, respectively, an hour-hand provided with a tube rotative on the first tube, means operative by the minutehand for actuating' the hour-hand, and mechanism operative with the hour-hand for actun ating' the calendar-hands.

A timepiece including' a sleeve, a tube connected with the sleeve, a shaft extending through and beyond said tube, provided with a pinion at its forward end, a minute-hand rotative upon said shaft, provided internally with two barrels meshing with the pinion, a spring in each barrel, gears connected with the springs, astem provided with a pinion for operating said last-mentioned gears, a second tube rotatably supported by the first tube, a third tube rotatably supported by the second tube, calendar-hands securely connected with the second and third tubes, respectively, an hour-hand provided with a tube rotative on the first tube. means operative by theminufehand for actuating' the hour-hand, mechanism operative with the hour-hand for actuating' the calendar hands, and manually operable means connected with the said shaft for operating the same.

6. A timepiece including a sleeve, a tube connected with the sleeve, a shaft extending through and beyond said tube, provided with a pinion at its forward end, a minute-hand rotative upon said shaft, provided internally with two barrels meshing' with the pinion, a spring in each barrel, a gear connected with the springs and stem, provided with a pinion for operating said last-mentioned g'ear, a second tube rotatably supported by the first tube, a third tube rotatably supported by the second tube, calendar-hands securely connected with the second and third tubes, respectively, an hour-hand provided with a tube rotative on the first tube, means operative bythe minute-hand for actuating the hour-hand, mech.- anism operative with the hour-hand for actuating the ealemlar-hands, and a spring' connected with said shaft for imparting a retractile movement thereto when the same is accidentally advanced.

7. A timepiece including a sleeve, a tube connected with the sleeve, a shaft extending through and beyond said tube, provided with a pinion at its forward end, a minute-hand operative upon said shaft, provided internally with two barrels meshing' with the pinion.Y a spring in each barrel, gears connected with the springs, a stem provided with a pinion for IOO IIO

tube rotatably supported by the lirst tube, a rotative about said tube, a minute-hand suitthird tube rotatably supported by the second ably associated with said hour-hand, calendartube, calemlar-hands securely connected with hands suitably associated with the hour-hand,

5 the second and third tubes, respectively, an cach having a gear connected thereto, gears 2O hour-hand provided with a tube rotative on supported by said l'langc, and means connectthe lirst tube, means operative bythe minutel ed with thehour-hand foropcrating saidgears. hand ior actuating the hour-hand, mechanism l] In testimony whereof l have hereunto set operating' said last-mentioned gears', a second between its ends with a flange, an hour-hand operative with the hour-hand for actuating my hand in presence oi' two subscribingl wit- IO the calendar-hands, a disk provided with a nesses.

split flange seated in said sleeve and friction- I PIHL'IQ y H s y l Y f. ,a f1 l NILVY I". ally engaging the interior thereof, a coiled y l (J x iL O l [L spring' surrounding,l the shaft and connected, Vvltne'sses: respectively, thereto and to said ange. XVM. E. REILLY, 15 S. A timepiece including a tube provided l NV. H. MILLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2749555 *May 18, 1955Jun 12, 1956Edward T OliveiraDate hat
US5130956 *May 1, 1991Jul 14, 1992Masahiro UedaClock
Classifications
International ClassificationG04B45/04
Cooperative ClassificationG04B45/04
European ClassificationG04B45/04