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Publication numberUS7825359 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 12/458,618
Publication dateNov 2, 2010
Filing dateJul 17, 2009
Priority dateNov 20, 2006
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS7635104, US20100001117, US20100123038
Publication number12458618, 458618, US 7825359 B2, US 7825359B2, US-B2-7825359, US7825359 B2, US7825359B2
InventorsTom Kusic
Original AssigneeTom Kusic
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aircraft spiraling mechanism with jet assistance - E
US 7825359 B2
Abstract
An aircraft in the form of multi-stage missile 1 with a spiral inducing assembly 2 which is capable of inducing the missile to travel in a continuous spiraling motion without the missile rolling. A ramjet 6 b is attached to a tube 3 that is able to rotate around the encircled part of the fuselage. The ramjet 6 b is able to rotate in a pivoting manner on the rotate-able tube 3 with respect to the rotate-able tube 3, thereby changing their pitch relative to the longitudinal axis of the rotate-able tube 3. Ramjet 6 b is rotated to a greater than another ramjet on the right side of the tube 3. The difference in degree of rotation between the ramjets makes the ramjet 6 b exert a greater force on the rotate-able tube 3 than the ramjet on the right side when the ramjets are rotated in the same direction. The imbalance between the rotational forces thus causes the rotate-able tube 3 to rotate. When rotated, the ramjets would exert a lateral force on the rotate-able tube 3. Thus, as well as forcing the rotate-able tube 3 to rotate, the ramjets would also push the rotate-able tube sideways. But as the rotate-able tube is pushed sideways, it rotates, and hence the lateral direction of push constantly revolves, causing a spiraling motion of the missile when in flight.
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Claims(18)
1. An aircraft comprising a tube, which tube encircles part of the aircraft and is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the aircraft, and which tube comprises a plurality of means for producing thrust, with at least one means for producing thrust connected to the tube such that the at least one means for producing thrust is able to be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and with at least one additional means for producing thrust connected to the tube such that the at least one additional means for producing thrust is able to be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and which said aircraft comprises a means to rotate the at least one means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube and a means to rotate the at least one additional means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube such that the at least one means for producing thrust can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube in a same direction as a direction of rotation in a pivoting manner of the at least one additional means for producing thrust relative to the tube and such that the at least one means for producing thrust is able to be rotated in a pivoting manner to a greater degree than the at least one additional means for producing thrust, relative to the tube.
2. An aircraft comprising a tube, which tube encircles part of the aircraft and is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the aircraft, and which tube comprises a plurality of means for producing thrust, with at least one means for producing thrust connected to the tube such that the at least one means for producing thrust is able to be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and with at least one additional means for producing thrust connected to the tube such that the at least one additional means for producing thrust is able to be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and which said aircraft comprises a means to rotate the at least one means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube and a means to rotate the at least one additional means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube such that the at least one means for producing thrust can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube in a same direction as a direction of rotation in a pivoting manner of the at least one additional means for producing thrust relative to the tube and which at least one means for producing thrust, by producing thrust, is able to exert a force on the tube that is greater than a force that the at least one additional means for producing thrust is able to exert on the tube by producing thrust.
3. The aircraft of claim 1 wherein the means to rotate the at least one means for producing thrust and the means to rotate the at least one additional means for producing thrust are such that rotation of the at least one means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube can cause rotation of the at least one additional means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube in a same direction as a direction of rotation in a pivoting manner of the at least one means for producing thrust relative to the tube.
4. The aircraft of claim 2 wherein the means to rotate the at least one means for producing thrust and the means to rotate the at least one additional means for producing thrust are such that rotation of the at least one means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube can cause rotation of the at least one additional means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube in a same direction as a direction of rotation in a pivoting manner of the at least one means for producing thrust relative to the tube.
5. The aircraft of claim 1 wherein the said same direction is such that rotation of the at least one means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube is substantially in the same direction as a direction of rotation of the at least one additional means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube.
6. The aircraft of claim 2 wherein the said same direction is such that rotation of the at least one means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube is substantially in the same direction as a direction of rotation of the at least one additional means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube.
7. The aircraft of claim 3 wherein the said same direction is such that rotation of the at least one means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube is substantially in the same direction as a direction of rotation of the at least one additional means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube.
8. The aircraft of claim 4 wherein the said same direction is such that rotation of the at least one means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube is substantially in the same direction as a direction of rotation of the at least one additional means for producing thrust in a pivoting manner relative to the tube.
9. The aircraft of claim 1 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
10. The aircraft of claim 2 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
11. The aircraft of claim 3 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
12. The aircraft of claim 4 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
13. The aircraft of claim 5 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
14. The aircraft of claim 6 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
15. The aircraft of claim 7 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
16. The aircraft of claim 8 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
17. An aircraft comprising a tube, which tube encircles part of the aircraft and is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the aircraft, and which tube comprises at least one means for producing thrust, which said at least one means for producing thrust is able to produce thrust in a direction such that a force could be exerted on the tube by the at least one means for producing thrust, and which force is such that the tube could be forced to rotate in one direction relative to the encircled part of the aircraft, and the tube comprises at least one additional means for producing thrust, which at least one additional means for producing thrust is able to produce thrust in a direction such that as a result of the thrust produced by the at least one additional means for producing thrust another force could be exerted on the tube by the at least one additional means for producing thrust, which another force is such that the tube could be forced to rotate in a direction that is opposite to the said one direction if no other force acted on the tube, and which force exerted on the tube by the at least one means for producing thrust is greater than the another force exerted on the tube by the at least one additional means for producing thrust.
18. The aircraft of claim 17 wherein the said aircraft is a missile.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This is a continuation patent application, being a continuation of the U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/601,804 filed Nov. 20, 2006 now U.S. Pat. No. 7,635,104.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not applicable.

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING

Not applicable.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention is related to the field of aviation dealing with missiles and military attack airplanes.

The aim of this invention is to provide an aircraft that has higher chance of surviving attacks from anti-aircraft weapons. The aircraft can be in the form a missile or airplane. The aircraft according to this invention is fitted with a mechanism that enables the aircraft to travel in a continuous spiraling motion while flying when the mechanism is engaged. The mechanism is such that once activated, the spiraling motion is automatic. The mechanism can also be disengaged by a pilot when so desired if the aircraft carries a pilot. The spiraling motion is achieved during flight without having to roll the aircraft.

The mechanism could also be fitted to a missile. A spiraling missile would be more difficult to destroy by lasers, radar controlled machine guns and anti-missile missiles than a missile travelling in a straight line.

2. Description of the Related Art

U.S. Pat. No. 5,322,243 in the name of Stoy shows a missile with variable pitch fins on a rotate-able tube that are moved by independent actuators, and a computer to control the operation of the actuators. While the intention of Stoy wasn't to provide a missile that could travel in a continuous spiraling motion, such a motion could be achieved by the missile shown in Stoy's patent with appropriate programming of the controlling computer. The current invention provides a mechanical means for inducing a spiraling motion in an aircraft that does not need a computer to control the position of the fins, jet or rockets on a rotate-able tube to induce a spiraling motion in the aircraft.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In this invention the spiraling motion of a fast flying airplane or missile is achieved by using moveable thrust producing motors on a rotate-able tube, with the tube encircling a part of the main body of the aircraft and with the tube able to rotate around the encircled part of the aircraft.

The thrust producing motors are attached to the rotate-able tube so that they can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the rotate-able tube. That is, if the rotate-able tube was kept in a fixed position on the airplane so as not to rotate, the movement of the thrust producing motors would resemble the movement of canards on aircraft such as the Eurofighter and the recent version of the Sukhoi Su-35. The thrust producing motors would turn in the same direction. With the thrust producing motors horizontal, the aircraft or missile would be allowed to fly smoothly. When the thrust producing motors are rotated from the horizontal position, they would act to pull the airplane or missile into a spiraling motion.

For the aircraft to enter a spiraling motion, the thrust producing motors would need to revolve around the body of the aircraft so that the aircraft is pulled in changing directions. In the invention this is achieved by using the rotate-able tube that allows the thrust producing motors to revolve around the main body of the aircraft—using the rotate-able tube as a means of travelling around a part of the main body of the aircraft. One motor is rotated more than another motor to create an imbalance between the rotational forces exerted on the rotate-able tube by the motors. The rotation of the rotate-able tube would be automatic and continuous while the imbalance between the motors was maintained. Placing the motors back into a horizontal position would remove the imbalance, allowing the rotate-able tube to come to rest. Friction between the aircraft body and rotate-able tube or a braking mechanism such as a hydraulically activated brake pad being pushed against the rotate-able tube could help to stop the rotate-able tube from rotating.

Another way of causing the rotate-able tube to rotate is to have motors of different sizes or different power capabilities, or by unequal fuel deliveries to the motors, such that one motor receives fuel at a greater rate than another motor.

Although the aircraft could be in the form of a jet propelled airplane, it could be in the form of any one of a range of aircraft such as guided missiles and unguided missiles. It could also be in the form of non-powered aircraft such as gliders or winged bombs that are designed to glide to a target.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

Embodiments of the invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings, of which:

FIG. 1 shows the left side view of a multi-stage missile comprising a spiral inducing assembly.

FIG. 2 shows the left side view of an aircraft in the form of a jet airplane comprising a spiral inducing assembly.

FIG. 3 shows an enlarged view of the spiral inducing assembly of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 shows the left side of the spiral inducing assembly of FIG. 2 after the spiral inducing assembly has been activated to cause a spiraling motion to occur.

FIG. 5 shows the right side of the spiral inducing assembly of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 shows the spiral inducing assembly of FIG. 2 in an activated state, and after the rotate-able tube has been rotated.

FIG. 7 shows an aircraft according to this invention in the form of a missile using the spiral inducing mechanism of FIG. 2

FIG. 8 shows a cross-sectional view of the spiral inducing assembly of FIG. 2 as viewed from the front of the airplane.

FIG. 9 shows a cross-sectional view of the spiral inducing assembly as viewed from behind the spiral inducing assembly.

FIG. 10 shows the left side of the front of the fuselage of the airplane of FIG. 2.

FIG. 11 shows how fuel can be delivered to a rotating thrust producing motor.

FIG. 12 shows how the mechanism could be adapted to fit a multi-stage missile, for automatic spiraling activation on separation of the final stage.

FIG. 13 shows a detailed view of how fuel can be forced to flow from a fuel container over a prolonged period of time.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows one form of the aircraft 1 as a multi-stage missile 1, fitted with a spiral inducing assembly 2.

Referring to FIG. 1, a rotate-able tube 3 forming part of the spiral inducing assembly 2 can be seen encircling part of the main body 4 of the missile 1. The main body has a fore end and aft end. Referring to this tube 3 as the primary tube 3, the primary tube 3 is able to rotate around the part of the main body encircled by the primary tube. The primary tube is shown as being narrower in the front than at the rear. Also shown is another tube 5 that is fitted to the missile such that it encircles part of the main body 4 of the airplane. Referring to this tube 5 as the activation tube 5, the activation tube 5 is fitted so that it can be moved in a forward direction relative to the part of the main body 4 encircled by the activation tube and then back to its original position on the main body. FIG. 1 also shows the edge of one horizontal fin 6 a that is connected to the outside of the primary tube 3. The fin 6 a is connected to the outside of primary tube 3 such that it can rotate in a pivoting manner as shown in FIG. 4. A thrust producing means in the form of a ramjet 6 b is attached to the fin 6 a. Rotation of the fin causes the ramjet to rotate relative to the rotate-able tube.

FIG. 2 shows another form of the aircraft 1 as a jet propelled airplane 1, fitted with a spiral inducing assembly 2.

Referring to FIG. 2, a rotate-able tube 3 forming part of the spiral inducing assembly 2 can be seen encircling part of the fuselage 4 of the airplane 1. The fuselage has a fore end and aft end. Referring to this tube 3 as the primary tube 3, the primary tube 3 is able to rotate around the part of the fuselage encircled by the primary tube. The primary tube is shown as being narrower in the front than at the rear. Also shown is another tube 5 that is fitted to the airplane such that it encircles part of the fuselage 4 of the airplane. Referring to this tube 5 as the activation tube 5, the activation tube 5 is fitted so that it can be moved in a forward direction relative to the part of the fuselage 4 encircled by the activation tube and then back to its original position on the fuselage. FIG. 2 also shows the edge of one horizontal fin 6 a that is connected to the outside of the primary tube 3. The fin 6 a is connected to the outside of primary tube 3 such that it can rotate in a pivoting manner as shown in FIG. 4. A ramjet 6 b is attached to the fin 6 a. Rotation of the fin causes the ramjet to rotate relative to the rotate-able tube.

FIG. 3 shows an enlarged illustration of the left side of the spiral inducing assembly 2 of FIG. 2. The fin 6 a in FIG. 3 is connected to the outside of the primary tube 3 by a connecting joint which is in the form of a connecting rod 7. Extended from the connecting rod 7 in FIG. 3 is a protruding section 8 which is used to rotate the connecting rod 7. Rotation of the connecting rod 7 causes the fin 6 a and ramjet 6 b to rotate in a pivoting manner around the connecting rod 7 (in the manner shown in FIG. 4). Linked to the protruding section 8 in FIG. 3 is a stem 9. Referring to this stem 9 as an activation stem 9, the activation stem 9 is used as a means for pushing the protruding section 8 such that when the protruding section 8 is pushed, the protruding section 8 forces the connecting rod 7 to rotate around the longitudinal axis of the connecting rod 7. The activation stem 9 is linked to the protruding section 8 by a rivet 10. The activation stem 9 is shown as being fitted on the inside of the primary tube 3 and is supported inside the primary tube 3 by a retaining bracket 11. The retaining bracket 11 is rigidly joined to the inside of the primary tube but is channeled to allow the activation stem 9 to move longitudinally between the retaining bracket 11 and the primary tube 3. The activation stem 9 is allowed to protrude rearward from the primary tube so that it can be reached by the activation tube 5 when the activation tube 5 is moved forward on the fuselage 4. The activation tube 5 is forced to move forward by an activation mechanism 12 consisting of hydraulic actuators 13 and 14.

FIG. 4 shows that as the activation tube 5 is forced to move forward on the fuselage 4 when the hydraulic actuators 13 and 14 extend, it eventually makes contact with the activation stem 9. As the activation tube 5 is forced to move further forward, it pushes the activation stem 9 forward on primary tube. As the activation stem 9 is pushed forward, the activation stem pushes against the protruding section 8 and moves the protruding section 8, thereby rotating the fin 6 a and ramjet 6 b around the connecting rod 7 in a pivoting manner.

In FIG. 4 a rivet 10 is shown connecting the activation stem 9 to the protruding section 8, which allows movement between the activation stem 9 and the protruding section 8. The retaining bracket 11 keeps the activation stem from moving laterally around the primary tube. The retaining bracket 11 however does allow longitudinal sliding movement of the activation stem 9 so that it can be pushed and moved by the activation tube 5.

FIG. 5 shows the right side of the spiral inducing assembly 2 of FIG. 2. Shown is another fin 17 a, a ramjet 17 b and another connecting joint in the form of a connecting rod 18 that connects the fin 17 a to the outside of the primary tube 3. Another protruding section 19 is used to rotate the connecting rod 18, and the activation stem 20 is used to push the protruding section 19, with the activation stem 20 linked to the protruding section 19 by a rivet 21. Also visible in FIG. 5 is the activation tube 5. The connecting rod 18 allows the fin 17 a and ramjet 17 b to rotate in a pivoting manner. Another retaining bracket 22 is shown supporting the respective activation stem 20. FIG. 5 shows the hydraulic actuators 15 and 16 located on the right side of the spiral inducing assembly 2 which also form part of the activation mechanism 12 by which the activation tube 5 is forced to move. When the hydraulic actuators 13 14 15 and 16 are forced to extend as hydraulic pressure is applied to them, they force the activation tube 5 to move forward as shown in FIG. 3. The activation stem 20 in FIG. 4 is shorter than the activation stem 9 in FIG. 3.

Thus, it can be seen from FIGS. 2, 3, 4 and 5 that the activation tube 5, the activation stems 9 and 20, retaining brackets 11 and 22, protruding sections 8 and 19, rivets 10 and 21 used to connect the activation stems 9 and 20 to respective protruding sections 8 and 19, the connecting joints 7 and 18 in the form of connecting rods 7 and 18, and the activation mechanism 12 used to move the activation tube 5 consisting of the hydraulic actuators 13, 14, 15 and 16, collectively form a ramjet rotating mechanism, by which ramjet rotating mechanism the ramjets can be rotated in the same direction, so that the rotational force exerted on the primary tube by one ramjet can be overcome by the rotational force exerted on the primary tube by another ramjet.

While ramjets have been shown, other types of jet engines could also be used. Turbojets and turbofans could be used instead of ramjets. Solid fuel or liquid fuel rocket motors could also be used instead of ramjets. If rocket motors are used, they could be rigidly attached to the primary tube, positioned so that thrust could cause the primary tube to rotate and forced in lateral directions. The rocket motors could be of unequal sizes, and or use different fuels or have different rates of fuels delivery to achieve rotation of the primary tube.

FIG. 6 shows the spiral inducing assembly of FIG. 2 with the primary tube 3 in a state of rotation. It can be seen comparing FIG. 6 with FIG. 2 how the lateral forces on the airplane would be constantly changing, enabling the spiral inducing assembly 2, to force the airplane 1 to travel in a continuous spiraling motion.

FIG. 7 shows an aircraft according to this invention in the form of a missile 1 with a spiral inducing assembly 2 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 8 shows a cross-sectional view of the spiral inducing assembly of FIG. 2 as viewed from the front of the airplane. Shown here is the primary tube 3, the fins 6 a and 17 a, the ramjets 6 b and 17 b, the fuselage 4 of the airplane, the activation stems 9 and 20, linked by rivets to the protruding sections 8 and 19 respectively, the connecting rods 7 and 18 penetrating the primary tube 3, and with the protruding sections 8 and 19 screwed in the connecting rods 7 and 18 respectively. FIG. 8 shows a way of supporting the primary tube 3. Shown is a tube of smaller diameter 23 than the primary tube 3. This smaller tube 23 is a supporting tube in that it is used to support the primary tube 3. It has a smaller diameter than the primary tube 3 to provide a gap 24 between the primary tube 3 and the supporting tube 23. The gap 24 is used to allow freedom of movement to the protruding sections 8 and 19, and the activation stems 9 and 20 shown positioned inside the primary tube 3. Bolts 25, 26, 27 and 28 are used to join the primary tube 3 to the supporting tube 23. The supporting tube 23 is able to rotate around the encircled part of the fuselage 4.

FIG. 9 shows a cross-sectional view of the spiral inducing assembly as viewed from behind the spiral inducing assembly. Shown in FIG. 9 are the rear ends of the activation stems 9 and 20, and the retaining brackets 11 and 22 that support the activation stems 9 and 20, and prevent uncontrolled lateral movement of the activation stems 9 and 20.

FIG. 10 shows a side cutting of the part of the fuselage 4 encircled by the primary tube 3 of FIG. 2. The encircled part of the fuselage 4 can be seen to be narrower than the rest of the fuselage 4. Thrust bearings 29 and 30 are positioned on the narrowed section of fuselage 4. The thrust bearings are used to prevent the primary tube moving longitudinally relative to the fuselage 4.

FIG. 11 shows a locking mechanism 31 by which the ramjet 6 b could be restrained in a horizontal position during flight. The locking mechanism is connected to a rigid support 32 on rotate-able tube 3 by a telescopic tube 33. The telescopic tube 33 contains a spring 34 to force the locking mechanism 31 towards the fin 6 a. A stem 35 protruding from the locking mechanism is used to move the locking mechanism forward when the tube 5 is move forward, thereby allowing the ramjet 6 b to be rotated. FIG. 11 also shows a fuel line 36 for delivering fuel to the ramjet from a flexible fuel container 37 in a cylinder. A piston 38 is used to force fuel from the fuel container into the fuel line. The piston 38 is forced to move by a moveable tube 39. The tube 39 is forced to move by hydraulic actuator 40. Hence fuel can be supplied either with rotate-able tube 3 rotating and when it is not rotating. The fuel line 36, the fuel container 37 and the piston 38 are attached to the rotate-able tube 3. A protruding section 41 prevents the fin 6 a from being rotated beyond that protruding section. A spark plug 42 receives electrical charge from a battery 43, thereby providing an ignition source.

FIG. 12 shows how the spiraling mechanism can be made to work by separating sections of the multi-stage missile of FIG. 1. The secondary stage comprises the spiraling mechanism, which is connected to the primary stage 44. When the secondary stage ignites for separation from the primary stage, a nylon cord 45 is burnt off, releasing the moveable tube 5 and allowing the springs 46 and 47 to push the moveable tube 5 forward on the secondary stage of the missile. The rotate-able tube could be fitted with a fuel supply system as shown previously, with the movable tube 5 being used to force fuel to flow from a flexible fuel container 48. The fuel container could be made to carry fuel for a jet engine or a chemical that could react with a solid fuel to ignite solid fuel rocket motors.

FIG. 13 shows an enlarged view of the flexible fuel container 48 of FIG. 12 and how fuel can be forced to flow from the container 48 over a prolonged period. The container is located within cylinder 49. Fuel is forced to flow from the container when a piston 50 is pushed against the container. The piston 50 is able to move inside a cylinder 51. The cylinder 51 is forced to move towards the container when the moveable tube 5 of FIG. 11 is moved towards the container. A soft spring 52 positioned inside cylinder 51 is able to maintain a force against the piston 50 over a prolonged period of time, thereby allowing fuel to flow steadily over a period of time even if the cylinder 51 is pushed so far as to almost enter cylinder 49. Alternatively, a spring could be positioned inside cylinder 49, between the piston 50 and the container 48 or a plug if fuel was kept within cylinder 49 without a container.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US20120018572 *Apr 13, 2010Jan 26, 2012Israel Aerospace Industries Ltd.Air vehicle and method for operating an air vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/3.22, 244/62, 244/55, 244/3.21
International ClassificationF41G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB64C9/06, B64C5/04
European ClassificationB64C9/06, B64C5/04
Legal Events
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Apr 30, 2014FPAYFee payment
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