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Publication numberUS784601 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1905
Filing dateApr 11, 1903
Priority dateApr 11, 1903
Publication numberUS 784601 A, US 784601A, US-A-784601, US784601 A, US784601A
InventorsLloyd B Taylor
Original AssigneeLloyd B Taylor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gun-trunk.
US 784601 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED MAR. 14:, 1905.

L. B. TAYLOR.

- GUN TRUNK.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 11, 1903.

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Patented March 14, 1905.

PATENT OFFICE.

LLOYD B. TAYLQB, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

GUN-TRUNK.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 784,601, dated March 14, 1905.

Application filed April 11, I903. Serial No. 152,168.

To fbZZ whom, it may concern.-

Be it known that I, LLOYD B. TAYLOR, a citizen of the United States, residing at Ohicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Gun-Trunks, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to gun-trunks, or devices for carrying guns, and has for its object to provide convenient means for carrying a series of guns and for supporting them in such way that guns of various sizes and shapes may be conveniently handled.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a side elevation of a gun-trunk with parts in vertical section. Fig. 2 is a plan view'of a tray. Fig. 3 is a cross-section on the line 3 3 of Fig. 2.

Like parts are indicated by the same letter throughout the several figures.

A is the bottom, A the top, and A the sides, of a trunk or case which is to contain the gun-trays. It is made of any convenient material, size, and shape.

B is the bottom of the gun-tray, with which is preferably associated the rising ends B B, having the connecting cornerpieces B Arranged upon the tray are a series of blocks C C, each provided with a long slot 0 and with a felt or other like elastic surfacing material C Each block is secured upon, though adapted to move along, the traybottom by means of a bolt D, which projects up through the slot C andis provided with a thumb-nut D, whereby the block C is firmly secured in any desired position within reasonable limitations upon the tray-bottom. E is the gun-barrel, and F the gun-stock. Any number of these blocks may be used and they may be of varying sizes and shapes. They will have inclined faces, as may be desired.

My drawings are to be understood as diagrammatic and to be taken as illustrating a single form which the gun-trunk may assume under the general terms of my inven tion. 7

The use and operation of my invention are as follows: With a tray shaped as shown and provided with the movable blocks I can put a gun in position, its stock, for example, being forced somewhat firmly against the clastic edge C of a given block 0. This block is fixed in any desired position. The block on the other side of the stock is then adjusted by means of the slot C, so as to bring it to a position where the stock is somewhat firmly grasped between the two elastic edges of the associated block C. The thumb-nut D is then operated to secure the last block in position, and thus the stock of the gun is firmly held. In like manner the barrel of the gun may be secured in position. In like manner a series of guns, as indicated in Fig. 2, may be arranged on the same tray, the stocks and barrels differing in size and the blocks being adjusted to suit these differences. The trays are then dropped into the trunk in the ordinary manner, the lower one being properlyadjusted-as, for example, by the pieces G G-and the trays can be set in one on top of the other until the trunk is full. The blocks may be of greatly-differing sizes and shapes, and the slot may be in the bottom of the tray instead of in the block, if desired. By means of the devices illustrated the gun can be very securely grasped between the two blocks without injuring or defacing the parts which engage the gun members. It

will be observed that each block is or may be secured by a single bolt, and thus it is pivotally secured and will tend to take its propef position. It will also be observed that all the inner blocks are double-acting, for there is a slight difference between the shape of the block and the interval between the gun-stock and the barrel. The elastic edge of the block will accommodate for this inequality.

It will be apparent from the drawings that each block that is double-acting has one edge inclined with respect to the opposite edge. In order to accommodate the blocks to clamp the oblique edges of gun-stocks and at the same time gunbarrels, the blocks will evidently be arranged so that each block has one clamping edge substantially parallel with the adjacent edge of the block which is nearest to it and its other clamping edge reversely inclined to the adjacent edge of the more remotely placed block next to such edge. This arrangement would be possible with various shapes of block provided they have one bearing edge oblique to the other, for the reason that the blocks are rotatably mounted on the tray; By this arrangement it will be evident that without substituting new blocks of different obliquity provision for a considerable variation in the size and shape of the gun-stocks may be made, insomuch as each block is independently adjustable. lhe device is, in fact, a flexible and mutually-accommodating set of clamps, by means of which a variation in a single one of the articles held in place may be taken up and counterbalanced by an appropriate rcarrangement of the whole.

I claim 1. In a gun-trunk, the combination of a tray and a series of independent securing blocks arranged in line with each other, each block being adjustable both longitudinally and rotatably, and independent means for securing each block after it has been adjusted, substantially as set forth.

2. In a guntrunl the combination of a tray and a series of independent securingblocks, each block being adjustable both longitudinally and rotatably, and adjacent blocks having reverselyinclined bearing edges, and means for securing each block after it has been adjusted, substantially as set forth.-

3. In a gun-trunk, the combination of a tray and a series of tapering, longitudinallyslotted securing-blocks, each block being adjustable both longitudinally and rotatably, and they being reversely arranged in line with each other, substantially as set forth.

4. In a gun-trunk, the combination of a tray, a series of independent longitudinallyslotted securing-blocks arranged in pairs and formed each with one bearing edge oblique to the other so that when the adjacent edges of the blocks of a pair are arranged to be approximately parallel, the other edges of the blocks of the pair are reversely inclined each with relation to the adjacent edge of the next block of the series, the blocks being all adjustable both longitudinally and rotatably, and means for securing the blocks after they have been adjusted substantiallyas set forth.

5. In a gun-trunk, the combination of a tray, a series of independent securing-blocks arranged in line with each other, each block being adjustable both longitudinally and rotatably and provided with elastic bearing edges, and independent means for securing each block after it has been adjusted, substantially as set forth.

6. In a gun-trunk, the combination of a tray, a series of independent securing-blocks in the same plane, each block being adjustable both longitudinally and rotatably, and independent means for securing each block after it has been adjusted, substantially as set forth. I

7. In a gun-trunk, the combination of a plurality of independent securing-blocks adjustable longitudinally and rotatably, such blocks being arranged in two rows, the blocks of one row being set, alternately, relatively near together and relatively distant from each other, the blocks of the'other row being arranged. in like manner but spaced one from another in reverse order and such blocks being provided with oppositely-placed bearingfaccs one oblique with respect to the other, so that one row of blocks may be set to clamp in position alternately the barrels and stocks of guns, while the other row will in like manner clamp the other ends of such guns, but in the reverse order.

LLOYD B. TAYLOR.

lVitnesses HOMER L. KRAFT, EDWARD T. WRAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2420347 *Dec 19, 1944May 13, 1947Harrington & Richardson Arms CLine throwing gun kit
US2519662 *Jul 30, 1948Aug 22, 1950Alfred KempkenAluminum gun case
US2556329 *Feb 3, 1950Jun 12, 1951Foster HunterGun rack
US2572706 *Apr 16, 1949Oct 23, 1951Central Stamping And Mfg CompaBox lid support
US3018897 *Mar 22, 1960Jan 30, 1962Carlyle Walter LSki rack
US3077977 *Dec 9, 1960Feb 19, 1963Wood Charles RArtist's brush case and rack
US3154192 *Oct 15, 1962Oct 27, 1964Vermont American CorpPlastic case for drills and the like
US5299722 *Jan 21, 1993Apr 5, 1994Cheney Dale SDouble lid truck storage box
US5484092 *Apr 4, 1994Jan 16, 1996Cheney; Dale S.Vehicle storage box with double secured compartments
US5678686 *Feb 6, 1996Oct 21, 1997Plano Molding CompanyGun case
Classifications
International ClassificationF41C33/06
Cooperative ClassificationF41C33/06
European ClassificationF41C33/06