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Publication numberUS785438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 21, 1905
Filing dateSep 24, 1904
Priority dateSep 24, 1904
Publication numberUS 785438 A, US 785438A, US-A-785438, US785438 A, US785438A
InventorsCharles E Sargent
Original AssigneeCharles E Sargent
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure-gage.
US 785438 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED MAR. 21, 1905.

C. E. SARGENT. PRESSURE GAGE. APPLIOATION FILED sBPT.z4.19o4.

www w// //N Patented March121 1905.

PATENT OFFICE.

CHARLES E. SARGENT, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

PRESSURE-GAGE.

SPECIFICATION `formingpart of Letters Patent ilo. 785,438, dated March 21, 1905.

Application filed September 24, 1904. Serial No. 225,734.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, CHARLES E. SARGENT, a citizen of the United States of America, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Pressure-Gages, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in pressure-gages; and its object isto produce a device of this class which shall have certain advantages, which will appear more fully and at large in the course of this specification.

To this end my invention consists in certain novel features, which are described herein and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, which represents a vertical section through my improved device.

'minating just above the bottom of the chamber. An inlet-pipe A opens into the mercury-chamber at one side. Acap B is screwed over the top of the mercury-chamber, and the said cap, together with the said top of the mercurychamber,forms a compression-chamber. A tube C extends through the cap B into the compression-chamber and is held in place by packing c, held under compression by a thimble C. The tube C is provided at its top with a bulb D and along its side with a plurality of contact-points E. A plug F is provided to give access to the chamber, and a contact-point G, entering the liquid, is secured to the mercury-chamber.

In practice the mercury-chamber Ais filled with mercury approximately to the level of the bottom of the compression-chamber, and pressure is applied to the inlet-pipe A. As the pressureincreases it is transmitted by the mercury to the air in the compression-chamber, tube, and bulb, which of course is compressed, in accordance with Boyles law, affordinga space for the rise of the mercury in the compression chamber. The mercury reaches the lower end of the tube C just before the pressure which the gage is intended to indicateV is reached. As the pressure increases from this point the mercury rises very rapidly through the length of the tube and passesin succession the contact-points therein, any or all of which may be connected with electrical apparatus, as desired. Still further increase of pressure will cause the mercury to enter the comparatively large bulb at the top of the tube, and its further rise will become very slow indeed.

My im proved device is particularlydesigned for use and in connection with automatic sprinklers and the like, where-it is necessary that a continuous high pressureof water be maintained. The parts are arranged so that the normal pressure holds the mercury just within the bulb and keeps the electrical circuit closed. If for any reason the pressure is diminished, the mercury falls in the tube and opens the circuit, thereby starting the pumps, which raise the pressure until the circuit is closed.l

The tube C is made adjustable in the cornpression-chamber, so that the point at which the mercury reaches the tube can be varied to .accommodate the device to systemsof standard pressure.

In some cases it may be desirable to prevent the grounding of the electrical circuit through the water of the pressure system. To produce this result, it is desirable that the water be removed from contact with the mercury, and this is accomplished by means of a chamber H, interposed between the inlet-pipe A and the water-pipes of the system. This chamber, it will be seen, has a long tube t, which is practically a continuation of the inlet-pipe A', and a pipe L is provided at the lower fend. of the chamber H, which can be connected with one of the water-pipes of the pressure system. The pressure of the water will then be transmitted through the air in the chamber H to the mercury, and thewater itself will never come in! contact with lthe mercury. The chamber H is made of suflcient size that the water will never rise above the end of the tube t, and the upper end of the chamber H is constricted at the end H to prevent water from splashing over the end of the tube, and so reaching the mercury.

It will be evident that many variations in IOO the construction of my device are possible and that any desired liquid can be substituted for mercury, although I greatly prefer mercury on account of its superior advantages as an electrical conductor. My device is particularly advantageous because of the fact that the device is of small size, and the rapid movement of the indicating medium is obtained at and near the point when accurate indication is desirable and comparatively slow movement is obtained elsewhere.

I realize that considerable variation is possible in the details of this construction without departing `from the spirit of the invention, and I therefore do not intend to limit myself to the .specific form herein shown and described.

I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent- 1. In a device of the class described, the combination with a chamber for containing liquid and an inlet-pipe opening into the same, of a compression-chamber opening into the lower part of the said liquid-chamber, containing a tube extending upward from said compression-chamber, and a comparatively large bulb at the upper end of said tube.

2. In a device of the class described, the combination with 'a chamber for containing liquid and an inlet-pipe opening into the same, of a compression-chamber opening into the lower part of said liquid-containing chamber, a tube of small diameter extending from the top of said compression-chamber, and a comparatively large bulb at tlieupper end of said tube.

3. In a device of the class described, the combination with a liquid-containing chamber and an inlet-pipe opening into the same, of a compression-chamber above the liquid -eontaining chamber, a tube extending downward from the bottom of the compression-chamber to the lower part of the liquid-containing chamber, a tube ofismall diameter extending from the upper part of the compression-chamber, and a bulb at the end of said second tube.

4. In a device of the class described, the combination with a liquid-containing chamber and an inlet-pipe opening into the same, of a compression chamber above the liquidcontaining chamber, a tube extending downward from the bottom of the compression-chamber to the lower part of the liquid -containing chamber; a tube of small diameter extending from the upper part oi' the compression-chamber, a bulb at the end of said second tube, and means for adjusting said second tube within said com pression-chamber.

5. In a device of the class described, the combination with a mercury-chamber and inlet-pipe opening into the same, ot' a compression-chamber above the mercary-chamber, a tube extending downward from the compression-chamber to the lower part of the mercury-chamber, a tube extending upward from the upper part of the compression-chamber, a contact-point in the second tube, and a bulb at the upper end of the second tube.

6. In a device of the class described, the

combination with a mercury-chamber and inlet-pipe opening into the same` ot' a compression-chamber above the mercury-chamber, a tube extending downward from the compression-chamber to the lower part of the inerf' eury-chamber, a tube extending upward from the upper part ot' the compressionchamber, a plurality of contact-points in the second tube, and a bulb at the upper end ot' the second tube.'

7. In a device of the class described, the combination with a mercury-chamber, and an inlet-pipe opening into the same, oi' a compression-chamber above the mercury-chamber, a tube extending' downward from the compression-chamber to the lower part oi the mercury-chamber, a tube extending upward from the upper part of the mercuryichamber, a contact-point in the second tube, a bulb at the upper end of the second tube, an inletpipe opening into the mercury-chamber, an air-chamber opening into the said inletpipe and a tube communicating with the inlet-pipe, and extending to the top of the air-chamber.

In witness whereo' I have signed the above application for Letters Patent, at Chicago, in

the county of Cool; and State of Illinois, this.

21st day of September, A. I). 1904.

CHARLES E: SARGENI.

lVitnesses:

RUSSELL Wines, CHAS. SHEHVEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2909927 *Jan 23, 1956Oct 27, 1959Hughes Tool CoFluid pressure gauge
US3342063 *Feb 23, 1965Sep 19, 1967Technicon InstrBlood-viscosity measuring apparatus
US3425385 *Dec 4, 1964Feb 4, 1969Int Harvester CoAir restriction gauge
US3688585 *Sep 8, 1970Sep 5, 1972Uberto CapraFluid pressure gauge
US4259975 *Apr 9, 1979Apr 7, 1981Conoco, Inc.Stock tank gauger-level controller
US4782704 *Dec 16, 1986Nov 8, 1988G. S. PhillipsMercury manometer
US6520021 *Jul 20, 2000Feb 18, 2003Fisher & Paykel LimitedPressure measuring device
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG01L9/0091