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Publication numberUS786022 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1905
Filing dateJan 23, 1904
Priority dateJan 23, 1904
Publication numberUS 786022 A, US 786022A, US-A-786022, US786022 A, US786022A
InventorsPattie Williams Gee, Ida Carpender
Original AssigneePattie Williams Gee, Ida Carpender
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus.
US 786022 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' No. 786,022. A PATENTEDMAR.28.149O5. P. W. GEE & I. OARPENDER.

GAME APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED JAN.'23, 1904. I

UNITED STATES.

Patented March 28, 1905.

PATENT OFFICE.

PATTIE WILLIAMS GEE AND IDA CARPENDER, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

GAME APPARATUS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 786,022, dated March 28, 1905.

Application filed January 23, 1904a Serial No. 190,344.

To all whmn it nan/y concern;

Be it known that we, PATTIE WILLIAMS Gun and IDA CARPENDER, of the city, county, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Game Apparatus, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact specification.

This invention relates to apparatus for playing a card game; and the object is to provide means which will afford all the amusementconnected with playing a game and at the same time impart historical knowledge or information particularly relating to the rulers of nations, their dynasties, and their chronological succession.

In the accompanying drawings, which illustrate specimens of the groups of cards embodied in the game apparatus. Figure 1 is a face view of a card of the dynasty group. Fig. 2 is a face View of a card of the consort group. Fig. 3 is a face view of a card of the sovereign group. Fig. 4 is a face view of the single card of the commonwealth.

In the accompanying drawings only one card of each group is shown, as these are all that will be required to fully illustrate the in vention. The cards are employed to play a game called royalty; but other games of a kindred nature may be played therewith, and such cards may be of about the size and proportions of the ordinary playing-cards and of a similar material. vThe cards represent the governing dynasties of a nation, the reigning sovereigns of such dynasties, and the consorts of said sovereigns, and the number-cards of each group, as well as the whole number of cards, will depend on the particular country, empire, or kingdom chosen. In the present instance England is chosen, and there will be seven (7) cards in the dynasty group, thirty (30) cards in the sovereign group, (not including the cards of the seven dynasties,) thirtytwo (32) cards of the consort group, and one (1) card of the commonwealth group. This will make a total of seventy (70) in all. On the face of each card will be printed in silhouette a profile portrait of a sovereign or consort, with a number proper to the card and the name of the sovereign or consort depicted thereon. On the cards of the sovereign group will also be printed the letter 11; but this letter will not be printed on the cards of the consort group. The cards will be printed in seven colors, a different color for each dynasty, and all the sovereigns will face in one direction, preferably to the right, and their consorts in the opposite direction, or to the left. The silhouette portraits on the d ynastycards will be in a light color or white on a dark ground of the dynasty color, and the silhouette portraits on the other cards will be in the dark dynasty color on a light or white ground. The numbers on the dynasty and sovereign cards will be consecutive in the order of the respective reigns, and the numbers on the consort-cards will be those of their respective sovereigns. For example, Fig. 1 shows a card of the dynasty group, bearing a portrait of William the Conqueror as the first of his dynasty and the twenty-second sovereign, and Fig. 2 shows a card of the consort group bearing a portrait of Matilda of Flanders, consort of the former. This card has, therefore, the same number as that in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a card of the sovereign group, bearing the portrait of Queen Victoria, with the number '56. Fig. 4: is a card bearing the portrait of Cromwell and the letter P for Protector.

The game of royalty may be played with these cards as follows: The cards are shuffled and dealt one at a time to each player and to the board until five cards are dealt to each, those dealt to the board being faced and spread out to form the royal field. The play goes around from left of the dealer, and after each player plays four cards the dealer deals four more from the pack to each player, and this goes on until the pack is exhausted or until the game of fifty points is won by one side or one player, as the case may be. The player holds his cards concealed and plays to the royal field on the board in any one of three ways at his own discretion-namely, first, consorts; second, succession; third, discard. Gonsorts consists in pairing a card displayed in the royal field with one from his hand bearing the same number, the pair constituting a trick. This trick is placed face down at his side on the table. Succession consists of three or more cards with consecutive numbers of reign, as 22, 23, 24, &c. This trick is made by playing one card from the hand to two or more in the royal field, or if he holds two cards of a succession in his hand he may build by placing one of these next above or below that in the field on or partly over the card in the field and announce that he is founding a succession. This he leaves at his risk until his next play. Another player may, if he can, complete the succession and take the trick. Discard consists in taking any one of the cards from the royal field and replacing it by two cards from his own hand. In counting the points in the tricks gained each card marked R counts one, except the seven dynasty-cards, which count ten each. The card of the commonwealth, bearing the portrait of Cromwell, is an exceptional card and may or may not be used. WVhen used, the player whoholds and plays it may sweep in as a trick the entire royal field. "hen the royal field is exhausted from any cause, the next player must discard one card, and the player following him must take it up by way of discard unless he takes it as a consort-trick or utilizes it to found a succession. In either of these last two cases the next player following must discard unless he is able to complete the succession. Cards placed together for founding a succession cannot be separated.

The cards shown in the drawings are what are known as double-headech but this is not essential to the invention.

Having thus described our invention, we claim 1. A game apparatus consisting of cards divided into groups representing reigning sovereigns or rulers of a country and their consorts, said cards bearing respectively, the portraits, names, and consecutive numbers of the sorts, each of said cards bearing a portrait in profile and silhouette of a sovereign or consort, the name of said personage, and the consecutive chronological number of the reign of that sovereign, all of the cards of each dynasty group of rulers being printed in a color special to that group, and having the portraits of the rulers facingin a direction opposite to those of the consorts, substantially as set forth.

3. A game apparatus consisting of cards divided into groups representing reigning sovereigns or rulers of a country and their consorts, each of said cards bearing a portrait in profile and silhouette of a sovereign or consort, with the sovereigns facing to the right and the consorts to the left, the name of said personage, and the consecutive chronological number of the reign of that sovereign, all of the cards of each dynasty group of rulers being printed in a color special to that group, the portraits of the founders of dynasties being light on a dark ground, and those of other sovereigns and consorts being dark on a light ground substantially as set forth.

4. A game apparatus consisting of cards having a portrait on the face'of each card and divided into groups, one group having on the respective cards thereof the portraits of the sovereigns originating the dynasties, another group having on the respective cards thereof the portraits of the other sovereigns of the dynasties, another group having on the respective cards thereof the portraits of the consorts of the respective sovereigns and another group having on the respective cards thereof portraits of rulersnot belonging to the dynasties, all the cards of each dynasty group being printed in a color special to that group, and the cards bearing portraits of the sovereigns being numbered consecutively in the order of the reigns of the sovereigns.

In witness whereof we have hereunto signed our names, this 19th day of January, 1904, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

PATTIE WILLIAMS eEE. 1m OARPENDER.

Witnesses:

HENRY G. VosE, HENRY CoNNE'r'r.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5112059 *Apr 22, 1991May 12, 1992Mundle Craig MCard game
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02