Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS788886 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1905
Filing dateFeb 7, 1905
Priority dateFeb 7, 1905
Publication numberUS 788886 A, US 788886A, US-A-788886, US788886 A, US788886A
InventorsWilliam J Citron
Original AssigneeWilliam J Citron
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for illusory entertainment.
US 788886 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED MAY 2, 1905.

W. J. CITRON. DEVICE FOR ILLUSOPJY ENTERTAINMENT.

APPLIOATION FILED FEB. 7, 1905.

3 SHEETS-SHEET l.

mvN

wzzm es.

No. 788,886. TATENTEN MAY 8, 1905.

v J. OITRON. DEVICE FOR ILLUSORY ENTERTAINMENT.

APPLIOATION FILED FEB. 7, 1905.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

fnveninr; 8

Yin/In Hmocviwnrn w- BIMIVJIH WHNIIVU "mm A VIII cu m" m No. 788,886. PATENTED MAY 2, 1905. W. J. GITRON.

DEVICE FOR ILLUSORY ENTERTAINMENT.

APPLICATION FILED FEB.7,1905.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

' 713111655651 fizvezztaws F gm '7 STATES Patented May 2, 1905.

PATENT WVILLIAM J. CITRON, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 788,886, dated May 2, 1905.

Application filed February 7, 1905. Serial No. 244,630.

. by declare the following to be a full, clear,

and exact description of the same, reference being bad to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification.

This invention relates to a scheme and de vices for illusory entertainment by panoramic and other means and to certain improvements in such apparatus, as hereinafter described, and illustrated by drawings that form a part of this specification.

My improvements consist in a carriage for seating spectators, mounted on revolublc supports that give an impression of rolling vehicles or traveling motion at rapid speed; in moving panoramic scenes imprinted or painted on webs moving oppositely to the supposed course of the carriage, in combination with fixed painted scenery and bioseopepictures, with mechanical and other devices to produce the required movements and illusions that form the subject of my invention.

The object of my invention is to provide pleasant and instructive amusement to patrons, devoid of danger or fatigue.

Referring to the drawings, Figure I is a general plan view of apparatus to carry out my invention; Fig. II, a side elevation of the same; Fig. 111, an end view of the same apparatus from the rear; Fig. IV, a detail showing the means "for maintaining tension of the movable panoramic webs.

To better explain the nature and purpose of my invention, a principal scheme is to provide apparatus to illustrate a trip in a railway-carriage across the continent--for example, i'rom San Francisco to New York the panoramic scenes being in all cases adapted to the views and aspects of the country and supposed environment.

Referring to the drawings, these represent,

as arranged, a modification to provide illusory effect on land. 1 is the carriage or station for passengers, provided with the usual seats 2, its weight mainly suspended from the top by flexible ropes or chains 3, as shown in Figs. II and III. The carriage 1, which can be of any required length, is in part supported on truck-wheels 4;, that bear upon rollers 5, which latter can be of truly circular form to producea plain rumbling noise and sensation or may be of irregular contour around their periphery to produce a more obvious noise and vibration of the carriage 1. The rollers 5 are supported in brackets 7, set on foundations 8, as shown in Figs. I and II.

9 is the motive power, preferably an electric motor, or the first transmission-shaft can be connected by suitable gearing to any source of power.

12 and 13 are the moving panoramic webscreens disposed at an angle, as shown in Fi III, approximately normal to the line of view from the windows of the carriage 1 and conveying to the observers the impression of a flat receding country or plane. These screens are mounted on rollers 14 and 15, that may be set any distance apart as the length of the screens 12 and .13 may require-in practice onehundred feet or more, the present drawings being loreshortened to permit increase of the scale and render them plain. The moving panoramic screens 12 and 13 and the flat plane represented thereby by illusion blend their perspective into other scenes represented on the screens 24 and 25, that may be mounted on the inclosing walls 17 or are movable to produce more illusory effect. The screens 2 1 and 25 for slow movement or at the beginning of a supposed joining can be painted and then as motion is increased be changed to pervious screens with views projected thereon from the rear. I do not by means of bioscope-machines confine myself to a particular construction of these.

In the front of the carriage .l and the audience seated therein I provide a cross-screen 18, on which can be displayed kineographie or stereopticon views to harmonize with the panoramic and other scenery at the sides or horizon or to indicate approach. This latter (the I show screen 18) can be fixed or movable. it fixed in Fig. III.

Referring now to the operating parts, and

especially to Fig. I, the motive shaft 19 is provided with tooth-pinions 20, that connect to the shaft 19 by the clutches 22 and 23 and mesh, respectively, into the wheels 24 and 25 on the shafts 26 and 27, as shown in Fig. I. From the shaft 26, driven by the wheel 24, is a sprocket-chain that connects to the wheel 28 on the shaft 29, driving the same, and from this shaft 29 and sprocket-wheels 30 on the ends thereof other chain sprocket-wheels, 31, drive the shafts 32 and 33, on which latter are the rollers 14 and 15, that support and traverse the movable panoramic screens 12 and 13 at each side of the carriage 1.

To produce a sense of lateral oscillation in the carriage 1 without the discomfort of such motion to the company therein, 1 provide illusory means for this effect by a lateral vibratory motion of the panoramic webs 12 and 13, that conveys an impression of oscillation, while the carriage 1 remains fixed. This vibratory motion of the panoramic webs 12 and 13 is accomplished by means of a reciprocating longitudinal movement of the shafts 32 and 33 and the rollers 14 and 15 thereon by means of the cams 34 and 35 on a short shaft 36, a spur-wheel 37, that meshes into a corresponding wheel 38 on a long shaft 39, which transmits motion to the other end of the carriage 1, where there is another set of corresponding vibratory gearing, as shown in Fig. II. From the cams 34 and 35 swivel-jointed connectingrods 40 and 41 connect to shackle-bearings 42 43 on the ends of the roller-shafts 32 and 33, as shown in Figs. I and III. This vibratory gearing is in this case driven by a sprocketchain from the shaft 33 and by means of the bevel gear-wheels 44, the short shaft 47, and sprocket-wheel 45, from which a chain connects to the sprocket-wheel 48 on the shaft 39. Instead of transmitting the power to this vibratory gearing from the shaft 33 connection can be made from the first moving shaft 19 to the long transmitting-shaft and through the gear-wheels 37 and 38; but the result is the same except to lessen the strain on the shaft 33.

The axles 51 and supporting-wheels 4 of the carriage 1 are driven by means of the chain 50, leading from a sprocket-wheel 52 on the shaft 27 to a sprocket-wheel 53 on the first axle of the carriage, as indicated in Figs. I and II, and from this axle 51 a second chain 54 and sprocket-wheels connect the first axle to the next, and so on, for as many wheels and axles as may be required.

The panoramic screens 12 and 13 when painted and of some weight maintain sufficient tension because of weight in the bottom strand 55, which assumes a catenary accordingly; but for light material a movable tension-roller, as shown in Fig. IV, can be employed.

To maintain a straight face on the upper or visible face of the panoramic webs or screens 12 and 13 without over tension of the same, rollers 57 are provided at suitable intervals.

Having thus described the nature and objects of my invention and the manner of constructing and operating the same, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. In illusory exhibition apparatus, a stationary carriage with seats for spectators, said carriage mounted on driven wheels, at the sides of said carriage movable panoramicscenery webs disposed in planes inclined upward and outward from the carriage, vertical bioscopic scenes beyond said movable webs, and means for driving said scenery-Webs, substantially as specified.

2. In illusory exhibition apparatus, a stationary carriage for spectators, mounted on driven wheels, movable panoramic-scenery webs disposed in planes inclined upward and outward from the carriage, means for driving said scenery-webs, bioscopic scenes beyond said movable webs, and means for causing lateral vibratory motion of the panoramicscenery webs, substantially as specified.

3, In illusory exhibition apparatus, a stationary carriage for spectators, driven wheels under said carriage, movable panoramic-scenv ery webs at the sides, with means for driving said webs, means for producing lateral vibratory motion in said webs, fixed bioscopic scenes beyond the movable webs, and a screen for stereoptic display at the end of the carriage, substantially as specified.

4. In illusory exhibition apparatus, a stationary carriage for spectators, driven wheels under said carriage, movable panoramic-scenery webs at the sides, disposed in planes inclined upward and outward from the carriage, means for driving said scenery-webs, bioscopic scenes beyond said movable webs, and a fixed vertical screen at the end of the carriage at right angles to the bioscopic screens,

WILLIAM J. CITRON.

Witnesses:

ALFRED A. ENQUIST, ELMER WIOKES.

IIO

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5403238 *Aug 19, 1993Apr 4, 1995The Walt Disney CompanyAmusement park attraction
US5456184 *Aug 19, 1993Oct 10, 1995The Walt Disney CompanyLateral energy absorbing device for slot guided vehicle
US5473990 *Aug 19, 1993Dec 12, 1995The Walt Disney CompanyRide vehicle control system
US5583844 *Jun 19, 1993Dec 10, 1996The Walt Disney CompanyIn an electronic control system
US5623878 *Nov 16, 1995Apr 29, 1997The Walt Disney CompanyDynamic ride vehicle
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63G31/16