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Publication numberUS789290 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1905
Filing dateApr 27, 1904
Priority dateApr 27, 1904
Publication numberUS 789290 A, US 789290A, US-A-789290, US789290 A, US789290A
InventorsHenry H Norrington
Original AssigneeHenry H Norrington
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manifolding-book.
US 789290 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 789,290. l v PATENTED MAY-9, 1905. H. H. NORRINGTON.

MANIFOLDING BOOK.

APPLIOATION FILED APE.27,1904.

6221255125: I I I unnfnx ivo. 789,290.

a NTED STATES Patented May 9, 1905.

PATENT CFFICE.

lVIANlFOLDlNG-BOOK.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 789,290, dated May 9, 1905.

' Application filed April 27, 1904. Serial No. 205,068.

To n/ZZ 1071/0117, 'llt pta/y (l0/warn.-

Be it known that 1, HENRY H. NonRrNe'roN, a citizen of the United States, residing at West Bay City, county of Bay, State of Michigan, have invented a certain new and useful lmprovement in Manifolding-Books,of which the `following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying' drawings, which form a part of this specification.

My present invention has for its object a novel manifolding-book; and it consists of the construction hereinafter described and claimed, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in whichw Figure 1 is a View in plan, showing the cover open. Fig. 2 is a view in side elevation, showing the cover open. Fig. 3 is a View similar to Fig. 2, showing portions of the construction and a page in folded position ready to receive the inscription. Fig. 4t is a detail View, in side elevation, showing a modification of the device. Fig. 5 is an additional view showing another modification.

My invention is designed to provide a manifolding-book of superior efficiency and utility whereby plural copies may be made of any given entry, one on a permanent bound slip or section, the original memoranda, and one carbon copy thereof, beingseparable one from the other and from the bound carbon copy. The book consists of record-sheets-of any desired number, (indicated at (0,) each of said sheets being provided with weakened lines, (indicated at b 6,) dividing the sheet into plural record sections, (indicated by the numerals 1, 2, and 3.) For certain purposes the sheets might be divided only into two recordsections to provide one carbon impressionbesides the original, and for certain other purposes it will be desirable to divide it into three record-sections,so that two carbon im pressions may be made beside the original. The book may or may not be provided with a cover. A cover is shown in the drawings consisting of a lower cover portion c and an upper or folding' portion d. All of the sections 1 of each of the sheets are bound together at the lateral margins thereof, as at e', the said sections being bound together along aline parallel to the weakened lines. Intermediate the upper and lower edges of the record-sections 1 and 2 the sheets are slitted, as indicated at e, the slits being provided on the weakened line between the sections 1 and 2 and constituting' a part of said weakened line. Carbon-paper, as a carbon-sheet, is indicated at j', folded intermediate its edges, forming a pair of leaves, the folded portion being extended through the slits e, the folded edge being' secured in position in any suitable manner. In Figs. 2. 3, and 4 the folded edg'e is shown passed through the slits of all the record-sheets and secured upon the cover portion, as indicated at g. In books of considerable thickness it will be desirable to have several pairs of carbon-sheets so secured in place, two pairs being indicated in Fig. 3. It is also obvious that instead of a folded carbon-sheet constituting a pair of leaves having its folded edge extending' through the l slits of the record-sheets two separate carbon sheets might be provided having' their inner edges similarly located and arranged. l/V hen arranged, the two carbonsheets may be folded over the sections 1 2, as shown.

In operation the outer record-section 3 of each record-sheet is first folded over section 2 with the intervening' carbon-sheet, the two sections 2 and 3 then being` folded again over the permanent bound section 1 with the carbon-sheets, the one lying between sections l and 3 and the other between sections 2 and 3, as indicated in Fig'. 3 of the drawings. It will be obvious that when so folded section 2 will be uppermost and that the original memorandum is made upon section 2 and carbon impressions are made upon sections 1 and 3 of the record-sheets- To accomplish this result, one carbon-sheet has a carbon-face lying' down toward section 1, and the other carbon-sheet lying upon section 2 when folded has acarbon-face lying' against section Sections 2 and 3 are then unfolded and detached. One sheet of the carbon will then fall back over section 2 of the underlying record-sheet, and by raising or folding overthe recordsec tion 1, upon which an impression has just been made, the other carbon-sheet will fall back into place upon the next record-section 1 ofthe underlying record-sheet ready for additional memoranda. The sections 1 heilig' permanently bound at their lateral margins parallel with the weakened lines are thus held permanently in place. In this manner each of the sections l and 2 have their own carbons, while the slits mentioned afford more ready detachment of sections Q from sections l. The bound sections as so arranged lie in a natural and proper position. No shortened sections are necessary, and the record-sheets as so formed and arranged do not require any special cutting-dies for their formation, as would be required if the detached sections were shorter than the bound sections of the record-sheet. The turning back, as already observed, of a bound section lets the carbonsheet thereon fall into proper place without the necessity of handling the carbon-sheet, and the carbon-sheet also falls into proper place when the detached sections are removed without having to handle the carbon-sheet.

The manifolding-book enbodied in my invention is well adapted for shipping purposes, for sales-books, for telegraph and warehouse blanks, and for other uses.

I have described the bound sections as being secured at their edges on a line parallel to the weakened lines. I would have it understood, however, that I do not limit myself solely thereto, for, as shown in Fig. 5, the bound sections might be bound at their upper ends, the detachable sections being made shorter than the bound recordsections, the carbon copy, however, being engaged between the bound sections and the adjacent detachable sections.

So, also, I do not limit myself solely to engag ing the carbon-sheet between the bound sections and the adjacent detachable sections.

In Fig. 3 the carbon-sheet is shown fastened to the top of the bottom portion of the covervas by cement, for example;while in Fig. 5 the carbon-sheet is shown fastened to the under side of the block or cover portion, as by means of staples.

The carbon-sheets, it will be observed, are so located and arranged as to fold in opposite directions.

What I claim as my invention is- 1. In a manifolding-book a record-sheet divided into sections, said sheets slitted between said sections, and carbon-sheets secured in the slits between said sections to fold inA opposite directions.

2. A manifolding-book formed of a plurality of record-sheets each sheet divided into sections by weakened lines, said sheets being' marginally bound together at the edges of corresponding sections on a line parallel to the weakened lines, each sheet formed with a slit between the bound sections and the adjacent sections, and carbon-sheets located in said slits.

3. A manifolding-book comprising a plnrality of record-sheets, said sheets being divided into sections by intervening weakened lines, said sheets being bound together at the edges of corresponding sections along a line parallel to the weakened lines, and formed with slits between the bound sections and the ad jacent sections, and carbon-sheets secured in the slits to fold in opposite directions.

4;. A manifolding-book of the nature described formed of'a plurality of-record-sheets divided into sections by weakened lines, said sheets being bound together at the edges of corresponding lateral sections on a line parallel to the weakened lines, the remaining sections of each sheet arranged to fold over the bound section, each sheet formed with a'slit between the bound section and the adjacent section, and carbon-Sheets secured in the slits to fold in opposite directions.

5. A manifolding-book of the nature described having a plurality of record-sheets divided into sections by weakened lines, said sheets being marginally bound together at the edges of corresponding lateral sections, the remaining sections of each sheetarranged to fold over the bound section and made separable therefrom along' the corresponding weakened lines, each sheet formed with a slit between the bound section and the adjacent section, and carbonesheets located in the slits to fold in opposite directions.

6. A manifolding-book formed of a plurality of record-sheets, each sheet divided into sections by weakened lines,said sheets marginally bound together at the adjacent edges of corresponding lateral sections, and carbonsheets secured in place between two adjacent sections to fold in opposite directions.

7. A manifolding-book of the nature described having a plurality of record-sheets, each sheet divided into sections by weakened' lines, said sheets at the edges of corresponding lateral sections being marginally bound together, the remaining sections of each sheet arranged to fold over the bound section, each sheet formed with a slit between the bound section and the adjacent section, and carbonsheets secured in the slits to fold in opposite directions, the intermediate section of each record-sheet, when the sheet is in folded position, lying on the outside.

8. A manifoldingbook comprising a plurality of record-sheets each having record-sections separated from one another byY a weakened line and each sheet having an intervening slit between the sections, corresponding record-sections of said sheets being marginally bound together along a line parallel to said weakened lines and constituting a permanent record, and carbon-paper engaged in the slits between the bound sections and the adjacent sections.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

HENRY H. NORRINGTON. lVitnesses:

HARRY J.'M1LLEP., DANIEL M. SHAvER.

IOO

IIS

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4723861 *Mar 16, 1987Feb 9, 1988Merchant Larry ABookbinding apparatus and method
US6179335 *Aug 17, 1999Jan 30, 2001Minigraphics, Inc.Product label bearing an instructional booklet
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB41L1/24