Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS791802 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1905
Filing dateMay 16, 1904
Priority dateMay 16, 1904
Publication numberUS 791802 A, US 791802A, US-A-791802, US791802 A, US791802A
InventorsJustin De Lisle
Original AssigneeJustin De Lisle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hypodermic syringe.
US 791802 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

\ PATENTEDJUNE 6, 1905-.

J. DE LISLE. HYPODBRMIG SYRINGE.

APPLIOATION FILED MAY 16,1904.

UNITED STATES Patented June 6, 1905.

JUSTIN DE LISLE, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

HYPQDERMIC SYRINGE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 791,802, dated J une 6, 1905.

' Application led May-16,1904. Serial No. 208,141'.

To all whom, t may concern.-

Be it known that I, J Us'IIN 'DE LIsLE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city of New York, borough of Manhattan, in the county and State of New York, have invented a new and Improved Hypodermic Syringe, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

The object of the invention is to provide a new and improved hypodermic syringe, more especially designed for making hypodermic injections of antitoxic serum and arranged to maintain its parts during the time the syringe is stored or in transit in an absolutely aseptic condition, to prevent contamination of the serum, and to insure a free unobstructed flow of the serum through the needle when the syringe is used.

The invention consists of novel features and parts and combinations of the same. as will be more fully described hereinafter, and then pointed out in the claims.y A vpractical embodiment of the invention is represented in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure l is a sectional side elevation of the improvement, showing the parts assembled and the serum sealed against deleterious or contaminating influences. Fig. 2 is a sectional side elevation of the improvement, showing the parts in position for making-a hypodermic injection; and Fig. 3 is yan enlarged sectional side elevation of the needle, its supporting stopper, its closing wire, and the block.

The container A for the 'serum or like charge B is in the form of a barrel open at both ends, one of the ends being, however, contracted to form a neck A', onto which fits `eXteriorly a stopper C, of rubber 0r other suitable material, and through this stopper C extends a needle D, projecting at its inner end into the serum B, and through the bore of the said needle passes a wire E for keeping the bore closed to `the serum duringl the time the syringe is stored or in transit. The wireE projects beyond both ends of the needle D to prevent the serum fromA passing into the inner end of the needle, and on the outer end of the said wire E is held a block F, of cork or similar suitable material, adapted to be pushed onto the point of the needle D, so as to firmly inclose the said point to keep the latter free of contaminating influences, and at the same time preventingleakage through the needle. v

rIhe needle D is provided with external barbs D', engaging the material of the stopper O, so as to firmly support and hold the needle in position in the said stopper C, and the needle is also provided with a shoulder or flange D2, resting on the top face of the stopper to hold the needle firmly in position in the stopper,I especially when the needle-point is forced into the skin.

The stopper C is provided in its bottom with a seat C, intov which ts the exterior surface of the neck A, provided with an annular. projection or bead A2, so as to securely vhold the stopper against ordinary removal The from the neck A of the container A. stopper C is also provided within the seat O' with a projection C2, fitting into the neck A', as plainly shown in Figs. 1 and 2, to prevent possible leakage of the serum by way of the stopper C.

A cap G, closed at one end, is litted with its other or open end onto the stopper C, so that the cap G incloses the outer end of the needle end of the container Av for the cap to serve as a piston-rod to push the piston H, contained in the outer open end of the container, in an inward direction whenever it is desired to use the syringe for making a hypodermic injection, as indicated in Fig. 2.

In assembling the parts to prepare the syringe for the market it is necessary to proceed' as follows: The piston H is pushed into the container a desired distance to leave room between the top of the piston and the bottom of the neck A for the desired dose of serum to be used as a charge. p A piece of cotton is IOO taken to a sterilized or aseptic chamber orl room, and then the cotton is removed from the neck A', and the serum is then filled into the container, after which the stopper C is immediately connected with the neck Aso that the several parts are assembled ready for shipment and use.

By the arrangement described the serum B is perfectly sealed and protected against any contaminating deleterious influences, and at the same time the point of the needle is protected, and the bore of the needle is not liable to be clogged up by the serum, as the wire E fills the said bore. When the wire is withdrawn, it clears the bore of the needle of any matter that may adhere to the walls of the bore.

When the several parts are assembled as described, the syringe can be readily stored or shipped, and when it is desired to use the syringe to make a hypodermic injection then it is only necessaryfor the operator to remove the cap G from the stopper C, then to pull on thel block F, so as to disengage the block from the point of the needle, and to draw out the wire E from the bore of the needle to render the bore unobstructed and clear the same of any matter that may possibly adhere to the walls of the bore, and then the operator uses the cap G as a piston-rod for pushing the piston H after the point of the needle is inserted under the skin in the usual manner. When the piston H is pushed by the cap G, the serum B is forced through the needle D under the skin of the patient. After the syringe has been used for the purpose described it can be thrown away, as its cost is comparatively small.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the needle and the serum are fully protected against contaminating and deleterious influences, and the operator in order to use the syringe for making a hypodermic injection has but a few simple acts to perform, which acts do not require the operator to touch or handle the needle or break any part of the syringe, as is now required with the syringesl barrel and for forcing the serum out of it, a needle held by the stopper, and a cap seated on the stopper, inclosing the outer portion of the needle and forming a means for pushing the piston in the barrel for the discharge of the serum from the barrel through the said needle.

2. A hypodermic syringe comprising a barrel for containing serum, open at one end and having its other end contracted to form a neck, a stopper fitted exteriorly on the said neck, a piston in the barrel for confining the serum in the barrel between the piston and the stopper, a needle carried by the stopper and extending at its inner end into the serum and projecting at its outer end beyond the stopper, and a cap closed at one end and having its other open end fitted exteriorly onto the said stopper.

3. A hypodermic sy ringe comprising a barrel for containing serum, open at one end and having its other end contracted to form a neck, a stopper fitted exteriorly on the said neck, a piston in the barrel for confining the serum in the barrel between the piston and the stopper, a needle carried by the stopper and extending at its inner end into the serum and projecting at its outer end beyond the stopper, and a cap closed at one end and having its other open end fitted exteriorly upon thc said stopper, the cap when removed from the stopper forming a means for pushing the said piston in the barrel, to force the serum through the needle. y

4. Ahypodermic syringe provided with a serum-container having a neck, a stopper on the said neck, carrying the needle, and a cap fitting on the said stopper and having a contracted portion forming a stop.

5. A hypodermic syringe provided with a serum-container having a neck, a stopper held on the said neck, and a hollow needle extending through and supported by the stopper, the portion of the needle in the stopper having external barbs engaging the stopper material and the needle having means to prevent lengthwise displacement of the needle in the stopper on forcing the needle into the skin.

6. A hypodermic syringe provided with a container for serum and having a neck, a stopper provided with a seat fitting the exterior surface of the said neck, the said stopper having a projection within the said seat and fitting into the said neck, and a hollow needle extending through the said stopper and its projection, the needle having means to prevent lengthwise displacement of the needle in the stopper on forcing the needle into the skin.

7. A hypodermic syringe comprising a barrel for containing serum, open at one end and having its other open end contracted to form a neck, a piston in the barrel, a stopper fitted exteriorly on the said neck, a hollow needle extending through and supported by the said stopper, a wire passing through the bore of TOO the needle and projecting beyond the ends to thisspeeifieation in the presence of two subthereof, a block on the outer portion of the seriloing Witnesses. Wire, adapted to engage the point of the needle, and a cap closed at one end and'having JUSTIN DE LISLE 5 its open end seated on the said stopper, to n- Witnesses:

close the outer end of the needle and the block. n THEO. G. HOSTER,

In testimony whereof I have signed my name EVERARD BOLTON MARSHALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2539510 *Jun 3, 1949Jan 30, 1951Bristol Lab IncHypodermic syringe
US2551339 *Mar 18, 1949May 1, 1951Abbott LabAdministration of medicament
US2653603 *Aug 3, 1950Sep 29, 1953Jr George N HeinInjection apparatus
US2695613 *Feb 16, 1953Nov 30, 1954Macgregor Instr CompanyCarpule and needle attaching mount therefor
US2894509 *Jan 18, 1952Jul 14, 1959Becton Dickinson CoHypodermic syringe
US2896622 *May 17, 1955Jul 28, 1959Gruenenthal ChemieInjection ampoules for several media and intended to be used once
US3405713 *Oct 24, 1966Oct 15, 1968Ida SoloweyCombination hypodermic needle blocker and needle sheath
US4232669 *Feb 15, 1979Nov 11, 1980Bristol Myers Co.Protective sheath for syringe needle
US5836919 *Mar 10, 1997Nov 17, 1998Solopak Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Cap assembly
US7115114May 2, 2003Oct 3, 2006Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMedical device having releasable retainer
US7217258May 2, 2003May 15, 2007Becton, Dickinson And CompanyControlled release structure for attaching medical devices
US7717881Jan 4, 2007May 18, 2010Becton, Dickinson And CompanyControlled release structure for attaching medical devices
US8012132Feb 24, 2009Sep 6, 2011Becton, Dickinson And CompanyLuer-snap connection and luer-snap syringe
US8591475Jan 4, 2007Nov 26, 2013Becton, Dickinson And CompanyControlled release structure for attaching medical devices
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/28