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Publication numberUS794045 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1905
Filing dateOct 17, 1904
Priority dateOct 17, 1904
Publication numberUS 794045 A, US 794045A, US-A-794045, US794045 A, US794045A
InventorsWilliam J Pope, Julius Huebner
Original AssigneeWilliam J Pope, Julius Huebner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fabric and method of ornamenting same.
US 794045 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 SHEETS-SHEET l.

HG.&.

PATENTED JULY 4, 1905. W. J. POPE & J. HI'TBNER. FABRIC AND METHOD OF ORNAMENTING SAME.

APPLICATION FILED 001111004.

WE m EssEis.

% Mm Q QZWMAL'M/ No. 794.045. PATENTED JULY 4-. 1905.

' W. J. POPE & J. HUBNER.

FABRIC AND MET 0F ORNAMENTING SAME.

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rlnirr Starts Patented Jul-y t, 190th rent titrricni t-MHWIIB AND WIETHUD 0F OHNAitflENTlNti-E @JNMWEEE SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent lilo. 794.9%, dated July 4;, 1905. Application filed October 17, 1904- Serial No. 228,815.

To (all rel 1,0121, 1Z2; 'nmy concern/.-

Be it known that we, lVILLTAM: JACKSON Porn and JULIUS .l'ljtinisnn, British subjects, and residents of ltlanchester, county of Lancaster, l lngland have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Fabrics and lvfethods of ()rmunenting the Same, of which the following is a specification.

The method hitherto practiced for obtaining an engraved finish on textiles consists in impressing 0n the fabric under certain wellknown comjlitions the pattern from a metal cyliiider or bowl, upon the surface of which some hundreds of lines (usually straight and parallel) to the linear inch have been engraved. The impression produced upon the fabric under suitable conditions by this cylinder, hereinafter called the engraved bowl. gives the fabric a peculiar finish or luster hereinafter called the engraved finish.

F or the purpose of imparting an engraved finish of a uniform character to textiles the engraved bowls hitherto used have always been engraved with straight parallel lines. As one result of the parallel arrangement of these lines the full luster of the engraved finish only to be seen when the source of illinnination occupies a certain kind of position with respect to the fabric and to the eye of the observer. The finish is therefore only to a very limited extent uniform in character. because the surface of the finished material docs not present the same appearance in whichever direction it is viewed. J\l'l()tl1@1' kind of engraved finish which has been previously applied to textiles is obtained by the application of an engraved bowl, upon the surface of which a pattern made up of fine lines to the number of some hundreds to the linear inch has been engraved, which lines are not all straight and pa 'allel; but some, if not all, are curved, or, if straight, are not all parallel. This kind of engraved finish has hitherto been applied exclusively for the production of a finish which is visible to the eye as a perfectly definite design or pattern and has not been applied for the productioi'i of a finish which is uniform in character or which gives to the eye of the casual observer the impression of being a finish of a uniform character \Ve have discovered that an entirely new effect and a much more effective engraved finish, than has hitherto been obtained may be produced by the application of an engraved bowl, upon the surface of which is engraved a pattern consisting of lines lying very close together, as in the ordimlry engraved bowls, but which. pattern consists in the repetition over the surface of the bowl of an engraved design made up of closed curves or figures, the design which repeated being so small as not to be distinguishable as a defii'iite and distinct design by the eye of the casual observer who examines the fabric upon which the pattern has been impressed with: out the aid of a magnifying apparatus. In other words, the lines of the curves or figures are ll'llcl'OsQODlG, and the same statement applies to the intervening spaces between said lines.

Such a finish as that now described differs from the finish obtained by impressing with a bowl engraved with the ordinary parallel straight-line engraving in that it does not reflect light only when the source of illumination, the surface of the fabric or lamellar material. upon which the finish is impressed, and the eye of the observer occupy one defi nite series of relative positions; but it reflects light uniformly and shows a uniform finish or appearance in whatever relative ')osition it may be placed.

The engraved finish now described differs from all that have previously been obtained in that it is truly a uniform or homogeneous finish. the surface upon which the finish impressed exhibiting the same a1i)pearance in whichever direction it is observed with the eye, unaided by magnifying amiaratus.

The invention will be fully desta'ibed with referel'ice to the accompanying drawings, in which as examples several diagrams of the patterns or figures to be engraved upon the bowls or rollers are illustratial, all of which are drawn to a very greatly enlarged or magnified scale.

Figure 1 is an engraving of a number of small circles; Fig. 2, an engraving of sets of concentric circles; Fig. 3, an engraving of sets of concentric circles in modified form; Fig. ff, an engraving of sets of spirals resembling sets of concentric circles; Fig. 5, an engraving of sets of ovals or ellipses; Fig. (3, an engraving of sets of hexagons; Fig. 7, an engraving of sets of triangles; Fig. 8, an engraving of sets of triangles.

The uniform or homogeneous engraved finish which we have described above obtained by the countless repetition upon the surface of the engraved bowl of a design which is too small or too minute to be dis tinguishable by the eye unaided by ma'gnify ing apparatus or of a design with uniform repetition which is of a size quite readily ap preciable by the unaided eye, but which produce a somewhat similar optical effect, owing to the fact that the eye does not immediately analyze such patterns when so lIIIPIGSSQCl upon a lamellar surface, especially when such a. surface is folded or is made up into articles of dress or the like. The simplest form of engraving, which gives this new technical effect in the finishing of fabrics hereinbefore described, is illustrated in Fig. 1. This pattern or engraved finish is obtained by covering the surface of the engraved bowl with a pattern consisting in the repetition of minute circles having a diameter of one one-hundred and fiftieth part of a linear inch, the centers of adjacent circles being one onehundredth of a linear inch apart.

Instead of a repetition of single circles each circle may be made up of two, three, or more concentric circles with a minute dis tance between each. A design or pattern thus formed which gives a very good effect is illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. These patterns comprise sets of concentric circles engraved so close together that the surface of the engraved bowl is wholly filled in with lines lying very close together. The pattern is obtained by describing sets of equal circles packed closely together, but each approaching the adjacent circle within a distance of one one-hundredth of a linear inch. From the centers of these circles other sets of concentric circles are described with radii which increase in arithmetic progression from the one three-hundredth of a linear inch by a constant increment of one threehundredth of a lincar inch until the radius of the largest original circles is attained. The interstices between the larger original circles are filled in with sets of concentric arcs of circles drawn from the centers of the original circles, (see Fig. 2,) or they may be filled in with sets of circles and arcs drawn from the centers of the interstices, the increment of radius and the diameters of the smallest circles being the same as before. (See Fig.

We at present prefer to place the circles one three-lmndredth of an inch apart; but in practice the lines may be engraved at any distance apart from one one-hundredth to one five-hundredth of an inch. The pleasing character of the luster is materially enhanced by the fact that this particular kind of patterns give rise to an optical delusion, from which the observer derives the visual impression that the pattern changes as the material upon which it is impressed is moved.

The sets of circles described in Figs. 2 and 3 may be replaced by other kinds of figures, such as helices or spirals, Fig. 4, sets of ovals or ellipses, Fig. 5, sets of hexagons, Fig. 6, and sets of triangles, with either straight or curved sides, Figs. 7 and 8. Further, the figures used in the design may be filled in with engraving consisting of straight or curved lines, which lie in different directions in the various parts of the design. It is, however, to be understood that in place of circles we may use other curves or figures and that interstices in the pattern may be filled up by engraving consisting of lines in so far as the use of these lines does not interfere with the homogeneity of the finish, as the finish is apparent to the eye unaided by the aid of magnifying apparatus.

Although the main object of the present invention consists in obtaining an engraved finish which exhibits a uniform luster which is quite different in kind from any hitherto obtained, the invention may also be applied for the purpose of bringing into relief floral and other patterns which may be engraved upon the bowl or impressed or woven into the lamellar material. Thus pleasing effects may be obtained by the use of designs of different sizes in the different parts of a floral or other pattern. Although the size of the design in the engraved finish may be so small as to be indistinguishable as a definite design by the unaided eye, several different types or sizes of design of the above-described kinds may be so applied to the various parts of one pattern as to give different kinds of luster, and so to cause the floral or other pattern to stand out in greater relief. The invention may also be applied to fabrics or other lamellar materials on which a moire, crepe, goffered, or other impressed or calendered finish has been or is to be produced. It is further stated and is to be understood that the size of the pattern as also the degree of fineness of the engraving may be altered to suit the requirements of any particular case.

e wish it to be clearly understood that engraved bowls engraved with finely-engraved straight parallel lines, curved lines, and dots have been previously employed, and

"mate Sta we do not claim tor the use of these, because they ClO not re the e'tlect now described as new, this etlect being due to the use of an en tirely new type of design or pattern.

W hat we claim as our ii'ivention, and desire to Jrotecti by Letters Patent, is

1. A. method. of ornamenting textile fabric. which consists in in'ipressing thereimon a plurality o't' closely-armnged inclosed ligurcs the lines of which and the spaces between said lines are microscopic.

A method of ornamenting textile fabric, which consists in impressing thereo1'1 a plurality o'l curvilinear, grouped. :tigures, the groups being elosel arranged and the lines and the spaces between said, lines being microseopic.

3. it method of ornamenting fabric which consists in impressing thereupon. closed ligures arranged in groups. each oi the latter comprising several figures Sttt't()tt!1(lltlg one another and the lines of the figures and the spaces between said lines'being microscopic.

t. its an article of manutacture a textile t'a'tbric having one of its ftiaccs provided with a pluralitv ot concentric curvilinear microscopic lines closely arranged thereon to term a changeable lustrous surface and the spaces betwccn said lincs being also microscopic.

5. its an article of manntacture. a textile tlabric haring a. tare provided with. a plural it ot closed. jtigures concentric and arranged within one another to form a changeable lustrons surtacc the lines of the figures and the spaces between said lines being microscopic.

(3. its an. article of manuitacturc, textile 'labric having onits surface a plurality oit impressed grouped figures, the groups being closely arranged and the lines of the figures and the spaces liietwcen said lines being :mi l'UtHCUl llU.

T. method of orminienting fabric, which consists in embossing thcreup m a plmrality o't grouped figures, the lines of the ligures being microscopic and the spaces between said having thereupon embossed grouped tigures,

the lines of the figures and the spaces be tween the lines being microscopic.

11. As an article ot lnamrt'acture, itabrie haw-mg thereupon closely-arranged groups of embossed closed figures. the lines of and the spaces between which are microscopic.

12. its an article o't. manufacture, Fabric having thereimon closel '-a.rranged groups of embossed closed jligurcs, the lines ot and the spaces betwccn which arc microscopic and currilimmr.

ln witness whereoli we have hereunto signed our names in the presence ct two sub scribing witnesses.

iv. J. Ptllli. ill l5. I-llllilltllllt.

llli tncsses lt. ()wonn (YEMEN, ll. NA'LHAN iVoomman.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2560392 *Jun 5, 1945Jul 10, 1951Latrobe Pierre Michel LouisVariably illumined plate
US3463118 *Apr 10, 1967Aug 26, 1969Wood Remsen VDiffraction grating instrument dials
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Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB44F1/14