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Publication numberUS795719 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1905
Filing dateDec 14, 1903
Priority dateDec 14, 1903
Publication numberUS 795719 A, US 795719A, US-A-795719, US795719 A, US795719A
InventorsFrederick J Motz
Original AssigneeFrederick J Motz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Art of making perforated paper.
US 795719 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATBNTBD JULY 25,1905.

No. 795,719. F. J. MoTz.

ART Lor" MAKING PBRFORATBD PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED DBC. 14. 1903.

277i El.

FREDERICK J. MO'IZ, OF NEIV YORK, N. Y.

ART OF MAKING PERFORATED PAPER.

`Speeieation of Letters Patent.

Patented uiy 25, 12905.

Application filed December 14, 1903- Scrial NO 185,075.

Tn Il 10111111@ if mw 1/ ruimer/1,:

Be it known that I, Fununnick J. Mo'rz, a citizen of thel United States, and a resident of the city of New York, borough of .\Ianhattan, in the county and State of New York, have invented ncwand useful Improvements in the y Art of and Machine for Making Perforated Paper. of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

r1`his invention relates to a new method of making perforated paper. lt is particularly intended to produce. the perforated sheets used in musical instruments; but it is useful in other connections. IIeretofore these perforations have been made by cutting or punching them in the paper, which involves a loss of paper, an extra expenditure of time and labor, and also materially weakens the sheets.

)Iy invention comprehends forming openings in the paper stock while the same is vet in pulp-like form, and subserpientl y t-he stock thus oriliced is converted into paper, producing die perforated sheet referred to. In connect'on with this improvement it will be observed that the perforations are formed during the very formation of the paper and without any additional expenditure ot' time or labor. and there is an actual saving rather than a waste of stock, and further and quite as important is the fact that by this process the tibcrs ot' thc pulp adapt themselves to a large extent to the form of the perforations and assume positions lengthwise of the edges of the pcrforations., thus greatly increasing the strength of the perforated paper as compared with that of the paper which is cut or stamped to produce the perform-ions.

The invention also relates to a machine for' carrying out my improvement in the art. This machine mayl be of various of the known types of paper-making |nacliines-for instance, the Fourdriniermachineoracylinder-machine. I prefer, however, to adopt a Fourdrinier machine. and in doing this the wire is provided with a number of protuberances around which the plastic paper-pulp 1s spread, so that when -i the pulp is couched the pcrforations are retained and made permanent as the paper-making operation is completed. In order to facili- E tate the removal of the pulp from the wire, the

protuberances are made elastic, and at a certain point along tbe path of the wire these protuberances are cxpandc land then allowed to E retract, thus` separating their walls from the E pulp and allowing the pulp to be easily removed from the wire.

IY will now give as an example of my invention a speeilic description of one embodiment of the machine and one manner of practicingT the art. i

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification. in which similareliaracters of reference indicate correspt'nuling parts in both views.

Figurei is a plan view showing a Fourdri- I nier wise equipped for carrying out my process and illust-rating the pulp spread thereon; and Fig. 2 is a vertical section of the same, this view also illustrating the compressingrolls, the function of which will hereinafter appear.

)I y improvement may be practiced with the aid of paper-making apparatus of various sorts. In the drawings I haveshown part of a Fourdrinier machine modified accordingr to my invention. 'lo do this, the Fourdrinicr wire a has a number of protuberanccs earried on its upper or active face and arranged according to the order or pattern which it is desired that the perforated paper shall take.

- These protuberances will vary in shape according to the shape of the orifices to he produced, and they are preferably formed of soft rubber suitably fastened to the wire. The paper stock or pulp is spread over the wire, as indicated at e in Fig. 1, the pulp lying around the protubcrances and said protubevances forming in the pulp-orlices corresponding in size and arrangement to the protuberances. The pulp is then carried by the wire on through the other operations of the Fourdrinier machine, and the pulp is thereby converted into paper in which the orifices formed by tile i)rotuberances` are faithfully retained. It will also be observed that as the pulp is advanced on the wire the agitation of the pulp, due to the characteristic movement of the wire, causes the fibers of the pulp to settle around the protulmrances and to assume positions lengthwise of the side walls of the protuberances, and consequently of the orifices formed thereby, thusi greatly increasing the strength of the perforated paper as compared with that of the paper which is cut or stamped to produce the perforations'. ln order to enable the pulp t0 be readily removed from the wire and disoriv gaged from the protuberances thereof, I i construct the protuberanccs of soft rubber, as explained, or some other yielding material, and at a point on the frame of the Fourdrinier machine intermediate the last suctionbox and the couch-roll l vlocate two rollers e and ff'. '.lhesc rollers are suitably mounted on the l `ourdriuier frame, so that the wire a, with the pulp, passes between the rollers, i and by proper adjustment of the rollers the elastic protuberanecs will be compressed, thus increasing their thickness, and thereby widening out the perforatious in the stock formed by the protuberances. This upon the retraction of the protuberances detaehes the stock from the side walls of the protuberances and prevents the pulp from adhering tothe protuberanccs when the pulp is taken from the wire. Fig. l shows at the point c' the pulp in thc position it assumes when iirst placed on the screen, andthe shaded portion c' shows the condition of the pulp after having passed between the rollers whereat the protuberances are spread out, so as to enlarge the perforations and separate their walls from .the sides of the protuberances.

llavingthus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent- 1. The improvement in the art of produc ing perforated paper, which consists in the following successive acts, to wit., first, in disposing plastic paper pulp or stock around a p1 otuberance in a sheet the thickness of which is not more than equal to that of the protuberance to forni an opening through the pulp, and, second, in separating the pulp from the protuberance and converting the pulp into paper withoutclosing the opening formed by said protuberance.

2. rlhe improvement in the artV of producing perforated paper, which consists in the following successive acts, to Wit, first, in disposing plastic paper stock or pulp around a protuberance to form an opening in the pulp, second, in enlarging said protubcrance and permitting it to retract, to detach its sides from the adjacent pulp, and, third, in separatingthe pulp from the protuberance and converting the pulp into paper without closing the opening formed by said protuberance.

3. r[he improvement in the art of producing perforated paper, which consists in the following successive acts, to wit, lirst, in disposing plastic paper stoel: or pulp around a protuberance in a sheet the thickness of which is not more than equalto that of the protuberance to form an opening through the pulp, second, in agitating the pulp to cause the fibers to range lengthwise alongside of the protuberanc'e, and,-tl1ird, in separating the pulp from the protubcrance and converting the pulp into paper without closing the op'ening formed by the protuberanee.

scribing witnesses.

for the purpose specified.

' 6. A machine for making perforated paper having' a movable pulp-carrying part, with an elastic protuberance on the surface thereof for the purpose specified, and means for eX- panding said prot-uberance at a certain point along the path of movement of said papercarrying part.

7. A machine for making perforated paper havinga pulp-carrying part, with an expansible protuberance on the surface thereof for the purpose specified.

8. A machine for making perforated paper having a puip-carrying part, with an expansible protuberance on the surface thereof for the purpose specified, and means for periodically expanding said protuberance.

9. Aniaehine for making paper having a Fourdrinier wire, with series of protuberances on the pulp-engaging surface thereof, said protuberances being broken or spaced from each other longitudinally and transversely of the wire for the purpose specified.

10. A machine for making perforated paper having a Fourdrinier wire,'with an expansible protuberance on the pay rr-carrying surface thereof for the purpose. spccilied.

1 1. A machine for making perforated paper having a Fourdrinier wire, with an expansible protuberance on the paper-carrying surface thereof for the purpose specified and means for periodically expanding said protuberance.

12. A machine for making perforated paper having a Fourdrinier wire, with an elastic protuberance on the pulp-engaging surface thereof, and a pair of rollers through which said wire runs, the rollers serving to expand the elastic protubcrance when engaged therewith. Y

1n testimony whereof l have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two sub- FREDERICK J. MOT?.

'itncsses:

ISAAC B. OWENS, J No. M. Rn'rua.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3034180 *Sep 4, 1959May 15, 1962Kimberly Clark CoManufacture of cellulosic products
US3081500 *Jul 27, 1956Mar 19, 1963Johnson & JohnsonMethod and apparatus for producing apertured nonwoven fabric
US3081512 *Jul 27, 1956Mar 19, 1963Johnson & JohnsonMethod of producing apertured nonwoven fabric
US3081514 *Apr 26, 1955Mar 19, 1963Johnson & JohnsonForaminous nonwoven fabric
US3081515 *Apr 26, 1955Mar 19, 1963Johnson & JohnsonForaminous nonwoven fabric
US3110609 *Apr 30, 1959Nov 12, 1963Kimberly Clark CoCellulosic product
US3137893 *Dec 6, 1954Jun 23, 1964Kendall & CoApparatus and process for making apertured non-woven fabrics
US3150416 *Jul 29, 1960Sep 29, 1964Kendall & CoMethod and apparatus for producing apertured non-woven fabrics
US5527428 *Jun 26, 1995Jun 18, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess of making cellulosic fibrous structures having discrete regions with radially oriented fibers therein
US6039839 *Feb 3, 1998Mar 21, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making paper structures having a decorative pattern
US6136146 *Aug 22, 1997Oct 24, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper web comprising at least two regions of different density disposed in a first nonrandom, repeating pattern, and atleast two regions of different basis weight disposed in second nonrandom, repeating pattern different from first
US6464831Mar 17, 2000Oct 15, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making paper structures having a decorative pattern
WO2011092715A2 *Jan 24, 2011Aug 4, 2011Tata Memorial CentreMethod for in-vivo binding of chromatin fragments
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB31F1/07