Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS797614 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1905
Filing dateMay 13, 1903
Priority dateMay 13, 1903
Publication numberUS 797614 A, US 797614A, US-A-797614, US797614 A, US797614A
InventorsJulius Schipkowsky
Original AssigneeJulius Schipkowsky
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hat and coat rack.
US 797614 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED AUG. 22, 1905. J. SGHIPKOWSKY.

HAT AND GOAT RACK.

APPLIGATION FILED MAY 13, 1903.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

No. 797,614. PATENTED AUG. 22, 1905.

- J. SOHIPKOWSKY.

HAT AND COAT RACK.

APPLIOATION FILED MAY 13, 1903.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 8.

I W v Stratum ANDREW. B GRAHAM co, Puaro-ummmmsns, wAsluldomu, 0 c.

JULIUS SOHIPKOVVSKY, OF SOUTH MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN.

HAT AND COAT RACK.

No. 797,614c.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Aug. 22, 1905.

Application filed May 13, 1903. Serial No. 156,966.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JULIUS SGHIPKOWSKY, a citizen of the United States, residing atSouth Milwaukee, in the county of Milwaukee and State of Wisconsin, have invented a new and useful Hat and Coat Rack, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to improvements in hat and coat racks.

The object of the present invention is to improve the construction of hat and coat racks and to provide a simple, inexpensive, and efiicient one designed to receive a number of coats and hats and adapted to support the same independently of each other, so that there will be no liability of knocking down a hat or hats when removing a coat.

A further object of the invention is to provide a hat and coat rack adapted to support a mirror and capable of enabling a number of hats and coats to be placed on it without obstructing the view of or hiding the mirror.

The invention also has for its object to provide a hat and coat rack which may be compactly folded for shipping and storing.

Also it is an object of the invention to enable a plurality of hooks to be adjustably supported and to prevent the hooks from becoming accidentally separated from the supporting means and at the same time to permit a ready removal of the hooks when desired.

With these and other objects in view the invention consists in the construction and novel combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and pointed out in the claims hereto appended, it being understood that various changes in the form, proportion, size, and minor details of construction within the scope of the claims may be resorted to without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective View of a hat and coat rack constructed in accordance with this invention. Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the same. Fig. 3 is a perspective view, the hat and coat rack being folded. Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view of the same. Fig. 5 is a detail perspective view of one of the upper end brackets. Fig. 6 is a similar view of one of the lower end brackets. Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a hat and coat rack, illustrating a modification of the invention, the mirror being omitted. Fig. 8 is a perspective view of'one of the end brackets of the hat and coat rack shown in Fig. 7 Figs. 9 and 10 are detail views of hook-supporting bars. Figs. 11 and 12 are similar views of hooks for engaging the same. Fig. 13 is a sectional view illustrating another modification of the invention.

Like numerals of reference designate corresponding parts in all the figures of the drawings.

1 designates a pair of upper brackets, preferably consisting of castings and extending horizontally from a wall or other support, as illustrated in Fig. 1 of the drawings, when the device is in use. The inner ends of the upper brackets 1 are provided with upwardlyextending perforated ears 2 for the reception of screws or other suitable fastening devices for securing the upper portion of the hat and coat rack to thesaid support. The upper brackets, which may be ornamented in any desired manner, are provided at their outer portions 3, which are upwardly offset from the inner portion 4:, with horizontal sockets 5, consisting of recesses formed in the inner faces of the upper bracket and receiving the ends of a hat-shelf 6. The upwardly-oflset outer portions of the upper brackets are adapted to elevate the hats above the coathooks, hereinafter described, and is especially advantageous in the arrangement illustrated in Figs 7 and 8. The hat-shelf 6, which has curved ornamental edges and which is adapted to receive a row of hats, is preferably disposed horizontally, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, but it may be inclined. The outer portions of the upper brackets are also provided with projecting upper portions 3, curved outward and upward and forming guards to prevent hats from being accidentally pushed off the ends of the shelf. These oppositely-projecting portions or guards may, however, be of any other desired construction, as will be readily understood.

The inner portions of the upper brackets are provided with inwardly-projecting conical pivots 7, which [it in corresponding conical recesses 8 of lower brackets 9, which are arranged in an upright position, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, when the hat and coat rack is in use. Instead of employing conical pivots flat-ended pivots may be used, or the pivots may be provided with a round ball tip. The

upper brackets are arranged on the exterior of the lower brackets, and the pivotal connection between the brackets permits the upper brackets and the hat-shelf to fold downward against the lower brackets, as illustrated in Fig. 3 of the drawings, to arrange the parts compactly for shipping or storing. The inner ends of the upper brackets are provided with straight edges located in the same plane as the rear faces of the ears 2 and adapted to fit against a wall or other support. The pivots of the upper brackets are retained in the bearing-recesses of the lower brackets by screws 10 or other suitable fastening devices for securing the outer portions of the upper brackets to the ends of the hat-shelf.

The lower brackets are provided with upper longitudinal recesses 11 and lower sockets 12. and they have depending perforated ears 13, which are secured to the wall or other supporting-surface by screws or other suitable fastening devices in the same manner as the ears of the upper brackets. The longitudinal recesses 11 receive the ends of a mirror 14L, preferably of oblong shape, as shown in Fig. 1, and secured to the lower brackets by screws 15 or other suitable fastening devices, which pierce the lower brackets at the longitudinal recesses. The lower brackets are also provided at the outer walls of the longitudinal recesses with flanges 16, projecting over the outer faces of the ends of the frame of the mirror and effectually preventing the latter from becoming accidentally disengaged from the recesses of the lower brackets when the hat and coat rack is in use. The lower brackets are also provided with projections 16, arranged at the upper ends of the longitudinal recesses and extending over the upper edge of the mirror and adapted to increase the size of the upper ends of the lower brackets to facilitate the formation of the bearingrecesses for the pivots 7. By constructing the lower brackets in this manner they are adapted to be readily applied to the mirror, and when the parts are assembled they present an effective appearance.

The lower sockets 12, which are arranged beneath the longitudinal recesses 11, have curved front top and bottom walls, as shown, to conform to the configuration of a hook-supporting bar 17, which preferably consists of a strip of molding. The molding has a front face 19 forming substantially a compound curve from top to bottom, the top of the molding being rounded or convexly curved and the lower portion of the front face being concavely curved to conform to the configuration of double hooks 20. The double hooks,

11 00k is curved outwardly and upwardly for supporting a coat or other garment, and the upper end or bill of the hook is curved downwardly and forwardly and is adapted to embrace the rounded top portion of the molding. The hook-supporting bar or molding 17 is provided at its rear face with a longitudinal groove 21 to receive the forwardly-projecting portion of the bill or upper end of the hook, the distance between the upper end or bill of the hook and the adjacent portion of the shank being less than the thickness of the molding above the groove, whereby the upper hook, which embraces and conforms to the configuration of the upper portion of the molding, is retained thereon and is prevented from becoming accidentally disengaged therefrom. The lower portion of the back of the molding below the groove 21 has a flat face, and the upper portion of the back above the groove is arranged in advance of the fiat rear face 19, as clearly illustrated in Figs. 2 and 4 of the drawings, to provide a space for the upper bills or engaging portions of the hooks. By this construction the hooks are securely interlocked with the supporting-bar, which is provided with one ormore recesses 22, which intersect the groove to permit the hooks to be removed. The lower portions of the hooks are adapted to receive coats, and the upper portions or shanks are coiled, as shown, to provide the bar-engaging portion. The upper engaging portion 23 may be curved, as shown in Fig. 11, or an angularly-bent engaging portion 24L may be employed, as illustrated in Fig. 12. hen the angularly-bent portion 24 is employed, the hook-supporting bar will be provided with a flat face 25 and a straight groove 26, arranged at right angles to the face 25, as shown in Fig. 10. The hooks, which may be of any desired number, are adapted to receive and support coats out of the way of the mirror, so that the latter will not be hidden from view. are arranged away from the hat-shelf, so that there is no liability of accidentally knocking; down a hat or hats when removing acoat from 1 the lower portion of the device which constitutes a coat-rack.

In Fig. 7 of the drawings is illustrated a modification of the invention in which the;

mirror is omitted, end brackets 27 being employed. The end brackets 27 are constructed substantially the same as the upper brackets heretofore described, with the exception that In Fig. 13 of the drawings is illustrated another form of the invention in which only the hook supporting bar, the hooks, and brackets for supporting the bar are employed. The hook-supporting bar 32 is constructed Also the hooks as before described, and the brackets 33 are provided with sockets and have upwardly and downwardly extending ears 34 for" the reception of screws and other suitable fastening devices for securing the brackets to the wall or other support. The hooks 35 are constructed as before described and may be of any desired number.

Having thus fully described myinvention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-- 1. A device of the class describedcomprising end brackets provided with horizontal recesses and having sockets, a hat-shelf fittedin the recesses and secured to the brackets, a supporting-bar secured in the said sockets, and hooks carried by the supporting-bar, substantially as described.

2. In combination with the coat-rack, the brackets hingedly mounted at the top thereof at each side of the same and adapted to fold down upon the coat-rack, said brackets being held in their normal position by being secured to a wall or other support, and a hatshelf connecting the brackets and arranged horizontally when the brackets are in their normal position, substantially as described.

3. In a device of the class described, the combination of a hook-supporting bar consisting of a piece of molding having its front face concavely curved at the lower portion, and convexly curved at the upper portion to form substantially a compound curve, the back or rear face of the molding being provided with a longitudinal groove and having a flat face below the same, and the upper portion of the back of the molding being located in advance of the said flat face and having a recess intersecting the groove, and a double hook consisting of an approximately S-shaped shank fitted against and conforming to the configuration of the front face of the molding and having its lower end extended forwardly and upwardly to receive a garment, the upper end of the shank being formed into a hook and embracing the upper portion of the molding, the bill of the hook being extended into the groove of the molding, and the space between the bill and the adjacent portion of the shank being less than the thickness of the molding'above the groove, whereby the double hook is retained thereon, the said recess permitting the removal of the double hook, substantially as described.

4. A hat and coat rack comprising upper horizontal brackets, lower vertical brackets pivoted to the upper brackets, whereby the brackets are adapted to fold together, a hatshelf connecting the upper brackets, and a hook-supporting bar connecting the lower brackets, the said lower brackets being also adapted to receive a mirror, substantially as described.

5. A hat and coat rack comprising lower upright brackets, ahook-supporting bar con necting the lower brackets at the bottom thereof, a mirror mounted between the lower brackets and located above the hook-supporting bar, upper brackets, and a shelf support ed by the upper brackets, substantially as, described.

6. A hat and coat rack comprising end brackets, a hat-shelf supported by the brackets and arranged at the top of the same, a lower hook-supporting bar, and a mirror located between the brackets and arranged above the hook-supporting bar, said bar and mirror being supported by the brackets, substantially as described.

7 A hat and coat rack comprising upper and lower brackets, one set of brackets being provided with pivots and the other with recesses receiving the pivots, a shelf connecting the upper brackets and retaining the brackets in engagement with each other, a mirror located between the lower brackets, and a hooksupporting bar carried by the latter, substantially as described.

8. A hat and coat rack comprising a mirror, a hat-shelf located above the mirror, a hooksupporting bar located below the mirror, and brackets located at the ends of the rack and connected with and supporting the shelf, the mirror and the bar, substantially as described.

9. A hat and coat rack comprising lower brackets provided with recesses and having flanges at the outer sides thereof, said lower brackets being also provided below the recesses with sockets, a mirror fitted in the recesses and engaged by the flanges, and a hooksupporting bar secured in the sockets of the brackets and located below the mirror, substantially as described.

10. A hat and coat rack, comprising a mirror, a hook-supporting bar located beneath the mirror, a hat-shelf located above the mirror, brackets located at the ends of the rack and connected with and supporting the mirror the bar and the shelf, and hooks slidable on the bar, substantially as described.

11. A hat and coat rack comprising folding brackets having projecting portions and designed to be secured to a wall, a hat-shelf mounted on the projecting portions and offset from the wall, and a hook-supporting bar located beneath and in rear of the shelf, substantially as described.

12. A hat and coat rack comprising brackets hinged together and provided with means for attaching them to a support, a hat-shelf carried by one set of brackets, and a hooksupporting bar mounted on the other set of brackets, substantially as described.

13. In a device of the class described, the combination of opposite brackets provided with sockets and having vertical recesses located above the sockets, a bar fitted in the sockets and provided with a plurality of hooks,

and a mirror located above the bar and arranged in the said recesses, substantially as described.

14:. In a device of the class described, the combination of brackets provided with upper and lower sockets, the upper sockets beingoutwardly offset from the plane of the lower sockets, a hat-shelf fitted in the upper sockets, and a bar fitted in the lower sockets and provided with a plurality of hooks, substantially as described.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own I have hereto afliXed my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

JULIUS SGHIPKOVVSKY.

Vitnesses:

A. P. \VILDE, CHARLES FRANKIE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2665011 *Sep 24, 1949Jan 5, 1954Simjian Luther GTie rack
US3214032 *Dec 4, 1963Oct 26, 1965Paul Hightower JosephFoldable clothes hanger
US4854456 *Aug 10, 1988Aug 8, 1989Lee Juang JRack structure for balls and related equipment
US4978093 *Apr 18, 1988Dec 18, 1990Kennedy Samuel SPurse hanger
US5871105 *Mar 5, 1996Feb 16, 1999Suncast CorporationStorage apparatus for sporting goods
US5915307 *Jan 29, 1998Jun 29, 1999Suncast CorporationSports shelf
US8408404 *Feb 23, 2011Apr 2, 2013Patrick D. MillerShelving system and collapsible work bench
US20110204014 *Feb 23, 2011Aug 25, 2011Miller Patrick DShelving system and collapsible work bench
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47F5/103, A47G25/06