Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS802329 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1905
Filing dateJan 26, 1905
Priority dateJan 26, 1905
Publication numberUS 802329 A, US 802329A, US-A-802329, US802329 A, US802329A
InventorsEdward D Schmitt
Original AssigneeHallack A Penrose
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flying target.
US 802329 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 802,329. PATENTED OGT.1'7, 1905. E. D. SGHMITT. FLYING TARGET.

APPLICATION FILED JAN. 26, 1905.

2 SHEETSSHEET l.

mnmzw. a mum: to, momu'rmamvnus minute a L.

No. 802,329. PATENTED 0OT.1'7, 1905. B. D. SGHMITT.

FLYING TARGET.

APPLICATION FILED JAN. 26. 1905.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

WWW 20 y pine er s 'rn r prion.

EDWARD D. SGHMITT, OF NETV YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR TO HALLAGK A. PENROSE, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

FLYlNG TARGET.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 1'7, 1905.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, EDWARD D. SCHMITT, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented new and useful Improvements in Flying Targets, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to improvements in targets adapted to be thrown into the air or given flight by mechanical means to test the marksmanship.

The sport of live-bird shooting is exceedingly costly and in many places prohibited by law as being inhumane, and while the shooting of clay pigeons is interesting it lacks in a great degree the fascination of the sport first mentioned.

The object of this invention is to provide a target in close resemblance to a live bird both in flight and in action in falling when hit. It contemplates the provision of a body having wings adapted to balance the target in flight and which by suitable connections with the body proper will be collapsed or dropped when the target is hit, in combination with means which act in conjunction with the wing to guide the target in flight, all the details of which will be described in the following specilication.

lln the drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of the target in the position it assumes in flight. Fig. 2 is a top plan view of same; Fig. 3, a transverse section taken about on line X X of Fig. 2 looking toward the head of the target. Fig. 4L is a perspective view of the body proper removed from the frame. Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the head detached. Fig. 6 is a similar view of the tail, and Fig. 7 is a detail perspective view of a part of the means for attaching the head or tail to the frame.

Referring to the drawings, the numeral 1 indicates the frame, preferably formed of narrow thin metallic strips 2 and 3, the strip 3 being bent into the elliptical shape shown and oppositely disposed to the strip 2. The strip 2 is about half the length of the strip 3, and they are both soldered or otherwise lirmly secured together where they cross, as indicated by the numeral 4:, thus bringing the part2 in horizontal plane and the strip 3 in vertical position when the target is in flight. The numeral 5 designates a central band formed of the same material as strips 2 and 3. This is soldered or otherwise secured to the strip 3 at a and to the strip 2 at 7), or this band may be integral with the part 3, if desired. By thus forming the frame it is adapted to receive and hold the body proper, 6, formed of thin metal, hollow, and is of such size as to have play in the frame. This body is slotted at the sides, as at 7, to receive the inner ends of two wings 8. The wings are preferably formed of thin metal and of such weight and character as to be susceptible of being bent into position to guide the target. They are so formed and attached to said target as to insure its flight upward at the proper angle or to guide it in a straigl'itaway course and to balance or aid in balancing the target in flight. The inner ends of these wings pass through slots 9 in the band 5 and are pivoted or hinged thcreto, as indicated by the numeral 10, and extend through the slots 7 in the body, are bent downwardly and then substantially parallel with the outer portions of the wings, forming short horizontal arms 11, which are brought opposite each other. A. small space separates the ends of these arms, which space is bridged by the lower ends of the short'pin 12, rigidly secured to the inside of the body 6. This pin has an approximately semicircular recess 13 in its lower end, which embraces the ends of the arms 11 when the target is set preparatory to throwing. it will be seen that as the recess 13 in the end of the pin is transverse to the direction of the target in flight the wings will be held in position with sufficient force when the target is thrown to insure the necessary and desired flight; but should the body be twisted or moved in the frame the pin will disengage the arms 11 and permit the wings to drop or collapse, thus destroying the balance and disabling the bird, causing it to fall to the ground.

The band 5 is slightly dropped, as at c, and bears lightly upon the body to prevent it from moving vertically in the frame, although obviously permitting movement in every other direction under proper conditions.

The numerals 1a and 15 designate two segmental pieces secured rigidly to opposite ends of the frame and recessed, indicated by the numeral 16, to receive the tenon l? on the head 18 and a similar tenon 17' on the tail 19. This construction permits the head and tail, which assist in guiding the target in flight, to be set at any desired angle with relation to the body, so that the course of the target in flight can be varied to suit the requirements of the sport.

To set the wings, I provide an aperture 20 in the under side of the body in convenient position for the insertion of the finger.

In Fig. 2 I have shown in dotted lines a means with the use of which the outer parts of the wings may be moved independently of the arms 11. In this construction I provide recesses in the outer parts of the wings for the reception of short studs 21 on the outer ends of the arms 11.

In operation, assuming the bird to be in flight with the wings outstretched, the shot hits the body 6, which is exposed at all points save where covered by the narrow strips of the frame, and moves it from normal position to one side or the other, or forward with considerable force and suddenness, causing the pin carried thereby to disengage the arms 11, letting the wings drop. which will obviously destroy the equilibrium or balance of the target and cause it to fall.

Any suitable means for throwing the target may be adoptedas, for instance, it may be provided with guides adapted to embrace a rod-carrying spring-actuated means to throw the target, giving the same a straight initial movement. I do not, however, limit myself to any particular means for throwing the target and merely mention this as one of the many ways that would suggest itself to the mechanic as a result of the requirements of the case.

l. A target of the character described comprising a suitable frame, wings foldably connected to the frame, and means actuated by the shot to drop or fold the wings.

2. A target of the character described comprising a suitable frame, wings foldably connected to the frame, means actuated by the shot to drop or fold the wings, and means acting in conjunction with the wings to assist in guiding the target in flight.

3. A target of the character described com-' prising a suitable frame, a body movable in said frame, wings foldably connected to the frame and engaging the body, means carried by the body for keeping the wings in position for flight when the body is in normal position but adapted to permit them to drop when said body is moved from normal position.

4. A target comprising a suitable frame, a body movable in said frame, wings foldably connected with the frame and engaging the .body whereby they are kept in position for flight when said body is in normal position, but are dropped or folded when the body is moved, and means in conjunction with the wings for assisting and guiding the target.

5. A target comprising a suitable frame, a

slotted body movable in said frame, wings pivoted to said frame and having arms extending through the slots in said body, a pin carried by said body adapted to engage the ends of the arms and hold them in set position for flight butto disengage said arms to permit the wings to fall when said body is moved from normal position, and means for assisting in guiding the target, substantially as described.

6. A target comprising a suitable frame, wings pivoted thereto, means carried by said frame adapted to hold the wings in position for flight when in normal position, but to release the wings and permit them to drop when in abnormal position, and means in conjunction with, said wings for aiding in guiding the target in flight.

7. A target comprising a suitable frame, a slotted body movable in said frame, wings pivoted to the frame and having arms extending through the slots in said body, a pin carried by said body adapted to engage the ends of the arms when the target is set for flight but to disengage said arms to permit the wings to fall when said body is moved from normal position, members secured to the ends of the frame and having curved recesses therein, and guiding means carrying tenons adapted to enter said recesses in said. members, substantially as described.

8. A target comprising a suitable frame, wings pivoted thereto, means carried by said frame adapted to hold wings in position for flight when in normal position, and a head and a tail which in conjunction with said wings constitute the means for balancing and guiding the target in flight, substantially as described.

9. A target comprising a suitable frame, wings pivoted thereto, means carried by said frame, adapted to hold the wings in position for flight when in normal position, or to re lease the wings and permit them to drop when in abnormal position, and means in conjunction with the wings to guide and balance said target, and means for adjusting said guiding and balancing means, whereby the flight of the target may be predetermined.

10. A target of the character described comprising a suitable frame, guiding means adapted to be folded or collapsed when the target is hit, and means actuated by the shot to fold or collapse the guiding means to destroy the balance of the target and cause the same to fall.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two subscribing witnesses.

EDWARD D. SCHMITT.

Witnesses:

CHAS. T. LUTHER, S. H. STAPLETON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6089939 *Oct 21, 1998Jul 18, 2000Dyson; David B.Spinning flexible throw toy
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF41J9/16