Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS804996 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1905
Filing dateMar 10, 1905
Priority dateMar 10, 1905
Publication numberUS 804996 A, US 804996A, US-A-804996, US804996 A, US804996A
InventorsRichard A Anthony
Original AssigneeCharles Brock, Amelia V V Anthony, Richard A Anthony
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescopy.
US 804996 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED NOV. 21

R. A. ANTHONY.

TELESGOPY.

APPLICATION I'ILED numo, 1905.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

wh m coo co PATENTED NOV. 21, 1905.

R. A. ANTHONY.

TELESOOPY.

APPLIGATION FILED mam, 1905;

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

No. 804,996. PATENTED NOV. 21, 1905.

R. A. ANTHONY.

TBLESGOPY.

APPLICATION FILED MARJO, 1905.

3 SHEETSSHEET 3.

"on rrnn STATES PATENT orrion...

RICHARD A. ANTHONY, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF TO CHARLES BROOK, OF BOONTON, NEWJERSEY, AND ONEHALF TO AMELIA V. V. ANTHONY, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

} TELESCOPY.

Patented Nov. 21, 1906. I

To (all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, RICHARD A. ANTHONY, a citizen of the United States, and a resident in the borough of Manhattan, city, county, and State of New York, have made a new and useful Invention A plicable to Telescopy and Kindred Optical Aits, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 illustrates a device embodyin my invention in one of its forms and adapte to use in conjunction with an ordinary telescope. Fig. 2 illustrates apparatus likewise em odying the invention in a somewhat more elaborated form. Fig. 3 illustrates a modification of that which is shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 4 illustrates a modification of that which is shown in Fig. 1.

Heretofore in instruments of the classes stated all the light from the object or objects viewed entering the instrument has been that which could pass inwardly through a relatively small lens at the receiving or light-entering end of the apparatus, whatever it may be.

Under my present invention I utilize the laws governing the reflection of light from curved surface in the manner hereinafter ex-' plained, whereby I am enabled to collect and concentrate either upon a lens or a mirror, as the case may be, Vastly more rays of light reflected from the body or bodies to be viewed than has heretofore been possible.

In this specification I shall describe my invention as a plied to certain specific instruments or eviees hereinafter to be described; but I wish it understood that the rinciples involved, with suitable mechanlcal changes, are adaptable to transits and other instruments. I will first describe my apparatus as it is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 4, in which it is applied to telescopes, Fig. 4 being a modified construction and arrangement of the parts.

' To the tube of an ordinary telescope A,

provided with the usual object-glass B, I attach what I term a projecting-reflector C, which has the eneral interior outline or con tour of a parabola, semi-ellipse, or, in some instances, .a hyperbola. This reflector is cut off at or near its focal parameter Din other words, at its focal planeand to this a much larger exterior reflector E, which I call the receiving-reflector, is connected. It

;also is truncated or cut off at or near its parameterin other words, on its focal plane-- so that when combined these two reflectors constitute a single structure the foci of which are coincident and their axes are likewise coincident, while their larger openings face in diametrically opposite directions. The pre cise line on which the larger end of the receiving-reflector shall terminate is not necessarily fixed. It may be anywhere on the axis to the right of the focus.

The method of connecting the rejectingreflector C with the tube A may e such as preferred, or the two reflectors may be separately supported and brought into proper relation with the telescope and obj ect-glass in any preferred manner. Also the outer or receiving reflector and the inner or projecting reflector need not necessarily be physically connectcd with each other. They may be merely brought into proper relative position. V

The operation of the apparatus thus far described is as follows: The large opening of the receiving-reflector E being turned to' ward the object or objects to be viewed, the light emanating from them, owin to their distance, will enter the mouth of t e receiving-reflector in substantially parallel lines or rays and striking its inner curved surface will under the laws governing the reflection of light in such cases be thrown directly into ocus of the receiving-reflector, and since the this focus is likewise the focus of the projecting-reflector C the rays of light after crossing the foci will 'impin e on the inner curved surface of the projecting-reflector and again following the said laws will be projected therefrom, if it be a parabolo'id,in lines parallel 'to the axis of the reflectors direct upon the object-glass of the telescope, which is laced at the larger end of the projecting-re ector, as shown.

It will be clear to those who are familiar with this subject that whereas under the old art the rays of light which entered the telesco e were only those which impinged upon an passed through the object-glass in my improved construction I secure vastly bet- '2 so4,99e

light-rays. This requires no further description.

It will at once be obvious, however, to those who .are familiar with this 'art that a combination of lenses of such conformation 70 as desired to accomplish any specific result or a single lens havin such conformation as desired may be substituted. The construction I show is intended to be illustrative only. For the accomplishment of certain results, 75 which need not here be discussed, it will be found-desirable to give to the receiving-lens or object-glass the contour of a parabola, hyperbola, or semi-ellipse.

he laws governing the reflection of light- 80 rays from parabolic, elli tical, and hyperbolic surfaces are well un erstood and do not require specific explanation here except to say that when the subject is at a great distance the receiving-reflector should prefer- 85 ably have parabolic contour, because the rays of light coming from such distances .are, for all practical purposes, parallel, and hence im inging upon the inner surface of a parabol ic' receiver will be deflected directly to its focus, resulting in. the advantages above explained. If, on the contrary, an. object or objects relatively close at hand are to be of rays which fall directly upon it, but, on the contrary, all the rays which fall within the enlarged open mouth of the receiving-reflector, (except those that fall directly upon the parameter of the larger reflector and do not ass through into the projectin -reflector.) Ihe number 'of such lost rays, l iowever, is exceedingly small in comparison with the number which are collected, concentrated, 1c and utilized under In invention. The area of the open mouth of the receiving-reflector may be ractically without limit. Indeed, I contemp ate making it many feet in diameter should occasion require.

Referring now to Fig.4,in which the parts are or may be the same as above described, as a matter of convenience and for conservation of space instead of having the telescope tube A and the object-glass B arranged on the axial line of the reflectors I arrange them at right angles thereto, and in order to secure rectangular deflection of the collected and concentrated rays I employ a mirror F at an an le of forty-five degrees to the axes z 5 of the re ectors, upon which mirror the projected rays'will impinge and be deflected rectangularl as shown.

eferring now to Figs. 2 and 3, it will be noted that when the apparatus illustrated in 0 Fig. 1 is employed the position of the image is inverted, and although under certain circumstances this will be of no consequence, yet in other cases it will be objectionable. In order, .therefore, that t e image as repro 3 5 duced may be in its actual or erect position, I sometimes construct and arrange the apparatus as illustrated in Fi s. 2 and 3, in which the parts, so far as they have been above described, are correspondingly lettered-that 0 is to say, E is the exterior or receiving reflector, D the focus thereof, C the projecting-reflector. To this reflector I connect at its open or rearmo'st end a counterpart reflector C, the focus of which is at D, and to this,

still at the left, I connect or locate another projecting-reflector G, combined with which may be the object-glass B of the telescopetube A. l

The operation of the apparatus shown in Fi 2 is substantially the same as that shown inIig. 1, excepting that owing to what I call the secondary reflection of the light-rays the object is reproduced at the object-glass in its erect instead of inverted position. The

5 5 combined reflectors C and C may bemade in any preferred manner. I have shown them as-made from two parabolic reflectors connected at their larger diameters, as shown in drawings.

In Fi :3 substantially the same construction is il ustrated as that shown in Fig, 2, ex- 3. The com ination of a telescope-tube a ceptin that the reflecting-mirror F, subreceiving-reflector and a projecting-reflector,

stantil y the same in function and method of whose interior surfaces diverge in curved operation as that shown in Fig. 4, ma be lines from their axes, both truncated at'or used to secure rectangular projection o the near their respective focal planes, and hav- I30 ceiver will collect and measurably, or at least to a large extent, concentrate them'at the de- "sired point.

It will be obvious to those who are familiar with this art that modifications may be made in the details of construction of the apparatus 10 5 shown and described by me without departing from the essentials of the invention. I therefore do not limit myself to such details.

claim 1'. The combination of a telescope-tube a no receiving-reflector and a projecting-reflector, whose interior surfaces diverge in curved ing their foci and axes coincident, and a lens, for the purpose set forth.

2. The combination of a telescope-tube a receiving-reflector and a projecting-reflector, whose interior surfaces diverge in curved lines from their axes, both truncated at or near their respective focal planes, and having their foci and axes coincident, and a lens located in or near the projecting-reflector and adapted to receive the rays projected therefrom, for the urpose set forth. I2 5 I arranged at an angle relative to the axis of the projecting-reflector and adapted to receive the rays projected therefromand to deflect them, for the purpose set forth.

4. The combination of a telescope-tube a receiving-reflector and a projecting-reflector, whose interior surfaces diverge in curved lines from their axes, both truncated at or near their respective focal planes, and havingtheir foci and axes coincident, a mirror arranged at an angle relative to the axis of the projecting-reflector and adapted to receive the rays projected therefrom and to deflect them, and a lens, for the purpose set forth.

5. The combination of a telescope-tube, a rece1v1ng-reflector for collecting and concentrating rays of light, the interior surface whereof diverges in curved lines from its axis, and which is truncated at or near its parameter or focal plane, whereby the rays of light received at its larger open end will be collected, concentrated and passed through the opening at its focus.

6. The combination of a telescope-tube a receiving-reflector, the interior surface whereof diverges in curved lines from its axis and which is truncated at or near its focal plane, and an ellipsoid, or double paraboloid reflector truncated at or near both foci, and a proj'ecting-reflector, the interior surface whereof diverges in curved lines from its axis and which is truncated at or near its focus, all being suitably arranged with reference to their respective foci and having a common axial line, for the purpose set forth.

7. The combination of a telescopeetube a receiving-reflector, the interior surface whereof diverges in curved lines from its axis and which is truncated at or near its focal lane,

an ellipsoid, or double paraboloid re ector truncated at or near both foci, a projecting:

reflector, the interior surface whereof -1- verges in curved lines from its axis and which is truncated at or near its focus, all being suitably arran ed with reference to their respective foci an having a common axial line, and a lens combined with the projectingreflector and adapted to receive the rays projected therefrom, for the pur ose set forth.

8. The combination of a te escope-tube a receiving-reflector, the interior surface whereof diverges in curved lines from its axis and which is truncated at or near its focal plane, and an ellipsoid, or double paraboloid reflector truncated at or near both foci, and a projecting-reflector, the interior surface whereof diverges in curved lines from its axis and which is truncated at or near its focus, all being suitably arranged with reference to their foci and having a common axial line, and a mirror arranged at an angle relative to the 'axis of' the projecting-reflector and adapted to receive the rays projected therefrom and to deflect them, for the purpose set forth.

9. The combination of a telescope-tube a receiving-reflector, the interior surface where:

of diverges in curvedlines from its axis and which is truncated at or near its focal lane, an ellipsoid, or double paraboloid re ector truncated at or near both foci, and a projecting-reflector, the interior surface whereof diverges in curved lines from its axis and which is truncated at or near its focus, all being suitably arranged with reference to their foci and having a'coinmon axial line, a mirror arranged at an angle relative to the axis of the projecting-reflector and adapted to receive the rays projected therefrom and to deflect them, and a lens, for the purpose set forth.

In testimony, whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence oftwo subscribing witnesses.

RICHARD A. ANTHONY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2457253 *Dec 22, 1947Dec 28, 1948Martin Clifford WReflecting optical objective system
US2628533 *Oct 17, 1951Feb 17, 1953Robert A OetjenImage forming optical reflecting and converging mirror device
US2661657 *Aug 15, 1947Dec 8, 1953Barr & Stroud LtdBinocular observation instrument
US2759106 *May 20, 1952Aug 14, 1956Hans WolterOptical image-forming mirror system providing for grazing incidence of rays
US2766385 *Sep 8, 1953Oct 9, 1956Gunther HerrnringOptical image-forming plural reflecting mirror systems
US2882784 *Oct 24, 1955Apr 21, 1959Toffolo Dominic SConical refractor
US2911878 *Oct 14, 1957Nov 10, 1959George E VernierUnderwater viewers
US3229579 *Dec 27, 1961Jan 18, 1966Aerojet General CoSolar energy collector
US3297390 *Nov 5, 1962Jan 10, 1967Walter G FinchOptical sighting instrument utilizing two annular conical reflecting surfaces
US3784836 *Oct 6, 1972Jan 8, 1974Sybron CorpIr generator having ellipsoidal and paraboloidal reflectors
US3899672 *Feb 19, 1974Aug 12, 1975Univ ChicagoSolar energy collection
US4655555 *Nov 28, 1984Apr 7, 1987Carl-Zeiss-StiftungObjective with aspheric surfaces for imaging microzones
US4712885 *Oct 31, 1985Dec 15, 1987Loral Electro-Optical Systems, Inc.Laser diode optical system
US4815858 *Oct 9, 1987Mar 28, 1989The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyReflectometers
US4988205 *Jan 17, 1989Jan 29, 1991The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyReflectometers
US5058982 *Aug 10, 1990Oct 22, 1991Orbot Systems Ltd.Illumination system and inspection apparatus including same
US5810469 *Mar 26, 1993Sep 22, 1998Weinreich; SteveCombination light concentrating and collimating device and light fixture and display screen employing the same
US6437312May 5, 2000Aug 20, 2002Orbotech, Ltd.Illumination for inspecting surfaces of articles
US6832843Jul 23, 2002Dec 21, 2004Orbotech, Ltd.Illumination for inspecting surfaces of articles
US6847442Jun 16, 1998Jan 25, 2005Orbotech, Ltd.Illuminator for inspecting substantially flat surfaces
US6964485Jan 23, 2002Nov 15, 2005Carl Zeiss Smt AgCollector for an illumination system with a wavelength of less than or equal to 193 nm
US7215417Jan 7, 2005May 8, 2007Orbotech Ltd.Illuminator for inspecting substantially flat surfaces
US8134687Aug 23, 2005Mar 13, 2012Carl Zeiss Smt GmbhIllumination system of a microlithographic exposure apparatus
US20030043455 *Jan 23, 2002Mar 6, 2003Wolfgang SingerCollector for an illumination system with a wavelength of less than or equal to 193 nm
US20050002090 *Jun 25, 2004Jan 6, 2005Carl Zeiss Smt AgEUV illumination system having a folding geometry
US20080212327 *Aug 23, 2005Sep 4, 2008Carl Zeiss Smt AgIllumination System of a Microlithographic Exposure Apparatus
US20080225258 *Feb 27, 2008Sep 18, 2008Carl Zeiss Smt AgEUV illumination system having a folding geometry
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG02B17/0892, G03F7/70225