Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS805981 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1905
Filing dateOct 22, 1903
Priority dateOct 22, 1903
Publication numberUS 805981 A, US 805981A, US-A-805981, US805981 A, US805981A
InventorsReuben A Mitchell, Lester L Lewis
Original AssigneeReuben A Mitchell, Lester L Lewis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump attachment for internal-combustion engines.
US 805981 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED Nov. 23, 1905. R. A'. MITCHELL & L. 1.. LEWIS. PUMP ATTACHMENT FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES.

APPLIGATIQN FILED OUT. 22,1903.

ammtom I WWPMZ M UNITED f STATES REUBEN A. MITCHELL AND PATENT OFFICE.

LESTER L. LEWIS, OF ()IL CITY, PENN- SYLVANIA.

PUMP ATTACHMENT F'ORINTEIRNAL-CIOMBUSTION ENGINES.

' Specification of Letters Patent.

.Patented. Nov. 28, 1905 Application filed October 22, 1903- Serial No. 178,091.

tion oftheinvention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it 'appertains'to.

make and use the same.

This invention relates to improvementslin pumping devices, and moreparticularly to pumping mechanisms adapted to be connected I to an internal-combustion engine.

The object in view is the provision of elements positioned forbeing actuated by the live pressure of an internal-combustion eninvention comprises the combination, with an internal-combustion engine, of a tube communicating with the explosion end of the cylinderof said engine and a pumping mechanism connected with and receiving its operating power through said tube.

It further comprises certain other novel constructions, combinations, and arrangements' of parts, as will be hereinafter fully described and claimed...

In the accompanying drawing, the figure represents a vertical central section taken through a mechanism embodying the features of the present invention, parts being illustrated in elevation.

It is of course well known in the art that the manual starting of a gas-engine is extremely dangerous and many modes of mechanically accomplishingthis operation has been suggested, including supplying compressed air for imparting the initial stroke to the piston, and the present invention contemplates the provision of means for compressing air or other gas and storing the same for the use mentioned. 7

In carrying out this invention we employ the elements disclosed in the accompanying drawing; in which 1 indicates a cylinder of any common form of gas-engine, and'2 the piston thereof, actuillustrated.)

I I ating fly-wheel 3 through a crank-shaft. (Not The cylinder 1 is of course pro:

vided with any common and well-known form ,of intake mechanism(not illustrated) and is provided with an exhaust-valve 4,.actuated in any preferred manner for permitting the escape of burnt gases at the time the piston 2 reaches the extreme of its receding stroke.

A' tube 5 extends through the head of cylinder 1 into the firing or explosion end thereof, said tube communicating with a storagetank 6, any suitable valve 7: being interposed in the length of said tube for'closing communication between said tank and cylinder, A branch pipe 8 leads from pipe 5 and is controlled by an interposed valve 9, said branch pipe communicating with a cylinder 10, within which is arranged a piston-head 11, secured to a piston 12, extending through the upper end of cylinder 10 into a cylinder 13, preferably of considerable greater diameter than the cylinder 10. A suitable spring ltis coiled aboutthe piston-rod 12 and presses at one end against the cylinder 10 and at the opposite end against the piston-head 11 for normally retainingsaid head near that end of cylinder 10 penetrated by the pipe 8. A piston-head 15 fits snugly within the cylinder 13 and is fixed to the upper end of piston-rod 12. The opposite end of cylinder 13 from that penetrated by piston-rod 12 is provided with a housing 16,

carrying a" check-valve 17 and its seat 18, the said housing being formed with a recess 19 between 'the said seat and the cylinder 13'. Carried centrally by the piston-head 15' is a I plug 20, of a diameter equal to the diameter of the recess 19, in line with said recess and adapted when the piston-head is at the uppermost limit of its stroke to fit snugly Within said recess. A comparatively small passage 21 extends longitudinally centrally through the plug and is curved outwardly and opens at one side of said plug near the piston 16 for purposes hereinafter mentioned.

An intake check-valve 22 is positioned for I supplying the air or the gas through a tube 23 to the cylinder 13, said valve being positioned for opening as the piston 15 drops and closing as said piston rises. I

In operation, presuming the tank 6 to be filled with a compressed chargeand the piston 2 to be in the position indicated in the draw- IOO ing, the valve 7 is open and the charge passing from tank 6 through tube 5, entering cylinder 1, will throw the piston 2, and thus start the operation of the engine, the valve 7 being closed as soon as the piston 2 has reached the limit of its receding stroke. After the piston 2 has been started in its movement the operation of the same is continued through the explosion of gaseous charges compressed and ignited within the cylinder 1. The starting of the piston 2 of course exhausts to some degree at least the charge within the tank 6, and in order to recharge said tank the valve 9 is opened, and each time a charge is exploded within the cylinder 1 a portion of the expanding gases will enter the tube 5 and passing through the branch pipe 8 will act against the piston-head 11, throwing the same, with its piston-rod 12, upwardly, and thus lifting piston 15. The outward movement of the piston will compress the air within the cylinder 13 and force the same past the valve 18 through a communicating tube 24 to the tank 6. It will be observed that the expansion of the exploded gases will of course efiect a comparatively sudden movement of the piston-head 11, and in order to prevent the piston-head 15 striking against the upper head of the cylinder 13 we have provided the plug 20, which produces an air-cushion by closing to some degree the outlet from said cylinder. As the upper or free end of the plug enters the recess 19, all the air within the cylinder 13 betweenthe piston-head 15 and the upper head of said cylinder must be discharged through the passage 21, and as said passage is restricted the said atmosphere forms an aircushion for the piston 15. As the piston 15 continues to move upwardly after the plug 20 has entered the recess 19, the air is discharged from cylinder 13 through the passage 21, and when the piston 15 has reached the limit of its upward movement the valve 17 is automatically seated by the action of its spring, and but for the passage 21 the return stroke of the piston 15 would produce a vacuum within the recess 19. The formation of vacuum is avoided by the admission of air through valve 22 and passage 21 to the recess 19, whereby the piston 15 is free to move easily back to its former position ready for a second operation. As the piston 22 continues to operate, the operation of pistons 11 and 15 maybe continued until the desired amount of pressure is obtained within the tank 6, when the valve 9 is closed and the operation of the air-compressing pump thereby stopped.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the present improvement is in the nature of an attachment adapted to be applied to any ordinary gas-engine and to receive power through the explosion of the charge within the gasengine without in any way interfering with the operation of the engine or necessitating any alteration in the construction thereof, so that the present improved pump and attachment may be applied to any of the ordinary gas-engines now in use.

While we have illustrated and described the present improved pump attachment as employed forstoring compressed air as a medium of power for starting an engine, we of course do not propose to be limited thereby in the structures hereinafter set forth in the claims to the art stated, said structures being clearly capable of supplying compressed air or' other gas for any purpose whatever.

As above intimated, the violent throw of the pumppiston 15 must be cushioned or else the same will partially or completely destroy the head of the pump-cylinder 13, and the required cushion is secured by the employment of the plug 21, which acts to restrict the discharge of compressed air from the pumpeylinder 13, and as the plug 21 enters the recess 19 the degree of resistance of the cushion will increase in a ratio proportionate to the distance and speed of travel of the piston 15 toward the upper end of the cylinder 13. Thus it is seen that the cushioning eflfect on the piston 15 is graduated and increased toward the termination of the stroke of the piston, and. it is to be noted that the cushion is obtained by the restriction of the discharge from the pump-cylinder, which restriction of course may be accomplished in numerous ways, all within the scope of the present invention and differing from the illustrative embodiment indicated in the drawing and above described.

Having thus fully described our invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. In a mechanism of the class described, the combination with a gas-engine, of a cylinder connected to and communicating with the explosion end of the cylinder of said engine, a piston within said first-mentioned cylinder adapted to be actuated by the pressure from the gas-engine cylinder, means actuated by the piston of said firstmentioned cylinder for compressing a charge of air or gas, and means for cushioning the termination of the operation of the compressing means.

2. In a mechanism of the class described, the combination with a gas-engine cylinder and a piston operating therein, of a pump-cylinder, a pump-piston arranged therein independent of the gas-engine piston, means actuated by the explosion of the gaseous charge of the gasengine for operating said pump-piston, and means for producing acushioning effect upon the pump-piston as the same approaches the termination of its stroke.

3. In a mechanism of the class described, the combination with a gas-engine cylinder and a piston operating therein, of a pump-cylinder, a pump-piston independent of the gas-engine piston arranged within the pump-cylinder free for having the full stroke for the entire length of the pump-cylinder, means driven by the explosion of the gaseous charge of the gas-engine cylinder for operating said pump-piston, and means for producing a cushion Within the pump-cylinder for retarding the terminatio of the stroke of said pump-piston.

4:. In a mechanism of the class described, the combination with a gas-engine, of a cylinder formed with an apertured recess, a checkvalve closing the aperture of said recess, a piston within said cylinder, a plug carried by said piston and adaptedto fit within said recess,-

combination with a gas-engine of a cylinder formed with an apertured recess, a valve normally closing the aperture of said recess, an intake-valve for said cylinder, a piston'within the cylinder, a plug projecting from said piston in line with said recess and formed with a restricted passage extending from its free end to one side thereof near said piston, and means actuated by the charge within said engine for reciprocating the piston.

7. In amechanism of the class described,- the combination with agas-engine cylinder and a piston therefor, of a cylinderspaced from and connected with the cylinder of said g'as-engine, an exhaust and an intake-valve for the first-mentioned cylinder, a piston within said last-mentioned cylinder independent of saidfirst-mentioned piston, means actuated by the exploded charge within said gas-engine for reciprocating said piston, and means for producing a cushion for the last-mentioned piston.

8. In a mechanism of the class described, the combination with a gas-engine, of a cylinder communicating therewith, a pumping-piston arranged within said cylinder, and adapted to be actuated by exploded gases supplied through said communication between said cylinder and said gas-engine, and means for producing a cushioning effect upon the pumpingpiston at the termination of a pumping stroke thereof. V

9. In a mechanism of the class'described, the combination with a gas-engine, of a cylinder spaced therefrom, a tube communicating between said cylinder and the explosion end of the piston.

said gas-engine, a pumping-piston arranged within said cylinder in position for beingsubjected to and actuated by the charge of live pressure admitted through said tube, and means for producing acushioningeffect upon said piston atthe conclusion of a pumping stroke thereof.

10. In a mechanism of the class described, the combination with a gas-engine, ofa cylinder spaced therefrom, a tube communicating between said cylinder and the explosion end of said gas-engine, a pumping-piston arranged within the cylinder, in position for be. ing driven by live pressure admitted through said tube, and means for producing a cushion between said piston and the end of said cylinder at the termination of a pumping stroke of 11 In a mechanism of the class described, the combination witha gas-engine cylinder, and a piston therefor, of a pump-cylinder, a pump-piston arranged within said pump-cylinder independent of said engine-piston and free to move the full length of said pumpcylinder, means actuated by the exploded charge of gas within said engine-cylinder for operating said pump-piston, and means for producing a gaseous cushion between the pump-piston and the pump-cylinder just prior to the termination of the working stroke of v the pump-piston.

12. In a mechanism of the class described, the combination with a gas-engine cylinder, and a piston operating therein, of a pumpcylinder, a pump piston operating therein, means independent of said first-mentioned piston and arranged to be actuated by the exploded charge within said gas-engine cylinder for. actuating said pump-piston, and means for. producing an increasing, graduated cushion for the termination of the stroke of said pump-piston.

13. In a mechanism of the class described, the combination with a gas-engine of a cylinder formed with a recess in one of its heads,

.a piston within said cylinder, means actuated by the charge within said engine for recipro-' cating said piston, an intake-valve and an exhaust-valve for said cylinder, a plug carried by said piston in line with said recess and adapted to enter the same when the piston is at one extreme of its movement, and means signatures in presence of two witnesses.

REUBEN A. MITCHELL. LESTER L. LEWIS. Witnesses:

JOHN M. McGILL, WM. H. WINTERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2889084 *Mar 16, 1956Jun 2, 1959Sam TourAgricultural sprayer
US4012174 *Oct 20, 1975Mar 15, 1977Caterpillar Tractor Co.Fuel priming pump
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF02B2075/025