Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS8061698 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/584,204
Publication dateNov 22, 2011
Filing dateOct 20, 2006
Priority dateJul 27, 2006
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS20080023898, WO2008013652A2, WO2008013652A3
Publication number11584204, 584204, US 8061698 B2, US 8061698B2, US-B2-8061698, US8061698 B2, US8061698B2
InventorsRichard L. Palinkas
Original AssigneeChemtura Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Geometric shaped side bearing pad
US 8061698 B2
Abstract
A geometric shaped side bearing pad includes a top and a surface extending an angle θ towards the top, wherein the bearing pad has a geometric shape and a non-linear spring rate which levels out a reaction force without buckling. The surface of the bearing pad can have two sides or four sides, can have spacing within the surface, or can be solid. The angle θ can be within the range of about 20 degrees and 85 degrees, and may preferably be within the range of about 30 degrees and 45 degrees to achieve non-linear load/deflection. The top of the bearing pad can have a slot defined therethrough to accommodate a protrusion in a fixture to engage the bearing pad. The bearing pad can provide a friction contact with an object and enables lateral force transfer to the bearing pad, thereby providing lateral stiffness.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(11)
1. A bearing pad comprising:
a top and a base parallel to the top;
a slot in the top, wherein the top defines a top plane and wherein the slot is through the top plane, and the slot is completely surrounded by the top; and
four walls each having an inner surface and an outer surface that connect the top and the base,
wherein the inner and outer surface of each of said walls extend at an angle from 30 to 45 degrees from the base towards the top
and the inner surface of each of said four walls, top and base define a cavity that extends through said slot, and
the cavity does not extend through any of the four walls or the base,
wherein the bearing pad has a non-linear spring rate which levels out a reaction force applied to the top and base without buckling.
2. A bearing pad according to claim 1, wherein an initial length lo of each of the four walls formed so that lo is greater than a critical length lcr, where lcr lo(1−π2/s2) and s is a slenderness ratio of the surface.
3. A bearing pad according to claim 1, wherein the slot is configured to accommodate a protrusion in a fixture to engage the bearing pad.
4. A bearing pad according to claim 1, wherein the bearing pad comprises polyurethane.
5. A bearing pad according to claim 4, wherein the bearing pad comprises thermoset polyurethane.
6. A bearing pad according to claim 4, wherein the bearing pad comprises thermoplastic polyurethane.
7. A bearing pad according to claim 4, wherein the bearing pad comprises two part castable urethanes made from polyether-isocyanate prepolymers cured with organic diamine materials.
8. A bearing pad according to claim 4, wherein the bearing pad comprises two part castable urethanes made from polyether-isocyanate prepolymers cured with polyol materials.
9. A bearing pad according to claim 4, wherein the bearing pad comprises two part castable urethanes made from polyester-isocyanate prepolymers cured with organic diamine materials.
10. A bearing pad according to claim 4, wherein the bearing pad comprises two part castable urethanes made from polyester-isocyanate prepolymers cured with organic polyol materials.
11. A bearing pad according to claim 3, wherein the slot provides a friction contact with the protrusion, and wherein the slot enables a lateral force transfer from the protrusion to the bearing pad.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/495,409, filed Jul. 27, 2006, now abandoned the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention generally relates to bearings and, more particularly, to a geometric shaped side bearing pad.

2. Description of the Related Art

Rail cars are typically equipped with wheeled trucks including side bearings that are adapted, for example, to absorb energy in response to large impact loads, to control or restrict hunting movements of the rail cars, to decrease warping tendencies of the rail cars, to provide better curving characteristics of the rail cars, etc. Truck hunting occurs during movement of a rail car over tracks or rails and is caused mainly by worn wheels and/or worn rail. Truck hunting can lead to rapid truck component wear and can cause high speed derailments.

Side bearing developments to reduce or otherwise control adverse truck action have been ongoing for years. For example, side bearings have been developed with various types of springs, hydraulics dampers, yaw dampers, etc. Some side bearings use compressed resilient members, such as spring loaded members, elastomeric members, etc. Side bearing pads have normally been formed as straight cylinders or columns, toroids, or metal-rubber sandwich structures.

Side bearings have also used different forms of thermoplastic elastomers to absorb necessary forces encountered in railroad cars, and typically require special fixturing. U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,962,916, 6,419,214 B2, and 6,723,771 B2, issued Oct. 16, 1990, Jul. 16, 2002, and Apr. 20, 2004, respectively, to at least the present inventor, describe compression springs, non-linear spring rate sway bar bushings, and high friction polyurethane elastomers having improved abrasion resistance, and are incorporated herein by reference.

A side bearing pad having a spring rate that allows the storage of deflection energy while limiting reaction force is desirable.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a geometric shaped side bearing pad for any suspension or spring application for which energy needs to be absorbed while controlling the maximum reaction force, such as side bearers, dock fendering, ride bumpers, certain impact bumpers, etc. The bearing pad may be used with many existing bearing boxes that previously held other types of bearing pads, such as the rubber metal sandwich pad. The bearing pad provides a non-linear spring rate that levels out the reaction force without buckling. The bearing pad does not need bonding.

According to one aspect of the present invention, a bearing pad includes a top and a surface extending an angle θ towards the top, wherein the bearing pad has a geometric shape and a non-linear spring rate that levels out the reaction force without buckling.

The geometric shape of the bearing pad can be a pyramid shape, a conical shape, a trapezoidal shape, a prismoid shape, etc. For example, as a pyramid shape, the surface of the bearing pad can have two or four sides, and can have spacing within the surface, or can be solid. The initial length l0 of the surface can be formed so that l0 is greater than a critical length lcr, where lcr=l0(1−π2/s2) and s is a slenderness ratio of the surface. When the bearing pad has spacing within the surface, the non-linear spring rate decreases with deflection.

The angle θ can be within the range of about 20 degrees and 85 degree, and may preferably be within the range of about 30 degrees and 45 degrees to achieve non-linear load/deflection. The top of the bearing pad can have a slot defined therethrough to accommodate a protrusion in a fixture to engage the bearing pad. The bearing pad can provide a friction contact with an object and enables lateral force transfer to the bearing pad, thereby providing lateral stiffness. The bearing pad can include polyurethane, such as thermoset polyurethane, thermoplastic polyurethane, or a two part castable urethanes made from polyether-isocyanate or polyester-isocyanate prepolymers cured with organic diamine or polyol materials.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be more apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a geometric shaped side bearing pad according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the side bearing pad shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a top view of the side bearing pad shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the side bearing pad shown in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Hereinafter, preferred embodiments according to the present invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings. The same reference numerals are used to designate the same elements as those shown in other drawings. In the following description, a detailed description of known functions and configurations incorporated herein will be omitted when it may obscure the subject matter of the present invention.

Referring to the drawings, FIGS. 1-4 show a geometric shaped side bearing pad 10 according to the present invention. As shown in FIG. 1, the bearing pad 10 is contained within a bearing box 100 which forms no part of the invention. The geometric shape of the bearing pad can be a pyramid shape, a conical shape, a trapezoidal shape, a prismoid shape, etc. For example, as a pyramid shape, as shown in the drawings, the surface of the bearing pad 10 can have two or four sides, and can have spacing within the surface, or can be solid. The surface of the bearing pad 10 is shown with four sides that interconnect a base 20 and a top 22. However, the surface of the bearing pad 10 may be configured in a pyramid shape without the base 20 and end sides, having only two longitudinal sides, thereby simplifying the fabrication of the bearing pad 10. The base 20, when used, has a length and width. When formed as a conical shape, the surface of the bearing pad 10 would have a smooth surface extending from a circular base to a pointed top.

The illustrated surface of the bearing pad 10 has two longitudinal sides along the length of the bearing pad 10 that extend at an angle θ between a first end 24 of the base 20, a second end 26 of the base 20, and the top 22 of the bearing pad 10. The end sides along the width of the bearing pad 10 also extend at the angle θ between the base 20 and the top 22, when the end sides are used.

The top 22 of the bearing pad 10 is a height above the base 20. The top 22 has a slot 30 defined therethrough to accommodate a protrusion in a fixture to engage the bearing pad 10, provide a friction contact with an object, such as a rail car, and enable lateral force transfer to the bearing pad 10, thereby providing lateral stiffness. The surface and base 20 of the bearing pad 10 are restrained from moving out when under load. The bearing pad 10 does not need bonding. The coupling of the bearing pad 10 to an object, such as a rail car, may alternatively be by direct contact with a metal surface on the object using metal to elastomer friction to provide lateral constraint. A metal plate can also be bonded to the top of the bearing pad 10, as opposed to the slot 30. The bearing pad 10 is configured with a non-linear spring rate that levels out the reaction force while absorbing deflection energy without buckling.

The angle θ is within the range of about 20 degrees and 85 degree and, depending on the desired non-linear or linear spring rate, the angle θ may preferably be within the range of about 30 degrees and 45 degrees to achieve non-linear load/deflection. A linear spring rate can occur at various angles greater than about 60 degrees. For example, when the angle θ is about 60 degrees, the spring rate is linear. The angled surface enables the bearing pad 10 to resist buckling while being compressed. The angle θ chosen for a particular application can control the maximum reaction force.

The angle θ also provides clearance from the bearing box 100 when compressed. The base 20 of the bearing pad 10, when used, can be configured for being substantially aligned with a particular bearing box cavity. The bearing pad 10 preferably has spacing within the surface, the surface having a wall thickness, however, the bearing pad 10 may also be solid. When the bearing pad 10 has spacing between within the surface, the bearing pad 10 has a non-linear spring rate which decreases slowly with deflection to level out the reaction force without buckling. When the bearing pad 10 is solid, the bearing pad 10 has a non-linear spring rate which increases with deflection.

The length of the surface of the bearing pad 10 should be greater than a length where the surface buckles due to applied force, e.g. a critical length lcr. The critical length lcr of the surface may be determined through use of the initial length of side, with no applied force, e.g. l0, and the slenderness ratio s of the surface, as defined by lcr=l0(1−π2/s2). The slenderness ratio s is a ratio based on the height and the radius of gyration of the surface, the computation of which is well known to those the structural arts.

The bearing pad 10 is preferably made of polyurethane, such as thermoset polyurethane, thermoplastic polyurethane, etc. The bearing pad 10 may also be made from DuPont Hytrel, a similar polymer, rubber, etc. Thermoset polyurethane provides a durable, resilient material that has good low and high temperature modulus retention, and has a higher modulus than a typical rubber compound. For example, the polyurethanes may be two part castable urethanes made from polyether-isocyanate or polyester-isocyanate prepolymers cured with organic diamine or polyol materials, such as ADRIENEŽ and VIBRATHANEŽ prepolymers.

The bearing pad 10 may be used for any suspension or spring application for which energy needs to be absorbed while controlling the maximum reaction force, such as side bearers, dock fendering, ride bumpers, certain impact bumpers, etc. The bearing pad 10 may be used with many existing bearing boxes that previously held other types of bearing pads, such as the rubber metal sandwich pad. The bearing pad 10 can also provide a non-linear spring rate that levels out the reaction force while absorbing deflection energy without buckling.

As compared to sandwich type bearing pads, the bearing pad 10 does not need bonding and has a more desirable non-linear spring rate. As compared to column type bearing pads, the bearing pad 10 fits into existing fixturing and has a more non-linear decreasing spring rate when the bearing pad 10 has spacing within the surface to level out the reaction force without buckling. The bearing pad 10 also requires no special fixturing and can have a decreasing spring rate when the bearing pad 10 has spacing within the surface, as opposed to an increasing spring rate of toroidal type bearing pads.

Although preferred embodiments of the present invention have been described for illustrative purposes, those skilled in the art will appreciate that various modifications, additions and substitutions are possible, without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention as disclosed in the accompanying claims, including the full scope of equivalents thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2813712 *Sep 30, 1953Nov 19, 1957Studebaker Packard CorpRubber bumpers
US2817510 *Sep 4, 1953Dec 24, 1957Gen Motors CorpRebound bumper
US3418815 *May 24, 1967Dec 31, 1968Seibu Gomu Kagaku KkDock fender
US3708988 *May 21, 1970Jan 9, 1973Siebu Gomu Kagaku K KFender assembly
US3779536 *Jan 31, 1972Dec 18, 1973Clouth Gummiwerke AgBuffer or fender
US3820495 *Feb 7, 1973Jun 28, 1974Bridgestone Tire Co LtdFender
US3831923 *Jan 12, 1973Aug 27, 1974Ace ControlsNoise preventing shock absorber
US3932005 *May 10, 1974Jan 13, 1976Uniroyal Inc.Elastomeric railway car with side bearing
US3948500 *Jul 18, 1974Apr 6, 1976Pneumatiques Caoutchouc Manufacture Et Plastiques Kleber-ColombesShock absorbers for mooring guards
US4277055 *Dec 26, 1978Jul 7, 1981Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd.Cushioning fender
US4319539 *Dec 26, 1978Mar 16, 1982Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd.Cushioning fender assembly
US4356775Oct 11, 1979Nov 2, 1982H. Neil PatonDamped railway car suspension
US4463836Sep 30, 1982Aug 7, 1984Holland Co.Snap-on slide bearing for U-section type unit brake beam guide lugs
US4471857May 12, 1982Sep 18, 1984Holland Co.Guide bearing for mounting unit brake beams
US4480721Sep 23, 1982Nov 6, 1984Holland CompanySnap-on slide bearing for recessed type guide lugs of unit brake beams
US4548150 *Aug 11, 1982Oct 22, 1985Drewett Glen EReadily replaceable bumper guard support and bumper for water covered areas
US4567833Sep 20, 1984Feb 4, 1986Holland CompanyComposite constant contact side bearing for railroad cars
US4712487Jul 17, 1986Dec 15, 1987Miner Enterprises, Inc.Side bearing unit for railroad car, including method of making
US4756266 *Feb 27, 1987Jul 12, 1988Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd.Elastically deformable fender
US4895355 *Aug 20, 1987Jan 23, 1990Woco Franz-Josef Wolf & Co.Spring device for use in mounting apparatuses
US4962861May 1, 1989Oct 16, 1990A. Stucki CompanyArticulated connector
US4962916Nov 17, 1989Oct 16, 1990Uniroyal Chemical Company, Inc.Compression spring
US5036774Jan 31, 1990Aug 6, 1991Thrall Car Manufacturing CompanyLong-travel side bearing for an articulated railroad car
US5054414 *May 2, 1990Oct 8, 1991Sumitomo Rubber IndustriesHollow rubber fender
US5118086Feb 6, 1990Jun 2, 1992Material Engineering Research Laboratory Ltd.Elastomeric spring with non-linear force/deflection characteristics
US5119833 *Mar 15, 1991Jun 9, 1992Argus CorporationCompressible foam earplug
US5137313 *Sep 23, 1991Aug 11, 1992Ruan Leasing CompanyPallet bumper for truck trailers
US5293973 *Dec 3, 1992Mar 15, 1994Volkswagen AgDeformation member having an eversion portion
US5358684Aug 19, 1992Oct 25, 1994Jurid Werke GmbhFriction lining for disk brakes, more particularly for road vehicles and rail vehicles
US5417531 *Feb 9, 1994May 23, 1995Brown; Gordon A.Locking cam anchor apparatus
US5419539 *Aug 16, 1993May 30, 1995Freudenberg-Nok General PartnershipElastomeric shock absorber with positioning insert
US5458077 *Mar 28, 1994Oct 17, 1995Bridgestone CorporationMarine fenders
US5718543Dec 26, 1995Feb 17, 1998Miner Enterprises, Inc.Method and apparatus for processing a side bearing component for railroad cars
US5988609 *Oct 27, 1997Nov 23, 1999Young; James A.Elastomeric tubular stop member
US6092470Dec 3, 1998Jul 25, 2000Miner Enterprises, Inc.Railroad car side bearing with thermal insulator
US6158726 *May 11, 1998Dec 12, 2000Freudenberg Nok-General PartnershipIntegrated cup insert jounce bumper
US6247564 *Jun 20, 2000Jun 19, 2001Hyundai Motor CompanyAutomotive suspension locking device
US6328145 *Sep 28, 1999Dec 11, 2001Alstom HoldingsImpact damping structure
US6419214Sep 27, 1999Jul 16, 2002Uniroyal Chamical Company, Inc.Non-linear spring rate sway bar bushing
US6572307 *Dec 20, 2000Jun 3, 2003Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd.Fender with step and/or projection
US6604735 *Nov 29, 2001Aug 12, 2003Lockheed Martin CorporationElastomer variants
US6708624Jul 19, 2001Mar 23, 2004Hansen, Inc.Side bearing with multi-purpose mounting points
US6723771Mar 4, 2002Apr 20, 2004Uniroyal Chemical Company, Inc.High friction polyurethane elastomers having improved abrasion resistance
US6755402 *Feb 8, 2001Jun 29, 2004Lockheed Martin CorporationIsorail elastomer isolator
US6857166 *Nov 12, 2002Feb 22, 2005Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd.Cushion
US7044061Sep 24, 2004May 16, 2006Miner Enterprises, Inc.Railroad car energy absorption apparatus
US7228949 *Jan 27, 2004Jun 12, 2007Tok Bearing Co., Ltd.Linear damper
US20020105121 *Feb 8, 2001Aug 8, 2002Monson Robert JamesStacked tetrahedral elastomer mount
US20070234527May 16, 2007Oct 11, 2007Tetsuya AoyamaCushioning clip
USRE30461Aug 2, 1977Dec 30, 1980E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyResilient center bearing assembly
DE4136598A1Nov 7, 1991May 13, 1993Continental AgRubber metal buffer element for insulating attachments - allows screwless fixing of items using blind rivet and rivet hole
WO2001023773A1Sep 21, 2000Apr 5, 2001Palinkas Richard LNon-linear spring responsive support member
WO2006057150A1Nov 7, 2005Jun 1, 2006Daiwa Kasei Kogyo KkShock-absorbing clip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US9085212Mar 7, 2014Jul 21, 2015Hendrickson Usa, L.L.C.Vehicle suspension
Classifications
U.S. Classification267/292, 105/199.1, 105/199.4, 267/141, 105/199.2, 105/199.3, 267/152, 248/560, 267/153
International ClassificationF16F1/36
Cooperative ClassificationF16F1/373, F16F1/54
European ClassificationF16F1/373, F16F1/54
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 13, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: CHEMTURA CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PALINKAS, RICHARD;REEL/FRAME:018510/0727
Effective date: 20061020
Mar 25, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: SIRF TECHNOLOGY HOLDINGS, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CENTRALITY COMMUNICATIONS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:020697/0367
Effective date: 20070807
Feb 22, 2010ASAssignment
Owner name: CITIBANK, N.A.,DELAWARE
Free format text: AMENDED AND RESTATED INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:CHEMTURA CORPORATION;A & M CLEANING PRODUCTS, LLC;AQUA CLEAR INDUSTRIES, LLC;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:023998/0001
Effective date: 20100212
Owner name: CITIBANK, N.A., DELAWARE
Free format text: AMENDED AND RESTATED INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:CHEMTURA CORPORATION;A & M CLEANING PRODUCTS, LLC;AQUA CLEAR INDUSTRIES, LLC;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:023998/0001
Effective date: 20100212
Mar 21, 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: CROMPTON HOLDING CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: ISCI, INC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: WEBER CITY ROAD LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: BIOLAB TEXTILES ADDITIVES, LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: CHEMTURA CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: AQUA CLEAR INDUSTRIES, LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: RECREATIONAL WATER PRODUCTS, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: ASEPSIS, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: GT SEED TREATMENT, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: GLCC LAUREL, LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: CNK CHEMICAL REALTY CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: GREAT LAKES CHEMICAL GLOBAL, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: WRL OF INDIANA, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: BIOLAB COMPANY STORE, LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: A & M CLEANING PRODUCTS, LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: GREAT LAKES CHEMICAL CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: ASCK, INC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: BIOLAB, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: BIOLAB FRANCHISE COMPANY, LLC, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: UNIROYAL CHEMICAL COMPANY LIMITED (DELAWARE), CONN
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: CROMPTON COLORS INCORPORATED, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: MONOCHEM, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: CROMPTON MONOCHEM, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: FIRST LIEN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:CHEMTURA CORPORATION;BIOLAB FRANCHISECOMPANY, LLC;BIO-LAB, INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:026028/0622
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: KEM MANUFACTURING CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: NAUGATUCK TREATMENT COMPANY, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: HOMECARE LABS, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: LAUREL INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY RELEASE AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:CITIBANK, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:026039/0142
Effective date: 20101110
Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA, N. A., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: SECDOND LIEN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:CHEMTURA CORPORATION;BIOLAB FRANCHISE COMPANY, LLC;BIO-LAB, INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:027881/0347
Effective date: 20101110
Jul 18, 2014ASAssignment
Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: AMENDED AND RESTATED SECOND LIEN INTELLECTUAL PROPERY SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:CHEMTURA CORPORATION;CROMPTON COLORS INCORPORATED;GLCC LAUREL, LLC;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:033360/0225
Effective date: 20140131
Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: THIRD LIEN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:CHEMTURA CORPORATION;CROMPTON COLORS INCORPORATED;GLCC LAUREL, LLC;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:033360/0325
Effective date: 20140131
Apr 24, 2015FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4