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Publication numberUS809531 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 9, 1906
Filing dateMay 3, 1904
Priority dateMay 3, 1904
Publication numberUS 809531 A, US 809531A, US-A-809531, US809531 A, US809531A
InventorsErnest G H Schenck
Original AssigneeErnest G H Schenck
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diamond.
US 809531 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No- 809,531. PATBNTED JAN. 9, 1906. E. G. H. $CHENCK.

DIAMOND. APPLIUATIOR FILED MAY 3, 1904. V 1' WITNESSE8: INVENTOR rnest'GJf 8012 en ck.

I ATTORNEY UNITED STATES PATEnT OFFICE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Jan. 9, 1906.

Application filed May 3, 1904. Serial No. 206,200-

To all whom it may concern.-

Beit known that I, ERNEST G. H. SOHENOK, a subject of the King of Belgium, residing at Orange, New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Diamonds, of which the following is a clear, full, and exact description.

My invention relates to an improvement in the cutting of diamonds; and my obj ect-is to improve the cutting of the same, which will lessen the liability of chipping and which will increase the ease of polishing or repolishing the stone. My cutting may also add to the brilliancy of the stone.

My invention will be defined in the claims.

In the drawings, which show one embodiment of my invention, Figure '1 shows a side elevation of diamond having my improved cutting thereon and on top and bottom provided with the well-known brilliant cutting, all of the facets of which are fiat. Fig. 2 is a top plan view.

In cutting diamonds it is important in order to attain great brilliancy that all parts of the stone should be polished, as any part left unpolished detracts from the brilliancy. It has sometimes been the practice to make the bases of the facets lying adjacent to the girdle meet in a line or edge at the girdle, and conse uently such stone in plain view has been ounded not by a complete circle, but by a series of short straight lines. This is objectionable for one reason, because it re sults in the adjacent facets on top and bottom of the stone meeting in a sharp edge, which is extremely liable to, and usually does, chip during the ordinary wear of the stone, thus detracting somewhat from its brilliancy. With such a construction also the girdle of the stone is bounded by a series of straight lines or edges, which is not so desirable a construction in point of brilliancy as a circular irdle. A stone having a circular polished girle is a particular advantage because all points of the girdle are therefore symmetrical with relation to the axis of the stone, and as its girdle is polished the brilliancy of the stone is increased over what it would be if such girdle were left unpolished and also over what it would be if the girdle were not circular. Furthermore, if any rough or unpolished ortions should be left at the girdle they won d somewhat detract from the brilliancy of the stone.

By my invention I can avoid tea great extent the liability of chipping by forming on the stone' a curved and polished facet, which meets adjacent facets in obtuse angles, and

if the facet is fiat and lies in a curved plane the ease of polishing or repolishing the facet is greatly increased. This is particularly so where the facet lies in a circular plane, such as the exterior of a cylinder or a frustum of a cone. A stone having a polished circulargirdle facet is particularly advantageous in 6 5 the setting of the stone, as the setters tool, if such a circulargirdle facet were left unpolished, would be extremely liable to catch on the stone and chip the same. This is a great disadvantage in setting a stone with an unpolished girdle-facet; but in the form of my stone, which has a circular polished girdle facet, this liability of chipping is avoided, as the setters tool cannot catch on the facet, as the same is polished, and therefore smooth. This is a distinct advantage which will beappreciated by diamond-setters.

Referring to the drawings, 1 is a curved and polished facet, which in the embodiment shown runs entirely around the stone at its girdle and lies in a .curved planein this instance a circular planewhose axis is substantially coincident with the axis x a: of the stone. The stone at at least one side of the facet 1 maybe provided with a lurality of 8 5 flat facets, which cut this girdle-facet in curved edges, as shown, and preferably both sidesthat is, both top and bottomare cut with such flat facets, and I preferably cut a continuous series of these flat facets entirely 9 around the stone, as shown at 2 6 7 8, &c. This curved facet 1 is preferably so cut that it forms obtuse angles, as illustrated by the lines 4 5, with the adjacent facets in order to avoid sharp edges and consequent liability of chip ing. In the embodiment illustrated a each of the facets on top and bottom of the 7 stone is flat, and the facet 1 meets every adj acent facet in an obtuse angle, as shown.

A diamond rovided with a flat facet. exr0 tending entire y around the stone and lying in a circular plane is of particular advantage -in the polishing of the stone. It very often happens that small spots or other flaws occur in a diamond close to the girdle, and in diamonds as out before my invention the polisher might not be able to discover these flaws until his stone was entirely polished, when it would be too late toiremove these defects without changing the proportion of the 1 10 stone and losing much of the material thereof. By my construction, however, such imwithout flaws at this point.

perfections are readily discovered, and even in a diamond completely out and polished such a circular facet running entirely around the stone makes it very easy to determine as to whether or not the diamond is entirely This is an important advantage, as in a diamond the polishing must take place across the grain of the stone, and this grain runs in different directions at different points in the stone. I desire to limit myself to a diamond in distinction to any other stone, as a diamond has qualities inherent in it which are peculiar to it alone.

It will be obvious that the cutting of the facets on top and bottom of the stone need not be of the form or arrangement shown in the drawings, as it will be obvious that other cuttings on top and bottom may be provided without departing from the scope of my invention as claimed. i What I claim is- 1. A diamond having a curved and polished facet running at least part way about thegirdle, andprovided onits top and bottom with flat polished facets which meet said girdle-facet in curved edges.

2. A diamond having a curved and polished facet running entirely around the same at its girdle and provided at at least one side thereof with flat, polished facets which meet said girdlefacet in curved edges and at obtuse angles.

3. A diamond having a flat polished facet lying in a curved plane and running at least part way around said stone, and provided at at least one side thereof with fiat polished facets which meet said facet in: curved edges and at obtuse angles.

4. A diamond having a flat, polished facet lying in a circular plane substantially concentric with the axis of the said stone and running entirely around its girdle, and provided on its top and bottom with flat, polished facets which 'meet said girdle-facet in curved edges and at obtuse angles.

5. A diamond having a flat, polished facet lying in a circular plane running entirely around the same, said stone at at least one side of said facet being provided with a plurality of flat and polished facets each of which meets said circular facet in a curved edge and at an obtuse angle.

6. A diamond having a flat, polished facet lying in a circular plane running entirely around the same at its girdle and whose axis is substantially coincident with the axis of said stone, said stone being provided on both top and bottom thereof with a continuous series of flat and polished facets entirely surrounding said girdle-facet, each of which facets meets said girdle-facet in a curved edge and at an obtuse an le.

Signed at New ork, N. Y., this 2d day of May, 1904.

ERNEST G. H. SCHENCK.

Witnesses:

EMERSON R. NEWELL, BEATRICE MIRVIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3585764 *Jun 10, 1969Jun 22, 1971Huisman HarryDiamond cutting method
US5072549 *Sep 5, 1989Dec 17, 1991Harold JohnstonMethod of cutting gemstones and product
US6578380Jan 24, 2002Jun 17, 2003DiacoHexagonal brilliant cut diamond
US6990833 *Sep 23, 2002Jan 31, 2006Smith Allen LFaceted circular cut diamond
US7225641 *Jan 23, 2003Jun 5, 2007Hohoemi Brains, Inc.Cut design of diamonds providing plenty of visual-perceptible reflection for ornamental use and observation method thereof
US8844319 *Jan 14, 2011Sep 30, 2014Jonathan WEINGARTENCut gemstone providing a specific optical pattern
US9226554May 12, 2014Jan 5, 2016Yoshihiko KodamaCircular cut diamond
US20030154741 *Jan 23, 2003Aug 21, 2003Yoshinori KawabuchiCut design of diamonds providing plenty of visual-perceptible reflection for ornamental use and observation method thereof
US20110000259 *Jan 22, 2008Jan 6, 2011Strnad Iii Leonard JGemstone and method for cutting the same
US20120180525 *Jan 14, 2011Jul 19, 2012Weingarten JonathanRound gemstone cut shape providing a specific optical pattern
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA44C17/001