Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS810347 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1906
Filing dateMar 16, 1905
Priority dateMar 16, 1905
Publication numberUS 810347 A, US 810347A, US-A-810347, US810347 A, US810347A
InventorsEdwin F Porter, Walter R Whiting
Original AssigneeAmerican Rotary Engine Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas-engine.
US 810347 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED JAN. 16, 1906. E. P. PORTER & W. R. WHITING.

GAS ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED M,AR.16, 1905.

xx w wv UNITED STATES PATENT oEEIoE.

EDWIN F. PORTER AND WALTER R. WHITING, OF BOSTON, MASSACHU- SETTS, ASSIGNORS TO AMERICAN ROTARY- ENGINE COMPANY, OF BOSTON, MASSAOHUSETTS,'A CORPORATION OF MAINE.

GAS-ENGINE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Jan. 16, 1906.

To all whom, it may concern:

Be it known that we, EDWIN F. PORTER and WALTER R. WHITING, of Boston, in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Gas-Engines, of which the folowing is a specification.

This invention has relation to gas-engines, so called, of the type illustrated in the copending application of Porter and Whiting, Serial No. 37,615, filed November 24, 1901. In the engine set forth in said application the piston is connected to two oppositely-rotating crank-shafts by separate pitmen, provision being made for gearing the said crank-shafts together to insure their synchronous rotation in opposite directions. In the construction of such engines it has been found that there is a tendency of the itmen to twist the piston and cause it to bind in the c linder. This is sometimes due to the play etween the gears which connect the crank-shafts, to the wearing away of the crank-pins or pitmen, or to inequalities in the length of the two pitmen. According to this present invention, how ever, we provide a loose connection between the block to which the pitmen are pivoted and the piston to compensate for inequalities in the length of the pitmen and to prevent the piston from binding in the cylinder.

On the drawings, Figure 1 represents, partially in section, a gas-engine equipped with our improvements. Fig. 2 shows In detail the loose connection between the pitmanblock and the piston." Fig. 3 represents a somewhat different embodiment of the invention.

On the drawings the cylinder is indicated at a and the piston at b.

The two crank-shafts are indicated at c c, and they are geared together by suitable ears d d. As set forth in the application ereinbefore referred to, the two crank-shafts are provided with momentumewheels, the two wheels, h0wever,'bein mounted u on theopposite ends of the sha ts to which t ey are attached.

e 0 indicate pitmen, which are preferably of the same length and which are straight, as shown. Each pitman is pivoted upon a stud j; passed through the ears g of a pitmanblock 9 The two studs ff are parallel, as

shown in Fig. 1. The pitman-block is pivotall connected to the cylinder by a intle' g. he pistonis preferablyhollow, as s own,

and the pitman-block is located therein, be-

- ing adapted to slide to a limited extent longitudinally u on the pintle g, upon which it 1s pivoted. he extent to which the pitmanblock is adapted to move, however, is limited by annular flan es 1) -formed on the interior or walls of the piston.

By virtue of this construction there is a universal movement between the pitman and the piston, and consequently there is no possibility of twisting or forcing the piston out of true with the interior walls of thecylinder or causing it to bind or become cramped therein.

It is evident that in lieu of the particular arrangement shown in Figs. 1 and 2 the construction shown in Fig. 3 may be employed, in which the pintle h, which corresponds to that at g, may be located in parallelism with the studs f f of the pintle-block.

It is'desirable to employ the two so arate studs f f in connection with the straig t pitmen 0 rather than to connect the two pitmen with the pitman-block by a sin le stud, for in that event the. pitmen woul have to be offset andunder the strains experienced in an engine of this character would be liable to become bent or broken'or at least to yield under the strain.

Having thus explained, the nature of the invention and described a way of constructing and using the same, althou h without attempting to set forth all of the orms In which it may be made or all of the modes of its use, we declare that what we claim is- 1. In combination with a cylinder, a iston, two oppositely-rotating crank-shafts, and two pitmen connected to said crankshafts, of means interposed between said itmen and piston for loosely connecting the ormer to t e latter to provide lost motion between the said parts.

2. The combination with a cylinder, a piston, two oppositely-rotating crank-shafts, a pitman connected to each crank-shaft, a pitman-block having separate studs or pivots for the pitman, and means for loosely connectin said pitman-block to said piston.

3. file combination with a cylinder, a piston, oppositely-rotating crank-shafts, a sep- 'arate pitman for each crank-shaft, a pitmanblock having se arate studs or pivots for each pitman, an a pintle loosely connecting said pitman-block with said piston.

4. The combination with a cylinder; a piston, oppositely-rotating crank-shafts, pitmen connecting said crank-shafts to a member which is loosely mounted on and adapted to chan e its relative position with said piston.

.5. he combination with a cylinder, a piston, oppositely-rotating crank-shafts, pitmen connecting said crank-shafts to a member which is loosely mounted on and adapted to change its relative position with said piston and accommodate itself to any unequal nio- 5 tion of said pitmen.

In testimony whereof we have afliXed our signatures in presence of two witnesses.

EDWIN F. PORTER. WALTER R. WHITI NG.

Witnesses:

M. B. MAY, C. C. STEGHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2417910 *Jun 20, 1942Mar 25, 1947Bruegger Robert DInternal-combustion engine
US6543225Jul 20, 2001Apr 8, 2003Scuderi Group LlcSplit four stroke cycle internal combustion engine
US6609371May 7, 2002Aug 26, 2003Scuderi Group LlcSplit four stroke engine
US6722127Oct 31, 2002Apr 20, 2004Carmelo J. ScuderiSplit four stroke engine
US6880502Jul 8, 2003Apr 19, 2005Carmelo J. ScuderiSplit four stroke engine
US6952923Jun 9, 2004Oct 11, 2005Branyon David PSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US6986329Jul 20, 2004Jan 17, 2006Scuderi Salvatore CSplit-cycle engine with dwell piston motion
US7017536Mar 2, 2005Mar 28, 2006Scuderi Carmelo JSplit four stroke engine
US7121236Sep 6, 2005Oct 17, 2006Scuderi Salvatore CSplit-cycle engine with dwell piston motion
US7588001Aug 4, 2005Sep 15, 2009Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US7628126Mar 21, 2006Dec 8, 2009Scuderi Group, LlcSplit four stroke engine
US7810459Feb 5, 2009Oct 12, 2010Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US7954461Sep 12, 2008Jun 7, 2011Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US7954463Jul 15, 2009Jun 7, 2011Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US8006656Apr 18, 2009Aug 30, 2011Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US8826800Feb 17, 2011Sep 9, 2014Michael IndenReciprocating piston mechanism with extended piston offset
US8839687May 22, 2012Sep 23, 2014Michael IndenReciprocating piston mechanism with extended piston offset
US20040050046 *Jul 8, 2003Mar 18, 2004Scuderi Carmelo J.Split four stroke engine
US20040255882 *Jun 9, 2004Dec 23, 2004Branyon David P.Split-cycle four-stroke engine
US20050016475 *Jul 20, 2004Jan 27, 2005Scuderi Salvatore C.Split-cycle engine with dwell piston motion
US20050139178 *Mar 2, 2005Jun 30, 2005Scuderi Group, LlcSplit four stroke engine
US20050268609 *Aug 4, 2005Dec 8, 2005Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US20060011154 *Sep 6, 2005Jan 19, 2006Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-cycle engine with dwell piston motion
US20060168957 *Mar 21, 2006Aug 3, 2006Scuderi Group, LlcSplit four stroke engine
US20070272221 *Aug 6, 2007Nov 29, 2007Branyon David PSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US20090150060 *Feb 5, 2009Jun 11, 2009Branyon David PSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US20090199829 *Apr 18, 2009Aug 13, 2009Branyon David PSplit-Cycle Four-Stroke Engine
US20090229587 *Sep 12, 2008Sep 17, 2009Branyon David PSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US20090241926 *Jun 10, 2009Oct 1, 2009Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-cycle four-stroke engine
US20090241927 *Jun 10, 2009Oct 1, 2009Scuderi Group, LlcSplit-Cycle Four-Stroke Engine
US20090250046 *Jun 16, 2009Oct 8, 2009Scuderi Carmelo JSplit four stroke engine
US20090272368 *Jul 15, 2009Nov 5, 2009Branyon David PSplit-Cycle Four-Stroke Engine
US20090283061 *Jul 8, 2009Nov 19, 2009Branyon David PSplit-Cycle Four-Stroke Engine
US20110153215 *Dec 8, 2010Jun 23, 2011Electronics and Telecommunications Research Insti tuteApparatus and method of providing facility information
Classifications
International ClassificationF02B75/06
Cooperative ClassificationF02B75/065, F02B2720/00
European ClassificationF02B75/06C