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Publication numberUS810603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1906
Filing dateJul 20, 1904
Priority dateJul 20, 1904
Publication numberUS 810603 A, US 810603A, US-A-810603, US810603 A, US810603A
InventorsWilliam E Badger
Original AssigneeWilliam E Badger
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic tool.
US 810603 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED 010023,'1900.

- 10.0. M0000. PNEUMATIG 2000 APPLOTION FILED JULY 20v. 1904.'

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UNITED STATES PATENT oEEioE.

` wiLLiAM E. BADGER, or comer, MASSACHUSETTS PNEUMATIC TOOL.

Specification of Letters ljatent.

Patented'JanQ 23,' 1 906.

- Application ned my 20,1904. Seial No. 217.364.

T0 all wit/nn, it may concern:

viding the tool with a grasping-handle having an air-passage adapted to be connected with the compressed-air supply and movabl r mounted in the cylinder-head, through which there is a passage to the valve-chamber, the handle being' movable to bring the air-passage therein into registration with the airpassage in the head.

Another feature of the invention consists in making the grasping-handle.rotatable with relation to the cylinder and head, as well as movable longitudinally witli relation thereto. The turning handle' is fastened securely to the cylinder and to the forward head, the latter engaginr the-non-eircular shank of the workin tool, which is in practically fixed relation t erewith when the tool is in operation. There are no working parts with sliding joints or working fits exposed to the dust and grit raised by the workin tool, as is the case where the working too is rotatable with relation to the body of the tool. The forward head is provided with a bushing having aperforation the cross-section of which corresponds with thecross-section of the standard drill-steel from which the working' tools are i made, so that the latter do not require'any special itting, asis t-he case when the Shanks of the Working tools must be of circular crosssection to turn in the tool-holding socket, and the latter is in a lixed position with'relation to the grasping-handle for holding the tool to the work,

Other features of the invention will be set forth hereinafter,

The invention will now be fully described, and the novel features thereof will be particularly set forth .in the claims at the close of the specilication.

1n the drawings, Figure 1 is a longitudina centralsection of a pneumatic tool embodying the invention, taken when the piston is in the position it will' occupy when a worlvtool is inserted. Fi'g. 2 is a longitudinal section" on line 2 2 of Fig. 3, taken at right angles to .as shown in Fifr. 1. 'Ln the handle extending longitudinall Fig. 1, but the piston bein in the position it wi l occupy when the wor r-tool is removed. Fig. 3 is a cross-section through the valve# casing on line 3 3 ol' F ig'. 1.`r Fig. 4 isa crosssection taken on line 4 4 of Fig. 1, showing the upper set of grooves in the piston. Fig.

5 is a cross-section on line 4 4 of Fig. 1, taken whenthe piston is at the upper or backward end of its stroke, and therefore passimr through the lower set of grooves instead oi, through the upper set. Fig. 6 is a plan of the top of the valve-casing. Fig. 7 is an end view of the lower head. Fig. 8 is a cross-section on vline 8 8 of Fig. 1.

The tool comprises a cylinder B, an outer casing B', a piston (or hammer) C, which moves in Said cylinder, a valve-casing D in the upper or rear end of the cylinder and formed with a chamber E, a valve F, located and moving in said chamber E, an u per head G for the cylinder, a grasping-hand e H,

Aconnected with the upper head and having a passage connecting with the source of fluid-v pressure which-operates the tool, a lower head I, which receives the drill or working tool,

iand a turning handle J, secured to the lower head for the purpose of rotating the working tool. The graspin --handle H 1s mounted in the head G in sue ymanner as to be Inov- "ableboth longitudinally and rotatably. The stem of the handle is formed with a neck 5, thus forming a chamber 1, within ywhich is inserted .a segment of collar 6. A screw 7 passes through the side of head G and into the segment-collar 6, thus securing the grasping-handle to the head, but allowing a longitudinal movement of the handle as ermitted bythe length of the chamber and a so a turning movement of the handle with relation to the head. The shoulder at each'end of the chamber limits the lon itudinal movement and preven tscntire withdrawal of the handle. The collar 6 forms a bearin0r for the ortion of the screw 7 which enters the cham er. The

grasping-handle H is preferably formed with an annular flange 67, thus forming an annularlfr'ooved. bearing for the annular rear end of t 1e head G. A recess 8 is formed in the lower part of the stem, and a 'spring 9, seated in said recess and bearing a Tainst the head G, normally retains the hand e H in its uppermost position with relation to the head, A hole 10 isv formed through the cross-arm anda branch exten IOO of the handle opposite to the compressed-air connection and extends inward past the junction of the passage in the stem `with the passage in the arm, whereby the amount oi air admitted to the tool may be regulated.I A

y head 62 serves as a means for operatingthe regulating-stem. A series of' holesll are formed through the wall of the neck 5 in the lower part of the stem of handle, through which the compressed air will pass into the chamber 1 when the air is admitted to the handle. A passage 12 leads from the inside of the socket I.in the head G, in which the gras ing-handleidi moves, and extends down insi e of' the ,side wall of the head and through. the ,lower end and registers with a channel 13, cut in the top of the valve-casing. The entrance to the passage 12 is normally closed by the base 2 of the handle, as shown in Fig. 1. When the gras ing-handle H is ushed down, the base 2 wi l be moved down elow the entrance to the passage 12, thus leaving a free passage for the compressed air from the socket 10 in the handle through the holes 11, chamber 1, and passage 12 to the channel 13 in thetop of the valve-casing. The valve F is a double spool formed with heads 18 and 22 at opposite ends, a central annular flange or partition 20, and neck portions 19 and 21 between the said central ilange and the two heads, thus forming two chambers within the valve. Channel 13 extends along the u er part of the valve-casing to a port 14, w nch opens into the valve-chamber E.

A channel'63 (shown in Fig. '6) and at right angles to channel 13- is cut on the top of the valve-casing from port 14, Fig. 1, to connect with, ahole 15, (see Fig. 3,) which extends down through the l.valve-casing and registers with a passage 16,'Fiff. 2, extending down in the wall of the cy inder B and leading through hole 17 into the interior of the piston-chamber of the cylinder at some distance below the enlar ed portion oi the piston-- chamber in wliic the head 26 of the piston moves, Figs 2 and 4. When the valve is in the position shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the port 14 also opens into the vallve-cha1nber around the neck 21 of the valve between the head 22 -and the partition 20. A port 23 leads from said chamber through the side of the valvecasing, and a channel 23 leads from said port 23 down in the outside of the lvalveicasing and registers with a passage 24, which extends .down in the wall of the cylinder B and opens into the piston-chamber through holes 25. (See Figs. 1 and 2.) When the"l piston is in its lowest workincr position with a Izool inserted, the piston-thead 26 is above the ports 25, and in its reciprocating movements it does not go below the ports` 25 as long as there is a tool in the lower head. When the piston is in this position, the admission of compressed air through the ports 25 tends to move the piston upward, the air on the upper side exhausting through port 27 from the piston-chamber into the .chamber of .the valve-casing which surrounds the neck 19 and thence through the port 28and through the side of the head G and through a passage 64 in a clamp 65, to which a pipe may be connected, if desired. (See Fig. 3.) The clamp 65 serves to bind the head G to the valvecasing D and to the cylinder-casing B more securely than it could be held by the threads alone. Passages 29 and 30 lead out of the bottom of the valve-chamber at opposite lends beyond the limit of movement of the valve and register7 respectively, with passages 31 and 32, which extend down in the cylinder-walls and open into the pistonchamber through holes 33 and 34 `at some distance below the enlarged portion of the piston-chamber in which the piston-headv26 moves and preferabl on the same circumferential line as the ho e 17 through which the passage 16 opens. l

The stem 35 of the piston C serves also as a valve to open and close the air-passages, as will be described. The chamber ofthe cylinder B is made o -f reduced "interior diameter below the portion in which the piston-head moves, the stem 35 ol" the piston having a sliding iit therein, as does the head 26 of the piston in the enlarged portion. Cut in the circumferential stem 35 there are four sets of H-sha-ped grooves, theone-marked 36 37 38 connecting the opening 17 from passage 16 in the wall of the cylinder with the opening 34 Jfrom passage 32 in the wall of the cylinder when the` piston is in the position shown in Fig. 1. At the same time the groove 39 40 41 connects'the opening`33 from passage 31 with an exhaust-port .48 through the wall of IOS the cylinder, the groove 36 37 38 being on the same level as the groove 39 40 41, but on the opposite half of the piston. The groove 42 43 44 and the groove 45 46 47 are on the same level with each other at some distance below the groove 36 37 38 and the groove 39 40 41, above described, but on different quar ters from said first-described pair of grooves and preferably of greater len th in order to be certain of reversing the va ve and admitting air to the back of the piston for the purpose to be hereinafter described. The lower sets of grooves are located at a distance below the upper sets nearly e ual to the length ot stroke of the piston, so t at as the piston ap roaches the end of its upstroke the chanvne Llregisters with hole 17 and makes conl to one end of the valve. before opening the exhaust from the other end, or vice versa, this can be accomplished by making one of said grooves of difierent length from its companiongroove. B having the necks of the grooves on one .en of the piston simultaneously admit and exhaust pressure to opposite circumferential line.

ends ofthe valve itis'possible to Ahave the `ports to dthe pistonlchamber all in the same Hence the isto'n covers these ports in its oppositestro e until the grooves in the other end register, and it folows that I 'obtain the maximum travel for a given length of piston. .The H-shaped grooves at the forward end of the piston I. -make a little lon er than those at the back in order to be certain of reversing the valve and admitting ailuto the back of the piston to check the backward impetus and revent the piston striking the head and to rive it forward. The recoil on the forward stroke aids to reverse thedirection', and short grooves yonly are needed. I have located the admission-poit-at the extreme end of the back chambenA It would be possible to lace this 'port a short distance from the en( so that th'e piston would cover it on the return stroke, and thus give a com ression-space to prevent the piston'striking t e back head and serving for a cushion-recoil, and thus a shorter forward neck would be used. For the type I l have shown I prefer the arrangement indicated and can cut the H-grooves up at will, depending upon the air-pressure used sufliciently to prevent the piston from striking the head. In thelower part of the cylinder there is a vent 60, 4extending from the pistonchambery through the wall to the outside air to exhaust when the piston descends. The lower or hammer end 61 of the iston is referably reduced in diameter. T e lower is bored to receive a disk bushing 51 with a round hole, through which the cylindrical lower or hammer end of the piston passes to strike the work-tool; A bushing 53 with square hole butts up against the bushing 51 to receive the square shank of the work-tool, so

that theshank of the work-tool also' in part butts up against the disk bushing 51. A Hush key 54 is inserted in the joint of the c 'linder 'B and head I to prevent the .hea I from working loose. A split clamp-handle J holds the key in 1kplace and also serves as a handle with whic to turn the tool while in use. A keyway 49 is cut in the 'piston-stem,

in which a removable key 50,en ages to pre-.- vent thev `ist011 from turning/anf'to keep the H-shape grooves inproperrgistration. The key vpasses through a hole inthe cylindercad I.

Wall and is retained therein by a pin 66,which is removable, so that the key '50 can beremoved. v

The operation is as follows: Before the work-tool is inserted the piston will be down in the lower part of the cylinder, as shownin Fig. 2. If the compressed air is turned onbefore a work-tool is inserted, the piston-head 26 being below the compressed-air inlets 25 the compressed air will have a tendency to hold the piston down, as shown in Fig. 2. When a'work-tool is inserted, it pushes 'up the piston into the position shown in Fig. 1, y

with the piston-head above the compressedair inlets 25. If now the grasping-handle is pushed down to open communication between' the passage 10 inv the handle and the passage 12 in the head through the holes 11 and chamber 1, the compressed air will ass through channel 13, port 14, into the va vechamber between the partition 20 and head 22, thence through port23 into passage 24, down inside of the wall of the cylinder, and

4through holes25 into the piston-chamber beneath the head ,26 of the piston. The compressed air thus admitted drives the piston up, theair on the upper sidef exhausting 'through port 27 in the bottom of the valveeasing into the chamber between partition 20 and head 18 and out through port 28,

which extends out through the sideof the c ylluder-head G. When the compressed air is. turned on and passes down into the pistonchamber through holes 25, it also at the same time passes through channel l14., passage l5 and 16 and hole l17, and groove 36 37 38, passages 34, 32, and 3() into the right-hand end of the valve-chamber, tending to hold the valve in its left-hand position, as in l ig. 1. When the piston moves up, the entrance of live air from passage 17 to 34 is shut ofi. When the piston approaches the end of its upward stroke, the channel 45'rcg'isters with hole 17 and groove 47 registers with hole 33. Live or compressed air is conducted through groove 45 46 47 to passage 33, thence through passages 31v and 29 into the left-hand end ol' the valve-casing, thus putting pressure on the left-hand end of the valve and tending to drive the valve to the right., At the same time the groove 42 registers with 34, and air from the right-hand end of the valve is carried down through passages 30, 32, and 34, through groove 42 43 44, and out through exhaust-port 46', so that the valve can, move to Ioo the right-under the pressure already described.

When the Valve moves to the right, t'he valvehead 18 closes the exhaust-port 428 and the movement lof the head 22 opens exhaust-port Partition 2() passes to the right of port 14, sothat tlie live air is now admitted to the valve-chamber around neck 19 between the partition 20 and head 18, thence through port 2'7 into thel cylinderon top of the piston, V

p driving the piston down. The air on theunder side of the piston-head 26 exhausts through holes 25, channel 24, channel 23, and exhaust-port 68. When the piston approaches the lower end of its downstrolie, channel-groove 36 will register with live-air passage 17, and live air passes through neck 37, groove`38, passages 34, 32, and 30, and puts'pressure to the right-handend o 'the valve. Channel 39 registers with passage 33, and channel 41 registers with exhaust-port 48, so that when the valve is driven to the left the air will exhaust through 29, 31, 33,39, 40 41, and 48. Y lt is obvious that -other kind of Huid-pressure than compressed air may be used.

I claim as myvinventionl. In a pneumatic impact-melma cylinder andy iston, avalve-casing having a 'valve therein for controlling the movements oi' the piston, a head secured to said cylinder and eld in iixed relation Ithereto and to lsaid valve-casing, a handle or upport upon which Said head is rotatably ino inted and means to rotate said cylinder. ,il i

2. In a pneumatic iin act-tool, a cylinder and piston, a valve-casing having a valve therein for controlling the movements of the piston, Aa head secured to said cylinder and eld in fixed relation thereto and to said valve-casing, a handle or support upon which said head is rotatably mounted and longitudinally movable with relation. thereto and ,means to rotate said cylinder. y

3. In a pneumatic impact-tool, a cylinder and piston, a valve-casing having a valve therein for controlling the movements of the piston, a head secured to said cylinder and eld in Xed relation thereto and to said valve-casing, a handle or support upon which. said head is rotatably mounted, a passage in' said handle which may be connected with a source of huid-pressure supply, means to control the admission ol fluid to saidvalve-casing, and means to rotate said cylinder.

4. In a pneumatic impact-tool, a cylinder and piston, a valve-casing having a valve therein ior controlling the movements ot the piston, a head secured t-o said cylinder and held in fixed relation thereto and vto said valve-casing, a handle or support upon which said head is rotatably mounted, said head having a passage for motive iiuid which is alternately placed in communication with op- 4posite ends of the cylinder, a passage in-saidv andle which may be connected with a source of {luid-pressure supply and is adapted to be placed in communication with said passage in thehead, and means to rotate said cylinder w'i li relation t o said handle and source of Huid-pressure supply.

5. A'pneumatic nnpact-tool, having a cyll inder provided with a head, a' grasping-liandle having a projecting stem longitudinally movably mounted inthe head, said head having a passage communicating with the inply,

siaeos terior of the cylinder and a passage through said handle and stem which may be connectwith relation to said grasping-handle and source of {luid-pressure supply.

- 6. pneumatic impact-tool having a cylinder provided with4 a head adapted to receive the stem of a grasping-handle, and having a passage communicating with the interior of the cylinder, a grasping-handle'havng a stem longitudinally movably mounted in said head, a passage therein which mayY be connected with a source of Huid-pressure supsaid passage leading to an outlet in the stein which is adapted to communicate with the passage in the head, means whereby the cylinder may be rotated with relation to said grasping-handle, and means whereby the motive iluid will be supplied to the cylinder through said passages when the handle is in its forward position and the cylinder is rotated with relation tosaid grasping-handle and source ofluid-pressure supply.

7. A pneumatic iiiipact-tool having a cylinder provided with ahead adapted to receive the stem" of a grasping-handle, and having a passage communicating with the interior ol the cylinder, a grasping-handle provided with a stem, a passage in said handle and stem which may be connected with a source of Huid-pressure supply, said passage leading to an outlet in the stem, said stem'be- 'iii'g rotatably mounted and longitudinally movable in the head, means whereby the cylinder may be rotated with relation to the graspii'ig-handle, means whereby the motive iiuid may be supplied to the cylinder through said passages when the handle is in its forward position and the cylinder is rotated with relation to the grasping-handle and source of huid-pressure supp y, and means whereby said stein is retained in the head. Y S. A pneumatic impact-tool having a c l- 4inder provided with a head held in xed re ation thereto and having a passagecommunieating with thel interior of the cylinder,` a graspin -handle 'provided with a stem projecting orwardly at an angle thereto and rotatably mounted in the head,`a passage in said handle and stein which may be connected with a source of fluid-pressure supply, said passage leading to an outlet in said stem, means to rotate said cylinder and head, and means whereby said outlet in the stem may be maintained in communication with said IOO IlO

passage in the head when the latter is rotated with relation to said 9. .A pneumatic impact-tool havinga c linder provided with a head held in fixed re ation thereto and having a passage communicatinfy with the interior of the cylinder, a handle having a stem rotatabl mounted in the head and a passage therein or the motive fluid, said -handle having a passage therein which may be connected with a source of fluid-pressure supply, said passage being conu nected with an outlet in said stem, means. to

rotate said cylinder and head, means whereby said outlet in the stem may be brought in ccnzimunication with said passage in the head to furnish a supply of motive fluid 'thereto when the tool is in operation and when the cylinder and head are rotatedwith relation to the grasping-handle. i

10. A pneumatic impact-tool having a cylinder provided with a head adapted to receive the stem of a grasping-handle, and having a passage communicating with the interior of the cylinder, a-handle having a stem its forward position and the cylinder is so rotated. with relation to said handle and source of fluid-pressure supply.

11. A pneumatic impact-tool having a cylinder provided with a head adapted to receive the stem of a grasping-handle, and having a passage communicating with the interior of the cylinder, .a grasping-handle havin a stem longitudinally andf rotatably mount in the head, said handle and stem having a passage Iwhich may be connected with a 'source of Huid-pressure supply and is adapted to communicate with the passage in the head, means whereby the cylinder may be rotated with relation to the grasping-handle, and means whereby the motlve iiuid may be supplied to the cylinder through said passages when the handle is .in its forward position and the cylinder1 is so rotated with relation to said handle and source of fluid-pressure supply.'

12. A pneumatic impact-tool having a cylinder provided with a head adapted to receive the stem of a grasping-handle, and having a passage communicating with the interior of the cylinder, a grasping-handle having a stem longitudinally andV rotatably mounted in the head, means for retaining said stem in the head, said handle and stem having a passage which maybe connected with a ed to communicate with the passage in the he ad, means whereby the cylinder may be rotated with relation to the; gra-spin -handle', and means whereby'the motive iiui may be supplied to vthe cylinder through said passages when the handle is in its forward position and the cylinder is so rotated with relationto said handle and source of fluid-pressure supply.

' 13. A pneumatic impact-tool having a cyl-Pv inder provided lwith a head ada ted to r'eceive the stem of a grasping-hand e, and having a passage communicating with the interior of the cylinder, a'grasping-handle having a stem longitudinally and rotatably mounted in the head, means for retaining said Vstem in the head, said handle and stem having a passage which may be connected with a source of fluid-pressure supply and is adapt-l ed to communicate with the passage in the head, when the handle and stem are in aforvward position, means whereby the cylinder may be rotated with relation to the graspinghandle, and means whereby the motive iuid may be supplied to the cylinder through said passages when the cylinder is so rotated-with relation to said handle and source of Huidpressure supply. y i ,v

14. A piston impact-tool having a cylinder and a grasping-handle provided with a projecting' stem mounted rotatably and lon itudinally to said cylinder, a passage in the andie and stein which may be connected with a source of fluid-pressure supply, means to control the' admission of motive Huid to the interior of the cylinder', a handle secured to the cylinder for rotating the latter, and means whereby the motive fluid may be supplied to the cylinder through said passage when said grasping-handle is in its forward position and the cylinder is rotated with relation to the gasping-handle and source olipressure-supp v in denprovidedwith head, a passage therein communicating with the interior of the cylinder, a grasping-handle provided with a stem longitudinally and rotatably mounted in the head, a passage in the handle and stem which maybe connected with a source of finiti-pressure s'upply and is adapted to communicate with the passage in the head when the handle is in a forward position, a handle secured to the cylinder for rotating the latter, and means whereby the motive fluid may he supplied to the cylinder through said passages when said grasping-handle is in its forward position and the cylinder is rotated with relation vto the grasping-handle and the source of fluid-pressure supply.

16. A pneumatic in'ipact-'tool'having a cylinder provided with a head, a passage therein conununicating with the interior of the cylin- 15. A pneumatic impact-tool having a cylder, a'grasping-handle provided with a stem source of fluld-pressure suppiy-and is adaptl longitudinally and rotatably mounted 1n the 13o head, a passage in the handle and stem which may be connected with a source of fluid-pressure supply and is adapted to communicate w with the passage in the head, said cylinder inder containing a piston,

being provided with a forward head secured thereto and havin(T a socket therein adapted to engage the shanllr of a working-tool, a handle securedrto the cylinder'for rotating the latter and said working tool, and means whereby the motive fluid may be supplied to the cylinder through said passages when the said grasping-handle is in its forward position and the cylinder is rotated with relation to said grasping-handleand source of fluidpressure supply.

17. A pneumatic impact-tool having a cyla valve for controlling the motive lluid within said tool, a valvecasing located within the rear of the pistonchamber, a head and a handle having a pressure-supply passage therethrough leading to the valve-casing, said head being rotatably mounted on said handle, means lor holding said head in a iXed relation to the cylinder,l

and means for rotating said cylinder and head with relation to said handle.

18. An impact-tool having a cylinder prorvided with a head secured in iixed relation thereto, a handle or support on which said head is rotatably mounted, a passage in said handle which may be connected wi th a source of luid-pressure supply, a passage in said head to which the motive luid is supplied hy said passage in the handle -when the tool is in operation, and means to rotate said cylinder and head with relation to said handle.

19. An impact-tool having a cylinder provided With a head secured in fixed relation thereto, a handle or supporton which said head is rotatably mounted, a passage in said handle which may be connected with a source `of Huid-pressure supply, a'passage in said head to which the motive fluid is supplied by said passage in the .handle when the tool is in operation, means to rotate said cylinder with relation to said handle and a forward head to t; o cylinder adapted to engage the shank of' a working tool to rotate the latter.

20. An impact-tool having a cylinder provided with a head secured in -fixed relation thereto, a handle or-support on which said whereby the motive 'lluid will be supplied head is rotatably mounted, a passage in said handle which may be lconnected with a source of lfluid-pressure supply, a passage in said head to wl 'ch the motive luid is supplied by said passage in the handle when the tool is in operation, means to rotate said cylinder and head with relation'to said handle and means through saidpassage in the handle to said Voo passage in the head when the latter is rotated with relation to` said handle.

21. An impact-tool having a cylinder provided with a head secured 1n xed relation thereto, a valve-block having a valve therein 6 5 forzcontrolling the movements of the piston,

a handle or support on which said head is rotatably mounted, a passage in said handle which may be connected with a source of Huid-pressure supply, a passage in said head 7c through which the motive fluid may be supplied Jfrom said passage in the handle to the valve-bloek and `means to rotate said cylinder and head with relation to said handle.

22. An impact-tool having a cylinder pro- 7 5 vided with a head secured in fixed relation thereto, a valve-block having a valve therein for controlling the movements of the piston, a handle or support on which said head is rotatably mounted, a passage in said handle 8o which may be connected with a source of Huid-pressure supply, a passage in said head through which the motive fluid may be supplied Jrom said passage in the handle to `the valve-block, means to rotate said cylinder 8 5 and head, and means vwhereby the motive huid may be supplied through said passage in the handle to said passage in the head when the latter is rotated with relation to said han- (lle. 4 9o 23. An impact-tool having a cylinder pro- I vided yWith'ahead secured in iXed relation thereto, a'handle or support on which said head is rotatably and longitudinally mounted, a passage in said handle which may be .95 connected with a source of fluid-pressure, a passage in said head to which the motive fluid is supplied from said passage in thehandle, when the latter is in its forward position and the cylinder and head are rotatedwith relation to said handle. i

24. A pneumatic impact-tool having a. grasping-handle 'with an air-passage therethrough, a cylinder, a cylinder-head to receive said handle and formed with an air-pas- Ic 5 sage adapted to communicate with an outlet from the passage inthe handle, said handle having a stem which lits into the interior of. the head and having an annular flange which fits outside of said head, thereby 'forming an I 1: annular groovedbearing for the rear end of the head.

ln testimony whereof I aflix my signature in presence of two witnesses. l

NVILLIAM E. BADGER. Witnesses: v

THOMAS SEvrrHIN, Jol-IN H. DINEGAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4409886 *Sep 8, 1980Oct 18, 1983Mosier Industries, Inc.Self-returning cylinder
US7140179Nov 10, 2004Nov 28, 2006Campbell Hausfeld/Scott Fetzer CompanyValve
US7537027Nov 10, 2004May 26, 2009Campbell Hausfeld/Scott Fetzer CompanyValve with duel outlet ports
US8015997Apr 21, 2009Sep 13, 2011Campbell Hausfeld/Scott Fetzer CompanyValve for a pneumatic hand tool
US8430184Aug 5, 2011Apr 30, 2013Campbell Hausfeld/Scott Fetzer CompanyValve for a pneumatic hand tool
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE21B4/14