Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS8137658 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/168,163
Publication dateMar 20, 2012
Filing dateJun 28, 2005
Priority dateJun 28, 2005
Also published asUS20060292091, WO2007001828A1
Publication number11168163, 168163, US 8137658 B2, US 8137658B2, US-B2-8137658, US8137658 B2, US8137658B2
InventorsWilliam E. Prosise
Original AssigneeIsp Investments Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tooth whitening compositions
US 8137658 B2
Abstract
A liquid, substantially anhydrous tooth whitener composition for delivery of a tooth-whitening amount of active whitening ingredient onto teeth, with effective bioadhesion and retention thereof, and, thereupon, sufficient penetration of the ingredient through the tooth enamel, providing efficacious bleaching of stained teeth.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(8)
What is claimed is:
1. A liquid, substantially anhydrous tooth whitener composition for delivery of a tooth-whitening amount of active whitening ingredient onto teeth, with effective bioadhesion and retention thereof, and, thereupon, sufficient penetration of said ingredient through the tooth enamel, providing efficacious bleaching of stained teeth, comprising, by weight,
(a) 10% to 75% of a complex which is (i) a mixture of 78 to 90% of water soluble polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) having K-values of K-12 to K-120 and (ii) 10 to 22% of H2O2; releasing 1 to 20% of active H2O2 from said complex onto a tooth surface;
(b) 0 to 20% of PVP K-60 to K-90, said PVP being present in said composition at a K-value of the PVP in said complex of less than 30, and/or the amount of PVP therein is less than 20%, and
(c) 30 to 90% of anhydrous ethanol, said composition having a Brookfield viscosity measured at 25° C. of 50 to 10,000 cps, an in vitro bioadhesion/retention on hydroxyapatite (HAP) of at least 10% after 5 minutes while immersed in water, and a bleaching efficacy defined by ΔE values in the CIE (L*a*b*) color scale of at least 5.
2. A tooth whitener composition according to claim 1 wherein the PVP in (a) is PVP K-30.
3. A tooth whitener composition according to claim 1 wherein the PVP in (b) is PVP K-90.
4. A tooth whitener composition according to claim 1 wherein the PVP in (a) is K-90.
5. A tooth whitener composition according to claim 1 wherein said amount of in (c) is 65 to 80%.
6. A tooth whitener composition according to claim 1 having a viscosity measured at 25° C. of 75-1500 cps.
7. A tooth whitener composition according to claim 6 having a viscosity measured at 25° C. of 100 to 800 cps.
8. A tooth whitener composition according to claim 1 wherein the amount of said complex comprises: (a) 20 to 60%, and (b) 0.1-10%.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to tooth whitening compositions, and, more particularly, to a liquid, substantially anhydrous tooth whitening composition for effective delivery of a tooth whitening ingredient onto teeth, which exhibits excellent bioadhesion and retention thereon, advantageous penetration through tooth enamel, superior bleaching of stained teeth, and a predetermined Brookfield viscosity which provides for multiple methods of delivery of the tooth whitening ingredient onto teeth.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Since the early 1980s, the tooth whitening industry has grown from a scenario in which one could only receive tooth whitening treatments in a dental office to the scenario that exists today in which numerous competitors sell over-the-counter tooth whitening systems including delivery systems such that the average consumer can whiten their teeth in their own home without medical supervision.

Numerous delivery systems have become popular and well known including those employing strips coated with the tooth whitening substance, trays filled with tooth whitener, tooth whiteners incorporated into toothpaste, and other paint-on applicators such as those analogous to felt tip pens, and others using brushes with bristles and foam-type brush applicators. Over-the-counter whiteners today fall into three categories—trays and gels, strips and paint-on whiteners.

Tray and gel systems are designed for the user to fill the flexible tray with the whitening formulation and this is placed on the teeth. The gel extrudes out of the tray on the gingival and the mucosa with a great chance of soft tissue irritation. Strips are placed on the teeth with a good portion of the strip laying on the gingival area and also causing irritation.

A successful tooth whitening composition requires that the following parameters be favorable:

(1) A sufficient amount of activated active ingredient, e.g. H2O2 present in and delivered by the composition;

(2) an enhanced degree of retention of the composition onto teeth; i.e. its bioadhesion, which is determined by the ratio of its cohesive energy to surface energy;

(3) a favorable degree of penetration of the composition into the tooth enamel;

(4) a suitable viscosity to deliver the composition by selected desirable means; and,

(5) efficacy of bleaching of stained teeth enamel by the composition.

Accordingly, it is the object of this invention to provide a tooth whitener composition having, in combination:

(1) a predetermined concentration of active H2O2 in a film-forming complex; which provides for;

(2) effective bioadhesion/retention of the composition on teeth;

(3) advantageous penetration of the composition into the tooth enamel;

(4) a predeterminable viscosity to deliver the composition onto teeth by one or more suitable delivery means; and

(5) excellent bleaching action on stained teeth.

The following patents illustrate suitable active tooth whitening substances and delivery systems therefor: U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,077,047, U.S. Pat. No. 5,108,742; U.S. Pat. No. 5,122,370; U.S. Pat. No. 5,130,124; U.S. Pat. No. 5,183,901; U.S. Pat. No. 5,190,749; U.S. Pat. No. 5,206,385; U.S. Pat. No. 5,312,619; U.S. Pat. No. 5,989,569; U.S. Pat. No. 6,669,930; U.S. Pat. No. 6,770,266; U.S. Pat. No. 6,893,629 and U.S. 2003/0203338A1.

These and other objects and features of the invention will be made apparent from the following description.

IN THE DRAWINGS

The FIG. 1 is a plot of % Retention vs. Immersion Time for the tooth whitening composition of the invention on hydroxyapatite.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

What is described herein is a liquid, substantially anhydrous tooth whitener composition for effective delivery of a tooth-whitening amount of active whitening ingredient onto teeth, excellent bioadhesion and retention of said ingredient on teeth, advantageous penetration of said ingredient through tooth enamel, and effective bleaching of stained teeth, comprising, by weight,

(a) 10% to 75% of a complex which is (i) a mixture of 78 to 90% of water soluble polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) having a molecular weight corresponding to K-12 to K-120 values, and (ii) 10 to 22% of H2O2; providing 1 to 20% of active H2O2 onto a tooth surface;

(b) 0 to 20% of PVP K-60 to K-90, said PVP being present in said composition when the PVP in said complex has a K-value of less than 30, and/or the amount of PVP therein is less than 20%, and

(c) 30 to 90% of a substantially anhydrous solvent,

said composition having, in combination, a Brookfield viscosity of 50 to 2000 cps, an in vitro bioadhesion and retention on hydroxyapatite of at least 10% after 5 minutes while immersed in water, and a bleaching efficacy defined by Δ E values of at least 5 in the CIE (L*a*b*) color scale.

Suitably, the tooth whitener composition of the invention includes (a) PVP K-30 to K-90. When present, the PVP in (b) is suitably K-90.

Alternatively, the tooth whitener composition herein includes PVP K-90 in (a), and (b) is absent.

Preferably the amount of the complex (a) in the composition is 20 to 60% and (b) is 0.1-10%.

Preferably the solvent in the tooth whitener composition is ethanol in an amount of 65 to 80 wt. % of the composition.

Preferably, the tooth whitener composition of the invention has a viscosity of 75 to 1500 cps, most preferably 100 to 800 cps.

1. Amount of Activated H2O2

In one embodiment of the invention, the complex in the tooth whitening composition is available as the commercial product PEROXYDONE® (ISP), which is made up of, by weight, 80-83%, of water soluble polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), e.g. K-15/K-30/K-90, and 17-20%, by weight, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2).

This PVP-H2O2 complex, with or without added (b) PVP, e.g. Plasdone® K-90 (ISP), to increase its viscosity, is mixed with a suitable proportion of a solvent, e.g. absolute ethanol. When applied to the surfaces of the teeth of the user, the ethanol immediately begins to evaporate resulting in a marked increase in the concentration of H2O2 thereby enhancing the whitening power of the formulation.

Typical tooth whitening compositions of the invention are shown in Tables 1 and 2 below.

TABLE 1
EXAMPLE NO.
Ingredient 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Peroxydone ® K-30 23.3 27.77 40.0 37.5 35.0 23.3 27.8 40.0 23.3
% H2O2 4.2 5.1 8.0 7.5 7.0 4.7 5.6 7.8 4.3
Plasdone ® K-90 5.00 3.75 3.50 2.50 4.75
Ethanol (Abs.) 71.2 67.98 59.5 62.0 64.5 62.9 69.1 59.4 71.35
Brookfield 246 244 280 172 120 117 124 217 206
Viscosity, cPs

TABLE 2
EXAMPLE NO.
Ingredient 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Peroxydone ® K-30 27.78 17.50 20.00 62.50 20.00 25.00 40.00 40.00 40.00
Peroxydone ® K-90 7.50 5.00 3.75 20.00 15.00
% H2O2 5.3 5.0 4.8 13.1 8.0 7.9 7.9 7.8 7.9
Plasdone ® K-90 3.50 5.00 10.00 7.50
Ethanol (Abs.) 68.12 74.58 74.5 66.75 59.5 59.5 54.5 49.5 52.0
Brookfield 195 272 171 515 >1000 ~1000 179 790 488
Viscosity, cPs

TABLE 3
Example No. Ingredients
19 25% Peroxydone K-30 in Ethanol (18.7% H2O2)
20 25% Peroxydone K-90 in Ethanol (17.5% H2O2)
21 12.5% Peroxydone K-30 and 12.5% Peroxydone K-90
in Ethanol
22 50% Peroxydone K-30 in Ethanol
23 30% Peroxydone K-30 in PEG 400

2. Viscosity of Composition

As is shown in Tables 1 and 2, when the PVP ingredient in the complex includes PVP having a K-value of K-90, and the complex is present in an amount of at least 15% of the composition, the viscosity of the composition is 1000 cps or above. On the other hand, when the K-value of the PVP in the complex is K-30 or lower, and its amount therein is 40% or lower, the viscosity of the composition is less than 300 cps.

An increase in the Plasdone® K-90 content of the composition increases the viscosity of the composition significantly.

3. Bioadhesive/Retention of Composition on Teeth

The relative retention capacity of a test formulation on tooth surfaces can be measured by weight difference from the surface of a hydroxyapatite (HAP) plate that has been coated with the formulation and immersed in artificial saliva. An in-vitro test for formula weight retention on HAP is described below.

These in-vitro tests for formulation efficacy can be used to collectively determine the relative performance of paint-on teeth bleaching compositions.

Formula Retention Test

    • a) Accurately tare HAP-coated glass plate to 3 decimal places.
    • b) Paint HAP surface with a single coat of product, wait 30 seconds, and reweigh (3 dec.).
    • c) Place coated HAP in one liter of artificial saliva for 0, 1, 2 and 5 minutes time.
    • d) Remove each slide after its specified time, dry to constant weight, and weigh.
    • e) Determine initial product weight, and product weight after 1, 2 and 5 minutes submersion in artificial saliva.
    • f) Calculate percent retained on HAP versus time.

The FIGURE presents the percent retention on hydroxyapatite (HAP) versus immersion time of the teeth whitening formulations of the invention (Examples 19-23).

After five minutes immersion time, the 25% K-90 EtOH formulation is the best retained on HAP. The blend of K-90 and K-30 also exhibits effective retained time on HAP (at five minutes), as did the 50% K-30 EtOH formulation.

4. Bleaching Efficacy

The stain bleaching efficacy of the teeth whitening products compositions of the invention is determined by the rate of peroxide bioadhesion into the teeth and retention of the vehicle on the tooth surface. Two recent in-vitro methods to measure bleaching activity of such compositions were developed by Colgate-Palmolive Company and published in a poster session at the 2004 meeting of the Intl. Assoc, for Dental Research*. *Subramanyam, R.; Cameron, R; Colgate Palmolive Co.; “Comparative Delivery of Bleaching Agent from At-home Whitening Products”; Poster #3527; Presented at IADR Annual Meeting; Honolulu, Hi.; Mar. 10-13, 2004

These methods are based on a dye compound that acts as a surrogate for teeth stain on the exterior of teeth (extrinsic stain) or within the teeth (intrinsic stain). The rate of bleaching of a fixed amount of dye can thus indicate the peroxide release rate from a formulation. Additionally, the relative rate of absorption or penetration by the peroxide from the formulations can be determined by the bleaching of a previously dyed porous substance.

Formulation bleaching efficacy also can be determined by measuring the instrumental color difference of stained HAP disks before and after bleaching. A test was developed that measures the L*a*b* color of tea-stained disks before staining, after staining, and after bleaching. Color differences (Δ E) as a result of bleaching with different formulations can be determined mathematically.

Three separate bleaching efficacy tests were developed. The following procedures are presented for each separate test. Five simple Peroxydone®-based formulas of the invention were evaluated for performance in each test method. The hydrogen peroxide content was determined by permanganate titration.

Table 4 lists the averaged L*a*b* color results of each two disk set before staining, after staining and after staining and bleaching with each of the five prototype whitening formulations. Δ E color differences between each variable and no stain were calculated. Additionally, Δ E color differences realized by bleaching were calculated. These are Δ E's between stained disked before and after bleaching.

TABLE 4
B/4 Bleaching
Stain Stain Stain Stain Stain
Dry Only Only Only Only Only
L 80.97 81.28 79.87 79.08 81.99
A 4.29 4.19 4.56 4.33 4.37
B 9.15 9.09 8.66 8.94 9.04
E vs No Stain 19.388 19.073 20.174 20.902 18.522
After Bleaching
25% K-30 25% K-90 25% 30/90 50% K-30 30% K-30
Dry EtOH EtOH EtOH EtOH PEG 400
L 89.69 84.11 81.54 91.71 89.49
A 0.98 2.51 4.11 0.15 1.28
B 4.41 15.52 18.88 2.76 3.34
E vs 8.938 20.646 25.106 6.242 8.711
No Stain
Δ E - 10.464 7.218 10.367 14.668 9.918
Stain
Removal by
Bleaching

HAP Disk Bleaching Test

    • a) Tea Stain Solution Preparation—Ten (10) Lipton tea bags (25.4 g including paper) were placed in 215 g D.I. water at 195 F and held for 25 minutes. Bags were removed and stain solution was immediately used.
    • b) Formation of Pellicle and Uptake of Stain onto HAP Disks—Each disk was covered with 2 g of 1% mucin supernatant and incubated overnight (20 hours) in a test tube at 370C with gentle shaking using a vortex mixer at about a 400 speed. This forms a mucin coating on the disk that simulates a salivary pellicle.
    • c) Staining Disks—Each disk was removed from the mucin supernatant and rinsed by dipping in a large excess of D.I. water three times. All disks, except two (unstained), were individually placed in 2 ml of tea stain concentrate in test tubes, and incubated at 370C for one (1) hour with gentle shaking at a speed of 300. The disks were each removed from the stain, rinsed three (3) times by dipping in excess D.I. water and air-dried overnight.
    • d) All disks were individually numbered and separated into two disk sets. The color of each disk was measured by Minolta Spectrophotometer over the entire visual spectrum and by L*, a*, b*. Colors were averaged for each of the two-disk sets.
    • e) Stained disks were hydrated in artificial saliva for four hours, and placed flat in a petri plate partially submerged in artificial saliva.
    • f) Disk top surfaces were blotted dry, while partially submerged, and each two-disk set was painted with a single coat of teeth whitener (bleach) and held (covered, partially submerged) for 30 minutes.
    • g) Disks were removed from artificial saliva, rinsed three times in D.I. water, wiped dry, and placed in a desiccator overnight (20 hours) to dry.
    • h) The color of each bleached disk was measured by Minolta Spectrophotometer (as d above). Colors were averaged for each of the two-disk sets.
    • i) Average colors were plotted and appropriate Δ E values (mathematical color differences) were calculated. L*, a*, b* color and Δ E values are given below.
Reflected Color by Hunter Colorimeter

Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) uses L*a*b* scale

L is lightness 0=black, 100=pure white

a is yellow (+) and blue (−)

b is red (+) and green (−)

Total Color Difference (ΔE) between a sample and standard (or control)
ΔE=((ΔL)2+(Δa)2+(Δb)2)0.5
Reference: Hunter Associates Laboratory, Reston, Va.

While the invention has been described with particular reference to certain embodiments thereof, it will be understood that changes and modifications may be made which are within the skill of the art.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4942034 *Nov 14, 1988Jul 17, 1990Hill Ira DDental stimulator
US5008093Nov 8, 1989Apr 16, 1991Gaf Chemicals CorporationAnhydrous complexes of PVP and hydrogen peroxide
US5008106Dec 14, 1989Apr 16, 1991Gaf Chemicals CorporationMethod for reducing the microbial content of surfaces with a microbiocidal, anhydrous complex of PVP-H2 O2
US5066488Jun 6, 1990Nov 19, 1991Isp Investments Inc.Semi-anhydrous, suspension process for preparing uniform, free-flowing, fine, white powders of substantially anhydrous complexes of PVP and H2 O2 containing about 18 to about 22% H2 O2
US5077047Apr 8, 1991Dec 31, 1991Isp Investments Inc.Reacting fluidized bed of polymer with fine droplets of aqueou s peroxide; drying
US5108742Sep 12, 1990Apr 28, 1992Isp Investments Inc.Anhydrous complexes of PVP and H2 O2
US5122370May 20, 1991Jun 16, 1992Isp Investments Inc.Method for treating acne vulgaris with a composition containing a stable, high purity, substantially anhydrous complex of PVP-H2 O.sub.2
US5130124May 1, 1991Jul 14, 1992Isp Investments Inc.Stabilized, aqueous, film-forming antimicrobial compositions of hydrogen peroxide
US5159033Jan 15, 1992Oct 27, 1992Isp Investments Inc.Polymerization process using PVP-H2 O2 as free radical initiator
US5177113Mar 4, 1992Jan 5, 1993Isp Investments Inc.Free-standing, porous foam PVP:H2 O2 product
US5183901Jan 24, 1992Feb 2, 1993Isp Investments Inc.Urea-hydrogen peroxide-polyvinylpyrrolidone
US5190749Jan 13, 1992Mar 2, 1993Isp Investments Inc.Copolymers of vinyl pyrrolidone and a quaternary ammonium monomer complexed with H2 O2 in the form of free-flowing powders
US5206385Jul 2, 1992Apr 27, 1993Isp Investments Inc.Urea-hydrogen peroxide-polyvinylpyrrolidone process
US5312619Apr 30, 1992May 17, 1994Isp Investments Inc.Aqueous stable complex of a strongly swellable, moderately crosslinked polyvinylpyrrolidone and hydrogen peroxide
US5364601Dec 30, 1992Nov 15, 1994Bausch & Lomb IncorporatedTreating of contact lenses with compositions comprising PVP-H202
US5423337Mar 24, 1994Jun 13, 1995Ahlert; GaryContaining calcium peroxide
US5645848Jun 6, 1995Jul 8, 1997Bausch & Lomb IncorporatedControlled release composition for active substances into an aqueous medium
US5667753Oct 27, 1995Sep 16, 1997Advanced Sterilization ProductsVapor sterilization using inorganic hydrogen peroxide complexes
US5674436Nov 30, 1995Oct 7, 1997Basf AktiengesellschaftSpray drying in a stream of inert gas an aqueous solution of heterocyclic n-vinyl polymer and hydrogen peroxide
US5674450Jan 6, 1995Oct 7, 1997Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc.Vapor sterilization using a non-aqueous source of hydrogen peroxide
US5680876Jun 1, 1995Oct 28, 1997Gillette Canada Inc.Floss brush manufacture and product
US5698182Oct 22, 1996Dec 16, 1997Colgate Palmolive CompanyDentifrice composition containing calcium peroxide having heightened tooth whitening effect
US5718886Dec 23, 1996Feb 17, 1998Laclede Professional Products, Inc.Stabilized anhydrous tooth whitening gel
US5753770Dec 10, 1994May 19, 1998Basf AktiengesellschaftComplexing by spraying to a pulverulent or pregranulated matrix containing n-vinylcaprolactam homo- or copolymer, n-vinylpyrrolidone copolymer, n-vinylimidazole homopolymer, a mixture of saccharides or a mixture thereof
US5770182Jan 25, 1995Jun 23, 1998Ultradent Products, Inc.Methods for treating teeth with anticariogenic and antimicrobial dental compositions
US5785934Sep 19, 1996Jul 28, 1998Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc.Vapor sterilization using inorganic hydrogen peroxide complexes
US5820841Sep 19, 1996Oct 13, 1998Ethicon, Inc.Hydrogen peroxide complexes of inorganic salts and synthesis thereof
US5846570Jun 27, 1997Dec 8, 1998Chesebrough-Pond's Usa Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Stabilized hydrogen peroxide gel compositions
US5876666Aug 26, 1996Mar 2, 1999Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc.Release from nonaqueous hydrogen peroxide complex, medical instruments
US5879691Jun 6, 1997Mar 9, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyStrip of material conformable to shape of tooth, and adhering to tooth; the strip containing on surface a tooth whitening material
US5891453Mar 17, 1998Apr 6, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyDelivery system for a tooth whitener using a strip of material having low flexural stiffness
US5894017Jun 6, 1997Apr 13, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyDelivery system for an oral care substance using a strip of material having low flexural stiffness
US5922307Sep 25, 1996Jul 13, 1999R. Eric MontgomeryApplying gel comprising hydrogen peroxide in matrix of water, thickening agent, alkalinity adjusting agent, and calcium chelating agent to tooth surface
US5989526Feb 5, 1998Nov 23, 1999Novo Nordisk A/STooth bleaching
US5989569Jun 6, 1997Nov 23, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyDelivery system for a tooth whitener using a permanently deformable strip of material
US6045811Jun 6, 1997Apr 4, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyA dentifrices conforms to a shape of a tooth and its adjoining soft tissue for use in drug delivery, bleaching the teeth; disposable product
US6096328Nov 19, 1998Aug 1, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyDelivery system for an oral care substance using a strip of material having low flexural stiffness
US6106812Jan 13, 1999Aug 22, 2000Colgate-Palmolive CompanyDual component antiplaque and tooth whitening composition
US6136297Mar 17, 1998Oct 24, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyDelivery system for an oral care substance using a strip of material having low flexural stiffness
US6221341Nov 19, 1998Apr 24, 2001Oraceutical LlcTooth whitening compositions
US6312670Apr 2, 1998Nov 6, 2001R. Eric MontgomeryBleaching teeth in multicompartment vessels and hydrogen peroxide precursor and base compound
US6322773Aug 13, 1999Nov 27, 2001R. Eric MontgomerySingle exit dual compartment squeeze tube with a static mixer that comprises hydrogen peroxide precursor and alkaline ph-adjusting agent; simplification; efficiency; stability
US6331292Nov 16, 1998Dec 18, 2001R. Eric MontgomeoryTooth bleaching compositions
US6419906Mar 12, 2001Jul 16, 2002Colgate Palmolive CompanyStrip for whitening tooth surfaces
US6500408Jan 27, 2001Dec 31, 2002Jc Technologies, Inc.Enamel-safe tooth bleach and method for use
US6503486Feb 22, 2002Jan 7, 2003Colgate Palmolive CompanyStrip for whitening tooth surfaces
US6528470Jun 4, 1999Mar 4, 2003Lg Chemical Ltd.Bleaching activator
US6555020Oct 28, 1999Apr 29, 2003Den-Mat CorporationPolyacrylic acid thickening agent; aminocarboxylic acid/salt stabilizing agent.
US6576227Jan 26, 1999Jun 10, 2003Oraceutical Innovative Properties, LlcPeroxidase-activating oral compositions
US6669930Jan 15, 2003Dec 30, 2003Colgate Palmolive CompanyLiquid tooth whitening gel
US6682721Feb 13, 2001Jan 27, 2004Lg Household & Healthcare Ltd.Hydrophilic glass polymer as an adhesive layer in a matrix type on a backing layer and peroxide whitening agent
US6689344Sep 13, 2002Feb 10, 2004Lg Household & Healthcare Ltd.Patches for teeth whitening
US6692727Jun 30, 2000Feb 17, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanySystem including delivery composition of organosiloxane resin, volatile carrier capable of solubilizing resin, rheology modifier and oral care substance, and protective composition of organosiloxane resin and solubilizing volatile carrier
US6730316Nov 5, 2002May 4, 2004Ultradent Products, Inc.Dental bleach
US6770266May 24, 2002Aug 3, 2004Colgate Palmolive CompanyPh of the composition being maintained at an acidic level provides a peroxide source that is stable to decomposition on storage
US6780401May 27, 2003Aug 24, 2004Lg Household & Healthcare Ltd.Using peroxy compound in adhesive matrix; patch
US6893629Oct 30, 2002May 17, 2005Isp Investments Inc.Delivery system for a tooth whitener
US20020006387May 24, 2001Jan 17, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyStrip containing peroxy compounds
US20020012685May 24, 2001Jan 31, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyProviding flexible strip of material, applying a layer of a tooth whitening substance selected from peroxides, metal chlorites, perborates, percarbonates, peroxyacids, hypochlorites to front surface of teeth, conforming strip
US20020061283Oct 31, 2001May 23, 2002R. Eric MontgomeryHydrogen peroxide-containing compounds that are maintained at a substantially constant basic pH during bleaching in the presence of a calcium chelating agent
US20020064564Oct 31, 2001May 30, 2002R. Eric MontgomeryTooth bleaching compositions
US20020068041Oct 31, 2001Jun 6, 2002R. Eric MontgomeryTooth bleaching compositions
US20020131937Jan 17, 2002Sep 19, 2002R. Eric Montgomery And Idex Dental Sciences, Inc.Methods of whitening teeth
US20030072722Aug 2, 2001Apr 17, 2003Nathoo Salim A.Tooth whitening hydrogels
US20030211052Jun 13, 2003Nov 13, 2003Constantine GeorgiadesTooth whitening composition and method employing dicarboxylic acid whitening agent
US20040062724May 23, 2003Apr 1, 2004Moro Daniel G.Thin, flexible, multilayer film; applying, adhesion to teeth; supplying active materials
US20040191188Mar 31, 2004Sep 30, 2004Brian FreedmanBooster and activator composition for tooth-whitening agents
US20050036956Aug 15, 2003Feb 17, 2005Lin FeiNon-aqueous liquid tooth whitening composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification424/53, 510/418, 510/392, 510/296, 510/406, 510/439, 525/60
International ClassificationA61K8/22
Cooperative ClassificationA61K8/22, A61Q11/00, A61K2800/31, A61K8/8176
European ClassificationA61K8/81R2, A61Q11/00, A61K8/22
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 18, 2013ASAssignment
Free format text: RELEASE OF PATENT SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA;REEL/FRAME:030025/0320
Owner name: HERCULES INCORPORATED, DELAWARE
Effective date: 20130314
Owner name: ASHLAND LICENSING AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LLC, O
Owner name: AQUALON COMPANY, DELAWARE
Owner name: ISP INVESTMENTS INC., DELAWARE
Sep 19, 2011ASAssignment
Effective date: 20110823
Free format text: PATENT RELEASE;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. (F/K/A THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK);REEL/FRAME:026930/0774
Owner name: ISP CAPITAL, INC., NEW JERSEY
Owner name: ISP CHEMICAL PRODUCTS, INC., NEW JERSEY
Owner name: VERONA, INC., NEW JERSEY
Sep 16, 2011ASAssignment
Effective date: 20110823
Owner name: THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA, AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT,
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:ASHLAND LICENSING AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LLC;HERCULES INCORPORATED;AQUALON COMPANY;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:026918/0052