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Publication numberUS813918 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1906
Filing dateDec 29, 1899
Priority dateDec 29, 1899
Publication numberUS 813918 A, US 813918A, US-A-813918, US813918 A, US813918A
InventorsAlbert Schmitz
Original AssigneeAlbert Schmitz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tubes, single or compound, with longitudinal ribs.
US 813918 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 813,918. PATENTED FEB. 27, 1906.

A. SGHMITZ.

TUBE, SINGLE 0R COMPOUND, WITH LONGITUDINAL RIBS.

' APPLICATION FILED D50. 29, 1899.

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UNITED STATES (iii? if PATENT OFFICE.

ALBERT somiir'rz, or RAUNI-IEIM, GERMANY. TUBES, SINGLE R COMPOUND, WITl-i LOINGITUDINAL mas.

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, ALBERT Scnmrz, a citizen of the Grand Duchy of Hesse, and a resident 'of No. 50 Frankfurterstrasse, Raunheim-on-the-Main, in the Grand Duchy of Hesse, German Em ire, have invented certain new and useful mprovements in Tubes, Single or Compound, with Longitudinal Ribs, of which the following is a s eclfication.

Mypresent invention re wings.- Tubes of this kind are well known and are particularlyemployed on an extensive scale as heating or cooling tubes or in bo1 lers. The two edges of the skelp from WhlCh these tubes are formed are joined to- I gethe'r by the so-called overlapped weldand since the joint thus formed extends the full length of the tubes the said tubes are weak at this place and do not fofier sufiicient security against their breaking-by the highsteam-pressures now in use and at their em- .pl'o ent in steam-superheaters.

he object of my present invention is to overcome-these disadvantages and to furnish a tube' having longitudinal ribs or wings which Stand sufficient resistance even to the highest steamressures and also has a reat transverse and torsional strength. hese im roved tubes are made from two or more tu ularmembers one or more of which (cor- .responding to the res ective urpose of applicatlon) are provide with ongitudinal ribs or wings turned inwardly or outwardly. In

some modifications of my improved tube two of the tubular members may be entirely welded to ether and the ribs turned inwardly or outwardly or inwardly and outwardly,while in other-modifications the smooth surface of.

one tubular membenbeing provided with longltudin'al ribs or not, contacts with the free ends of the longitudinal ribs of another tubular member and is welded to said ribs, which niembe'r acts. to strengthenor bridge the'- ss joint oftli'eother tubular member.; Inconsequence of the var ous mod fipa-.

Specification of Letters Patent. Application filed Deoeinber 29, 1899. SerialNo. 742,014.

ates to improve- 'ments in tubes having-longitudinal ribs or tions in their form and construction my improved tubes allow of an extensive employment for example, as heating or cooling tubes or in boilers or other evaporatin apparatus. Furthermore, they may be a vantageousl employed as hollow shafts or in the chemica industry for conducting two separate fluids or gases therethrough.

, The manufacture of my improved tubes is efi ected by the process described in the United States Letters Patent No. 661,108, granted-to me on the 6th of November, 1900.

g In the accompanying drawings different modifications of tubes according to my present invention are shown in transverse sectional views. v 1

In Figure 1 the ribs are. turned inwardly posed out of alinement with'the jointof said ribbed tubular member. In Fig. 2 the ribs of the ribbed tubular member are turned outserted within. In Fig. 3 both tubular members areribbed, the mner Etubular member bein turned inwardly mem er being turne outwardly. In Flg. 4 the ribbed tubular member is turned outwardly and the other tubular member surrogmds the same, being sup orted against the r1 s. is turned inwardly, while the other tubular member is inserted within the'sa'me and rests against the ribs. In Fig. 6--botli tubular members are ribbed, the inner. tubular member being turned outwardly, resting against the outer tubular member, and the outer tubular member being turned inwardly, resting .againstthe inner tubular member, the ribs inter rojecting. In Fig. 7 three' -tubular ,m'em ers are employed. The inner one is not, provided with anyribs. The central tubular member has its ribs turned inwardly, bearing against the inner tubular member, and the outer tubular member also has its ribs turned inwardly, bearing against the central tubular member.

res onding parts through the several views. 11 the example shown in Fig.- 1 the tube is composed of the two tubular members a and d. A skelp with longitudinal ribs 6 fixed upon it on one face is'at first 'converted'into a tubular member a by" drawing .it-"in the Patented Feb. 27, 1906. f

In Fig. 5 the ribbe tubular memberand the other tubular member suirounds the ribbed tubular member,. with its joint diswardly, while the other tubular member is inand the outer tubular Like charactersof reference indicate cor- ,known manner through acone. It is then placed with itsseam 0, formed by the two edges of the skelp, downward upon a smooth the fiat skelp is drawn into tubular member d,

and then a skelp having the ribs bis formed with said ribs outwardly around the smooth tubular member (1. The two tubular members a and (Z are then likewise entirely welded together at the seams c and 6, respectively, bemg out o alinement.

In the modification shown in Fig. 3 both tubular members are provided with ribs, the inner tubular member a havin its ribs 1) turned inwardly and the outer tu ular member (1 having the ribs I) turned outwardly. The two tubular members are likewise entirely welded to ether at f and the seam c of the inner ribbe tubular member being disposed out of alinement with the seam c of the outer ribbed tube.

I must remark here that the results obtained with my improved tubes are not obtained with theribbed tubes hitherto used,

. tubular mem even if the walls of the latter are made as thick, as I obtain the same in my improved tubes by using two tubular members, for it will be readily understood that my tubes in which two tubular members entirely surround, together stand a much greater resistance than tubes in which the two edges of the skelp forming the tube only overlap each other for a small distance.

In the example represented in Fig. 4 a rlbbed skelp is at first converted into a tube having'its ribs bturned outwardly, and then a smooth skellp is formed around said ribbed er a in such a manner that the inner face of the tubular member 1) contacts with the ends 9 of the ribs 1), to which it is welded. A similar tube is shown in Fi 5. in this modification at first the smooth s elp 1s drawn into a tubev and the ribbed tubular member a, having its ribs b turned inwardly, surrounds the latter, the ends 9 of the ribs vb resting upon the smooth surface of the tubular member 11, to which they are welded. The tube shown. in Fig. 6 is composed of two rlbbed tubular members a and a, the ribs 1) of the inner tubular member a being turned outwardly and resting Withtheir ends'g against the inner side of. the outer tubular member a, to which they are welded, the interprojeotin ribs 6 of the outer tubular mem ber a eing turned inwardly and resting with their ends gagainst the surface of the inner tubular member a, tojwhich they are likewise welded. In the modification illustrated in-Fi 7 three tubular members are em loyed. e inner tube (1 is made out of a at tubular member. The second tube a is ribbed and has its ribs I; turned inwardly, the ends 9 of said ribs being welded to the surface of tubular member 11. 'The outer ribbed tubular member (1 also has its ribs I) turned inwardly," the ends 9 of which being welded to the surface of tubular member a. As will be seen from Figs. 4 to 7, a number of radiating-chambers are obtained between two adjacent tubular members in this kind of tubes. Therefore the latter'may be preferably a plied in the chemical industry, for examp e, for quickly heating a fluid, in which case the latter may be conducted through the inner tubular member and steam through the radiating-chambers. The. tubes of this kind also may be advantageously em loyed as hollow shafts, for they have doubt ess as much capacity of resistance as those with a massive wall. However they are more easy in weight than those and offer a great saving of material.

The dimensions, the form, the position,

and the number of the ribs or wings may be varied asrequired in the different modifications. However, in all modifications of my improved tube two adjacent tubular mem-- bers must be joined together in sucha manner that the joints of the same are not in ahnement, so that, as already mentioned above,

each tubular member acts to strengthen or bridge the joint of the adjacent tubular 'member.

Having thus articularly described my said invention, w at I claim is 1. A tubeoo'mposed of two tubular members, one of which has lon itudinal ribs or wings, said members being ormed from two skelps and being entirely Weldedtogether and the joints formed by the edges of the two skelps being out of alinement,substangiall as -described and for the purpose set ort 2. A tube com osed of two-tubular mem- IIO bers both of whic havelongitudinal ribs or wings, said membersbeing formed fromtwo skelps and being entirely welded together and the joints formed'by the edges of the two skelps being out of alinement, substantially as described and for the purpose set forth.

3. A tube composed of two tubular members, one ofwhich has longitudinal ribs or wings and the other of which contacts with the ends of said ribs or wings and is welded to the same, the members being formed from two skelps and having the joints formed by the edges of the skelps out of alinement, substantially, as described and for the purpose set forth.

4. A tube composed of two tubular members both of which have longitudinal ribs or ribs resting against the smooth surface of the wings, each of said members resting against adjacent member and being welded to the the ends of the ribs of the other member and same, the joints of two adjacent members be- I 5 being welded to said ribs, said members being ing out of alinement, substantially as de- 5 formed from two skelps, the joints formed by scribed and for the purpose set forth. the edges of the skelps being out of alinement, In testimony whereof I afiix my signature substantfially1 as described and for the purin presence of two witnesses.

ose set ort p 5. A tube.'composed of a pluralit of tu- ALBERT SOHMITZ' "m bular members one or more of whic is r0.- Witnesses:

vided with longitudinal ribs or wings, eac of HENRY HASPER, said ribbed members having the ends of its WOLDEMAR HAUPr.

Referenced by
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Classifications
International ClassificationF28D7/10, F28F1/00, F28F1/40
Cooperative ClassificationF28F1/40, F28D7/103, F28D7/106, F28F1/003, Y10S122/16
European ClassificationF28D7/10F, F28D7/10E, F28F1/40, F28F1/00B