Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS814996 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 13, 1906
Filing dateJul 1, 1905
Priority dateJul 1, 1905
Publication numberUS 814996 A, US 814996A, US-A-814996, US814996 A, US814996A
InventorsCasler Warne
Original AssigneeCasler Warne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game-cards.
US 814996 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. PATBNTED MAR. 13, 1906.

c. WARNE. GAME CARDS.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 1, 1905.

2 $HEETS-SHEET 1.

ATTORNEYS WITNESSES:

APPLIGATION FILEQD JULY 1. 1906.

PATENTED-MAR. 13, 1906.

'- 0. WARNE.

GAME CARDS;

t v INVENTOI? aaler IIC iZYZ/E M M @K B y ATTORNEYS '2 SHEETS-SHEET z.

45 in each of the two suits, one of each number CASLER WARNE,

OF ASBURY PARK, NEW JERSEY.

. GAME-CARDS.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, OAsLER WARNE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Asbury Park, in the county of Monmouth and State of New Jersey, have invented new and useful Improvements in Game-Cards, ofwhich the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This'invention relates to new and useful improvementsin game-cards; and it has for its object to provide a pack of playing-cards with which certain interesting and instructive games may be played.

The invention will be hereinafter fully described, and the novel features will be point-- .ed out in the appended claims.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, which show the different suits and face-- cards. I

Fi ure 1 is the king of the page suit. Fig. 2 is t e queen of the page suit. Fig. 3 is the crowned castle of the page suit. Fig. 4 is the crowned knight'of the page suit. Fig. 5

.is the crowned bishop of the page suit.

Fig. 6 is the jester. seven of the pawn suit. Fig. 8 is the crowned two of the pawn suit, and Fig. 9 is the uncrowned knight of the page suit.

The game consists of forty-eight cards and the jester. There are two suits-pawns and pages-in the pack, each of which is divided into two divisionsnamely, pawns, king pawns, pages, and king pages. The suit shown at G is the suit which is designated as the pawns, and this suit is divided by crowning certain cards, as shown at H, where the crown e. appears over the pawn h. The

"other suit, which is designated as the pages,

is shown at D, where the card is crowned, there being another division of this suit, in which the character (1 appears without the crown e. There are in the pack thirty-two numeral-cards, which are numbered one to eight, there being two of each number in each suit being crowned. The face-cards consist of four bishops, four knights, and four castles,two of each of which are pawns and the other two pages. One of each of the two otherwise similar cards is crowned. j

E represents the crowned bishop of the page suit, which is referred to as bishop of king pages, D the crowned knight of the page suit, which is referred to as knight of Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed July 1,1905. $erial No. 267.953..

' the cards, in some of which Fig. 7 is the uncrowned Patented March 13, 1906.

king pages, and C the crowned castle of the page suit, referred to as' castle of king pages. There are two kings and two queens in the pack, the king and queen of pages be ing shown at A B, respectively, of the draw-' ings. It will be seen that these cards have in one corner the characters designating the uncrowned page suit, while obliquely in the opposite corner the character of another co or designating the crowned page suit appears. The other king and queen are of the pawn suit,'the cards being similarly printed, with the character designating the uncrowned pawn in one corner and obliquely in the opposite corner the crowned pawn. I prefer to I print the characters designating the uncrowned pawns and the crowned pages of one color and the uncrowned pages and thecrowned'pa'wns of another color. A card F, designated as the jester, is included in the pack, for various games may be played with it is necessary to use this card.

In playing the described'game the names 1 castle, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, and

two. When two cards of the same suit, one crowned and the other uncrowned, but otherwise of thesame character, are played, the

crowned card is of the greater value; but it is of less value than an uncrowned card of a higher rank.

The intendedrules for playing the new game for which the cards were invented are as follows: The game may be played with two or four players. When four persons play the game, they usually play partners. The dealer has the choice of the suit for himself and partner; but he must select the suit before dealing the cards. The cards are dealt one-at a time from left to right until the whole pack, excepting the jester, is dealt out. The object in the game is to release'the facecards by playing certain numeralcards which hold them. They are as follows: Fives of both'divisions of the same suit as the kings release the kings; fours of both divisions of the same suit as-the queen release the queens; three and siXof the same suit as the bishops release the bishops; two and seven of the same suit as the knights release the knights; aces and eights of the same suit as the castles release the castles; crowned or uncrownednumeral-cards or a crowned and an uncrowned numbered card will release crowned or uncrowned face-cards. For example, three and six crowned, three and six uncrowned, or three and six, one crowned and the other uncrowned, will release bishop, either crowned or uncrowned. The two cards must be played in the same trick to release the face-card, as an ace played in one trick and an eight played in another will not release the castle. In the releasing contest it is necessary for the players to follow suit, which is the first card led in the trick, or when this cannot be done to throw off a card of the opposite suit; but the cards which are played of the opposite suit will not release the face-cards. As the player releases the cards he immediately calls for them, and the holder, if he is an opponent and not a partner, must deliver them to him, for which he reeeives in return a card which the receiver of the face-card thinks to be of the least value, thus keeping an equal number of cards in the hands of the different players. The highest suit-card played wins the trick, and the winner leads in the next. A player cannot play his opponent s face-cards, and as it is not advantageous to play one of his own face-cards he will then throw off a numeral-card of the opposite suit when he cannot follow the suit led. The object is for a player to release the face-cards of his suit which are held by his opponents. Should the face card that is called for be held by a players partner, no exchange is necessary. The partner playing the last releasecard calls for the release. Should it be an opponent that plays the last release-card, the player that plays the first release-card calls the release. If the opponents play both the release-cards, which is seldom, the partner to the right of the opponent playing the last release-card calls the release. The players endeavor to release the face-cards of their suit which are held by their opponents. All the released cards should be held until the final contest, which takes place after a player has no more numeral-cards in his hand. When this takes place, the players discard all the numeralcards and all the face-cards which are out of their suit, holding only the face-cards of their own suit, when two of the opposing players take the remaining cards which their partners hold and with those which they have in their hands continue the play, the side taking the last trick in the releasing contest having the lead. During the remainder of the game no suit is followed. The highest card played takes the trick, and when two cards of equal rank are the highest played the first of these played takes the trio The player taking the greatest number of tricks wins the game for himself and his partner. The game is ended at the end of any trick when one layer has no more cards.

The only difference between the two and four handed game is that in the two-handed game one-half of the pack is dealt one at a time, leaving the rest stacked on the board face downward, from which a player and his opponent each take one from the top after each trick is taken, the one taking the trick taking the card first, and this is done until the stack is exhausted or one has all face-cards in his hand. Each player plays twice around in the releasing contest, making four cards played in each trick; but in the final contest they play but once around, the same as in the four-handed game. To change the game a little, if desired, instead of drawing from the stack after each trick draw is made at the end of each round and at the end of the trick also, making two drawings in each trick, and the person that leads first draws first at the end of the round. As the player releases he calls for his opponents card, and if his oppo nent has it he hands it to him, and in return he receives a card from his opponents hand; but if he has not the card account is kept and should the opponent draw it from the stack he hands it to the player and receives a card in exchange. Should it not appear before the halt is called, the player picks them out of the stack. Should the player draw from the stack one already released, the draw is counted just the same as if it had been some other card. All face-cards of the players own suit held and drawn do not have to be released. Other features of the two-handed game are the same as the fourhanded.

In playing some other games when the cards are played as of two suits the relative value of the cards is as follows: king, queen, ace, bishop, knight, castle, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, and two, the crowned cards being higher than the uncrowned cards of the same character; but when the cards are played as of four different suits all the cards of the same kind are of equal value, and then the relative value is as follows: ace, king, queen, bishop, knight, castle, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two. The reason why kings and queens are higher than an ace when the cards are played as two suits is the kings and queens are kings and queens of both divisions of the suit, and therefore have double value, while the ace is only of one division of the suit. Therefore a king or queen will beat one ace; but when the cards are played as four different suits the kings and queens are played as either suit printed thereon, therefore single, and an ace will beat a king or a ueen.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A deck of cards made up of two suits in which several cards in each suit are distinguished by a sign from the remaining cards of the suit, and other cards in the same suit which have in one place the said sign in con nection With the character denoting the suit and in another place the character without the said sign. I

2. A deck of cards made up of a series of suits each of which is divided, each suit having cards each of which represents the -difler-' ent divisions of one suit. v

3. A deck of cards made up of a plurality of suits, several cards of each of said suits bedistinguished by a sign.

6. A deck of cards in which the face-cards correspond in number andin character with the kings, queens, bishops, knights and castles in a game of chess, and a series of numeral-cards, in duplicate, the duplicate face and numeral cards being distinguished by a si n.

7. A deck of cards in which the face-cards I correspond in number and in character with the kings, queens, bishops, knights and castles in a game of chess, and a series of numeral-cards, in duplicate, the duplicate face and numeral cards being distinguished by different colors and a sign.

8. A deck of cards in which the face-cards correspond in number and in character with the kings, queens, bishops, knights and castles in a game of chess, the duplicate cards being distinguished by a difference in color and a series of numeral-cards.

9. A deck of cards in which the face-cards in two suits'correspond in number and in character with the kings, queens, bishops, knights and castles in a. game of chess, the duplicate cards in the same suits being distinguished by signs and a series of numeralcards.

the face-cards in each suit represent in number and in character the king, queen, bishops, knights and castles on one side of the board in a game of chess, the duplicate cards in the same suitbeing distinguished by signs and -eight cards in which the face-cards represent in number and in character the kings, queens, bishops, knights, and castles in'a game of chess, and in which the remaining thirty two cards are numeral-cards.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to-- this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

CASLER WARNE. Witnesses:

EVERARD B. MARSHALL, F. W. HANAFORD.

10'. A deck of cards in two suits, in Which I

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02