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Publication numberUS816226 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1906
Filing dateOct 11, 1905
Priority dateOct 11, 1905
Publication numberUS 816226 A, US 816226A, US-A-816226, US816226 A, US816226A
InventorsHarry Feder
Original AssigneeHarry Feder
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Moisture-proof structure.
US 816226 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED MAR. 2'7, 1906 H. FEDER. MOISTURE P ROOF STRUCTURE.

APPLIOATION FILED OGT.11.1905.

mama;

UNITED erm ne HARRY FEDER, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

MOISTURE PRQGF $TRU$TURE= Specification of Letters Eatent.

Patented March 2'2, 1906.

Application filed Gcto'ner 11, 1905, Serial Ila. 282,224.

To all whom it may concern: 1

Be it known that 1, Hana: FEDER, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the borough of Manhattan, in the city and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Mois'turel1oof Structures, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to a moisture-proof structure in which a strand or strands of fibrous material. are provided with a coating ofcellular adhesive sizing having its outer surface developed into a moisture-proof skin or envelop.

' the stran lnthe accompanying drawings, Figure 1 represents in side elevation the moistureproof structure in tubular form surrounding a Wire core and consisting ofan mner moisture-proof tube'formed by a treated-paper strand and an outer tubetformed by a treated sume, the ist of the invention being not the particular orm of the complete structure nor the particular form, number, and relation of the strands which compose the structure, but rather the nature of the moisture-proof envelop and the intimate relation of the adhe- 4 sive sizin on which/ the envelop is formed to i or strands which form the foundation of the structure.

In making the structure in tubular form a strand 1, of paper, is impregnated with a cellular sizing, such as casein-for instance, by passing it through a thin solution thereofand then it is wound on a core 2for example, a wire-the exterior of the wound strand being then submitted to the action of a hardening fluid, such as formaldehyde, by passing it through a vcror or other fluid form thereof. The forma dehyde or other hardening or coagulating fluid enters the cells of the casein and develops its exterior'surface into a skin or envelo which will resist water and moisture. In t e exaggerated sections Figs.

2, 3, and 4 the cellular sizing is denoted by 3 U and the waterproof envelop by This tubular structure, with its paper strand, may be alone relied upon-to protect the core from moisture, or it may be covered by an outer tube formed of textile material as a basefor instance, a tube of braided threads 5- treated with a cellular sizing, such as casein, the latter having its exterior surface developed into a waterproof skin 6 by the action of formaldehyde. This latter structure may also be alone relied upon to protect the core, as shown in Fig. 3 i

In Fig. 5 the woven fabric isforrned of paper strands 7, treated witha cellular sizing, as hereinabove explained, and having its eX- terior surface developed'into a waterproof skin or envelop- 8.

The several strands, whether in the form of a flat fabric, as shown in Fig. 5, or in the form of a tubular fabric, as shown in Fig. 1, are held securely in the desiied relation to one another, as well as being held individually in their twisted, wound, or entwined form, by the cellular adhesive sizing, and when the exterior surface of this sizing is developed into a waterproof skin or envelop by 'the action of formaldehyde the structure becomes impervious to moisture and is tough and du rable.

The treatment with the formaldehyde or other hardening or coagulating fluid should take place only after the strands have been treated with casein and have been formed either individually or collectively into a permanent product.

What I claim is 1. A moisture-proofed fabric composed of one or more strands of fibrous material coat ed with a cellular adhesive sizing for maintaining the formation of the strands, the we terior surface of the sizing being developed I into an impervious moisture-proof skin or envelop.

2. A moisture-proofed fabric of tubular structure composed. of one or more strands of fibrous material coated with a cellular adhesive sizing for maintaining the formation of the strands, the exterior surface of the sizing being developed into an impervious moistureroof skin or envelop.

3. moisture-proof fabric of tubular structure provided with a core,said fabric being composed of one or more strands of fibrous material, coated with a cellular adhesive siz- T in; for maintaining the formation of the 1 strands, theexuerier surface of the sizing being developed into :ui impervious moisbure- T proof skin or GHVUl-rp. l "i. A omis-fure-prooled structure eornprislog :1 core, a moisture-proofe-(l paper envelop 1 surrounding the core and a moisture-proofed textile envelop surrounding the paper en-- 1 m 'i'elop, the said envelops including a body of sizing having its exterior surface developed into a moisture-resistin skin or envelop.

in testimony that I claim the foregoing as my invention 1 have signed my mime, in presenceof two witnesses, this m day of Octoher, 1905.

HARRY FEDER. Vlitnesses:

FREDK. HAYNES, F. GEORGE BARRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4096305 *Apr 14, 1975Jun 20, 1978Alton Box Board CompanyRigid-when-wet paperboard containers and their manufacture
US5659994 *Nov 29, 1995Aug 26, 1997Berkley, Inc.Braided flyline
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF16J15/20, B29C53/58