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Publication numberUS817233 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 10, 1906
Filing dateOct 30, 1905
Priority dateOct 30, 1905
Publication numberUS 817233 A, US 817233A, US-A-817233, US817233 A, US817233A
InventorsJohn V Emmerling
Original AssigneeJohn V Emmerling
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus.
US 817233 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED APR. 10, 1906.

J. V. EMMERLING. GAME APPARATU8. APPLICATION FILED 001:.30, 1905.

UFTTTEU STATES narnnr orrrcn.

GAME APPERATUS Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented April 10, 1906.

Application filed October 30,1905. Serial No. 284,978.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, J OHN V. EMMERLING, a citizen of the United States, residing at Buffalo, in the county of Erie and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Game Apparatus, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to an improved checker-game; and its object is to provide a modified form of the game which affords a greater variety of moves or plays than ordinary checkers, thus rendering the game more interesting.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view of the game-board. Figs. 2 and 3 are perspective views showing different faces of one of the light pieces belonging to the central or white field of the game-board. Fi s. 4 and 5 are similar views of such a piece befonging to the red field. similar views of such a piece belonging to the blue field. Fig. 8 is a perspective view of one of the dark pieces.

Similar letters of reference indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views.

A indicates the game-board, which instead of bearing the ordinary single field of squares is divided into a plurality of fields, preferably three, which are designated B B B respec tively, in the drawings. The squares l) b b of the respective fields on which the game is played are of different colors, preferably red, white, and blue, to represent the national colors of the United States, while the intermediate or background squares b are of a shade or color contrasting with the squares b b l).

C, D, E, and F are the men or pieces of the game apparatus, which preferably have the form of cubes or rectangular blocks. The pieces of each player consist of three sets or groups, one for each field of the board. Each of the pieces O corresponding to the white field B has one face a colored white, this being its main face and denoting the set and field to which it belongs. On another face each of these white pieces has a red stripe c and a white stripe 0 as shown in Fi 2, on a third face it has a blue stripe a? and a white stripe 0 Fig. 3, and on a fourth face it has red, white, and blue stripes c c and 0 On one of the remaining two faces it has the representation of a star 0 or other suitable mark, which face when turned up indicates that the piece has the power or value of a king. Each of the pieces D corresponding to the red field Figs. 6 and 7 are E has one face 01 colored red, denoting the set to which it belongs. On another face it has a red stripe d and a white stripe d, Fig. l, on a third face it has red, white, and blue stripes d d d, Fig. 5, and on a fourth face the representation of a star, as shown. Each of the pieces E corresponding to the blue field B has a face 6 colored blue to denote the set to which it belongs. On another face it has a blue stripe e and a white stripe c, Fig. 6, on a third face it has red, white, and blue stripes e, e, and c, Fig. 7, and on a fourth face the representation of a star.

The pieces illustrated in Figs. 2 to 7, inclusive, belong to one side or player and their top and bottom faces are light, there being thirteen of such pieces, while the correspondin faces of the pieces belonging to the other sic e, of which one is shown. in Fig. 8, have dark or black top and bottom faces, there being also thirteen of these pieces.

In setting the pieces the white ones O are placed on the corresponding squares b with their white faces 0 upward, the red pieces D are placed on the corresponding squares b with their red faces d upward, and the blue pieces E are placed on the squares I) with their blue faces 6 upward, as shown in Fig. 1. The players move alternately, as in ordinary checkers. Ordinarily each piece can be advanced on its own field only; but when the opportunity offers to jump an opponents piece it may land on either of the other fields. In that case it adds to its own power the power of moving upon that field to which the jumped piece belonged and also the field upon which it lands. To indicate this additional power, that face is turned upward which bears the three stripes corresponding to the color of its own field and those of the other two. For example, if a white piece jumps a red one it has the power to move upon the red and the white fields B B and its face bearing the two red and white stripes c c is turned upward to indicate its changed character. If the same piece then jumps a blue piece, it acquires the further power of moving upon the blue field B and its face with the red white, and blue stripes c c c is turned upward, indicating that it may move upon all the fields. Should, for instance, a white piece jump a red piece located on the white field and land upon the blue field, it acquires the power of thereafter moving upon the red and blue fields as Well as its own white field. When a players piece reaches a square in the first row of his opponents I eachbearingastripecorrespondingto thefield end of the board, it becomes a king, with power to move forward or backward, as in ordinary checkers, and the face bearing the star is turned upward to indicate that power. If a piece jumps a star-piece, it becomes a king or star-checker itself. It will thus be seen that the various changes in the power of the pieces in moving across the board render the game more intricate than the ordinary game of checkers, enhancing its interest accordingly.

I claim as my invention 7 1. A game apparatus, comprising a board divided into a plurality of fields each subdivided into squares or spaces, alternating squares of each field being of the same color but distinguished by different colors from those of the other field or fields, and a set of pieces for each field, the pieces of each set being provided on one portion thereof with a mark corresponding to the companion field and on other portions thereof with marks corresponding to their own field and one or more of the other fields, substantially as set forth.

2. A game apparatus, comprising a board divided into a plurality of fields each subdivided into squares or spaces, alternating squares of each field being of the same color but distinguished by different colors from those of the other fields, and a set of pieces for each field, thepieces of each set each hav ing one face colored to match the squares of the corresponding field, another face provided with stripes corresponding to its own field and the other fields, and a third face bearing stripes corresponding to its own field and one of the other fields, substantially as set forth.

3. A game apparatus, comprising a board divided into a plurality of fields each subdivided into squares or spaces, alternating squares of each field being of the same color but distinguished by different colors from those of the other fields, and a set of pieces for each field, the pieces of one set each having a face colored to match the squares of the corresponding field, another face provided with stripes corresponding to its own field and the other fields, and two additional faces to which the piece belongs and a stri e corresponding .to one of the other fiel s, the pieces of the other sets each having one face colored to match the squares of the corresponding field, another face provided with stripes corresponding to its own field and the other fields and a third face bearing stripes corresponding to its own field and one of the other fields, substantially as set forth.

4. A game apparatus, comprising aboard divided into a plurality of fields each subdivided into squares or spaces, alternating squares of each field being of the same color but distinguished by difierent colors from those of the other fields, and a set of pieces for each field, the pieces of each set each having one face colored to match the squares of the corresponding field, another face provided with stripes corresponding to its own field and the other fields, a third face bearing stripes corresponding to its own field and one of the other fields, and a fourth face bearing the representation of a star, substantially as set forth.

5. A game apparatus, comprising a board divided into three fields each subdivided into a plurality of squares or spaces, alternating spaces of each field being of the same color but distinguished by different colors from those of the other fields, a set of pieces for the middle field each having a face colored to match the squares of said field, another face provided with stripes corresponding to the middle field and both of the other fields, and two additional faces each bearing stripes corresponding to the middle field and one of the other fields, the pieces belonging to the side fields each having one face colored to match the squares of the corresponding field, another face having three stripes corresponding to the respective fields, and a third face bearing stripes corresponding to its own field and the middle field, substantially as set orth.

Witness my hand this 25th day of October, 05

JOHN V. EMMERLING. Witnesses:

C. F. GEYER, E. M. GRAHAM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3608902 *Dec 10, 1969Sep 28, 1971Joseph A WeisbeckerCube game
US4196905 *Jan 23, 1978Apr 8, 1980Yanari Frank FGame apparatus
US4280703 *Sep 27, 1979Jul 28, 1981Slone Keith WThree dimensional game with political theme
US4391448 *Jan 19, 1981Jul 5, 1983Hermann 3Rd ConradMethod of playing a two-player board game
US4634129 *Aug 27, 1984Jan 6, 1987Hugo RomanColor correlated game board and playing pieces
US5636841 *Sep 11, 1995Jun 10, 1997Burroughs; Robert C.Checker game using cube shaped checker pieces
US7401781 *Aug 27, 2004Jul 22, 2008Winsor ConceptsMethod for playing a game
US8074985 *Mar 27, 2008Dec 13, 2011Winsor ConceptsVirtual game
US8342524 *Jul 25, 2011Jan 1, 2013Winsor CorporationVirtual game
US8413987Jul 25, 2011Apr 9, 2013Winsor ConceptsVirtual gaming machine
US20110151962 *Mar 27, 2008Jun 23, 2011Winsor ConceptsVirtual game
US20110309576 *Jul 25, 2011Dec 22, 2011Winsor ConceptsVirtual Game
WO2005021116A2 *Aug 27, 2004Mar 10, 2005Reynolds W GuyerMethod for playing a game
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/02