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Publication numberUS8180319 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 12/029,951
Publication dateMay 15, 2012
Filing dateFeb 12, 2008
Priority dateFeb 12, 2007
Also published asCA2677814A1, CN101663593A, CN101663593B, EP2122381A1, EP2122381A4, EP2122381B1, US20080194227, WO2008100506A1, WO2008100506A8
Publication number029951, 12029951, US 8180319 B2, US 8180319B2, US-B2-8180319, US8180319 B2, US8180319B2
InventorsJames Elwood NALLEY, Christopher Daniel Buehler
Original AssigneeTrueposition, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remotely activatable locator system and method
US 8180319 B2
Abstract
A method for locating an entity attached to a locator device. The method comprises of receiving, at the locator device, a message over a cellular network; and responsive to receiving the message, automatically initiating a call over the cellular network to enable a party answering the call to determine a location of the locator device.
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Claims(14)
1. A method for locating an entity attached to a locator device, wherein the locator device is configured to remain in a standby state and to enter an active state only upon receiving an activation message, wherein during the standby state the locator device is able to communicate with a cellular network only over a control channel of the cellular network while maintaining a low power state, and wherein during the active state the locator device initiates a voice channel call to enable locating the entity attached to the locator device, the method comprising:
receiving, at the locator device, an activation message over a control channel of the cellular network;
responsive to receiving the activation message, automatically authenticating the activation message and, upon authentication of the activation message, determining whether emergency activation has been authorized;
if emergency activation has not been authorized, performing at least one of performing an over the air update of the locator device, and initiating the voice channel call, over a voice channel of the cellular network, by calling a predetermined number;
if emergency activation has been authorized, automatically initiating the voice channel call over the voice channel of the cellular network, wherein the voice channel call is a public assistance or emergency call, and wherein the voice channel call enables location of the locator device by a radiolocation system;
sending a confirmation message to a party that transmitted the activation message confirming that the voice channel call has been placed by the locator device; and
determining that the voice channel call has been answered, and in response to determining that the voice channel call has been answered, transmitting a predetermined data stream providing information about the entity.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
playing a prerecorded audible message providing information about the entity in response to determining that the call has been answered.
3. The method of claim 1, further comprising transmitting a status of the locator device to an operation center over the control channel of the cellular network.
4. The method of claim 1, further comprising initiating, by the locator device, a multiparty call between the party answering the voice channel call and a party that transmitted the activation message.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the voice channel call is placed to a public safety answering point.
6. The method of claim 1, further comprising playing a prerecorded audible message providing contact information associated with a party that transmitted the activation message.
7. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
responsive to a status indicating that a power source of the locator device is low, transmitting a remote notification to a party that the power source is low.
8. A locator device comprising:
an electronic module configured to perform the following process:
receiving, at the locator device, an activation message over a control channel of a cellular network;
responsive to receiving the activation message, automatically authenticating the activation message and, upon authentication of the activation message, determining whether emergency activation has been authorized;
if emergency activation has not been authorized, performing at least one of performing an over the air update of the locator device, and initiating a voice channel call, over a voice channel of the cellular network, by calling a predetermined number;
if emergency activation has been authorized, automatically initiating a voice channel call over the voice channel of the cellular network, wherein the voice channel call is a public assistance or emergency call, and wherein the voice channel call enables location of the locator device by a radiolocation system; and
sending a confirmation message to a party that transmitted the activation message confirming that the voice channel call has been placed by the locator device;
wherein the locator device is configured to remain in a standby state and to enter an active state only upon receiving a properly authenticated activation message; and
wherein during the standby state the locator device is able to communicate with the cellular network only over the control channel of cellular network while maintaining a low power state.
9. The locator device of claim 8, further comprising:
memory for storing a prerecorded audible message; and
a processor for playing the prerecorded audible message in response to determining that the call has been answered.
10. The locator device of claim 8, further comprising memory for storing identifying information of a subscriber associated with the locator device.
11. The locator device of claim 8, further comprising a processor for initiating a multiparty call between a party answering the voice channel call and the party that transmitted the activation message.
12. The locator device of claim 8 disguised as an accessory item.
13. The locator device of claim 8, further comprising a global positioning system component.
14. The locator device of claim 8, further comprising a processor for returning the device to lower power inactive mode.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATIONS

This patent application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/889,426, filed Feb. 12, 2007, the teachings and disclosure of which are hereby incorporated in their entireties by reference thereto.

BACKGROUND

Personal tracking devices have been found to be useful in locating lost objects and, more importantly, missing persons. Such tracking devices typically use a network of Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) in low earth orbit that broadcast precise timing signals from on-board atomic clocks. Using triangulation formulas, a device that picks up signals from several satellites simultaneously can determine its position in global coordinates, namely latitude and longitude. Thus, an object and/or person carrying the GPS device may be located provided the appropriate equipment and trained personnel are available for determining the location of the GPS device. However, GPS signals, like any other satellite signal, are prone to numerous interferences including atmospheric disturbances, such as solar flares and naturally occurring geomagnetic storms. In addition, man-made interference can also disrupt, or jam, GPS signals. Further, anything that can block sunlight can block GPS signals. This raises the question of whether or not GPS is reliable in locating a missing and wandering person who may be in, or next to, a building, under a tree, in the brush, under a bridge, in an urban environment, in a vehicle or even a person who has fallen down and has their GPS unit covered by their own body.

Other known tracking devices use radio signal emitting transmitters. However, these types of tracking devices require an expensive receiver device in the area to receive and track the emitted radio signal. Thus, without the appropriate receiving device in the area and/or trained personnel capable of operating the receivers, these tracking devices would be useless for locating lost objects and/or missing persons.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a more complete understanding of the present application, the objects and advantages thereof, reference is now made to the following descriptions taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating an embodiment of a locator device;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an embodiment of a locator system for locating an entity attached to the locator device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a flow diagram illustrating an embodiment of a method for locating an entity attached to the locator device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sequence diagram illustrating an embodiment of the communication paths of the locator device of FIG. 1 in standby mode;

FIG. 5 is a sequence diagram illustrating an embodiment of the communication paths of the locator device of FIG. 1 in active emergency mode; and

FIG. 6 is a sequence diagram illustrating an embodiment of the communication paths of the tracking device of FIG. 1 in non-emergency mode.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating an embodiment of a remotely activatable tracking device 100. Device 100 comprises an electronic module 102 for transmitting and receiving messages over a cellular network. In some embodiments, electronic module 102 may be integrated with an onboard identity module 104. Electronic module 102 comprises processor 101 and memory 103 for processing and storing data. Processor 101 may be one or more microprocessors on electronic device 102. Device 100 further comprises a power source 106 and an antenna 108. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, electronic module 102, onboard identity module 104, power source 106, and antenna 108 are enclosed within an upper housing 110 and a lower housing 112.

Device 100 may be registered onto and maintain low-level (or standby) connectivity to a cellular network 114. Cellular network 114 is a network made up of a number of radio cells each served by a fixed transmitter, known as a base station. In some embodiments, cellular network 114 supports the Global System for Mobile communications (GSM) standard for mobile communications. GSM networks operate in four different frequency ranges (850/90011800/1900 MHz frequency bands). However, most GSM networks operate in the 900 MHz or 1800 MHz bands.

In some embodiments, electronic module 102 may either be a dual-band GSM module supporting the 900 and 1800 MHz bands or may be a quad-band GSM module supporting all GMS frequency ranges. In addition, electronic module 102 may support data packet reception/transmission capabilities such as, but not limited to, by means of General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) is a Mobile Data Service providing data rates from 56 up to 114 Kbps. GPRS may be used for services such as Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) access, Short Message Service (SMS), Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS), and for Internet communication services such as email and World Wide Web access. For example, SMS messages, typically referred to as text messaging, may be sent using GPRS and/or over control channels of cellular network 114. A control channel is a channel that allows data to be transmitted between a cellular device, such as device 100, and other devices using cellular network 114 infrastructures, such as a cell tower, even when device 100 is not communicating over a voice channel. Communicating over the control channel enables cellular network 114 to determine which network cell device 100 is currently in. In addition, the control channel may be used to send a message to a cellular device to inform the cellular device of an incoming call and to provide a pair of voice channel frequencies to use for the call. A voice channel is a communication channel having sufficient bandwidth to carry voice frequencies. In some embodiments, device 100 may support other standards for mobile communication and/or data packet transmission.

In some embodiments, electronic module 102 may include an embedded software environment that enables the development of essential capabilities such as mobile connectivity, location awareness, and device intelligence. For example, electronic module 102 may be used to monitor the status of device 100 and provide remote updates to device 100 over the control or traffic channels of cellular network 114. In addition, electronic module 102 may contain resident software that authenticates incoming messages. Device 100 enters an active state only upon receiving a properly authenticated remote activation message. During active state, device 100 initiates a method for locating the person or entity that is currently wearing or carrying device 100 as will be further described below. An entity as referenced herein may be a person, animal, or inanimate object. Further, electronic module 102 may provide functionality for initiating a multiparty call between different parties to facilitate locating the missing entity.

Onboard identity module 104 securely stores network-specific information such as, but not limited to, a service-subscriber key used to authenticate and identify a subscriber associated with device 100. A subscriber as referenced herein refers to a person or business entity to which device 100 is associated with. For example, the subscriber may be the person wearing or carrying device 100 or may be the person or entity responsible for the care of the person wearing or carrying device 100. In addition, device 100 may store a prerecorded audible message in memory located on electronic module 102 or on onboard identity module 104. The prerecorded audible message may be played to provide additional information as part of the method for locating the missing person or entity attached to device 100. For example, the prerecorded audible message may provide biographic data about the missing entity such as, but not limited to, name, age, height, weight, race, and medical history such as, but not limited to, pharmaceutical allergies. In addition, the prerecorded audible message may provide contact information of a party that initiated the activation of the device 100.

Device 100 is powered by power source 106. Power source 106 may include one or more rechargeable and/or disposable batteries. In some embodiments, power source 106 may be at least one or a combination of a lithium ion type battery, a lithium polymer battery, a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) type battery and/or other types of electrochemical cells. In some embodiments, power source 106 may also incorporate solar power energy or be kinetic-energy based.

Antenna 108 is a transducer designed to transmit or receive electromagnetic waves. In other words, antenna 108 converts electromagnetic waves into electrical currents and vice versa. Device 100 uses antenna 108 to transmit and receive radio frequency signals from cellular network 114. In some embodiments, antenna 108 may be a microstrip patch antenna. A microstrip patch antenna is a narrowband, wide-beam antenna fabricated by etching the antenna element pattern in metal trace bonded to an insulating dielectric substrate with a continuous metal layer bonded to the opposite side of the substrate which forms a groundplane.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, device 100 comprises upper housing 110 and lower housing 112 to enclose the internal components of device 100. However, it should be understood that the components of device 100 may be enclosed by any number of means. In some embodiments, device 100 may be configured with minimal external connections and indicators in order to maintain a small and discrete physical profile. In some embodiments, device 100 may include electronic connections for the recharging of power source 106. In addition, in some embodiments, device 100 may have an indicator such as, but not limited to, an LED light or a graphical display indicating an approximate remaining battery charge.

In some embodiments, device 100 may be splash-proof or water-proof. In order to maintain the discreteness of device 100, in some embodiments, device 100 may be disguised as an accessory item. For example, the accessory item may include, but is not limited to, incorporating device 100 as part of a necklace, a bracelet, and/or as a lapel pin to enable a user to wear device 100 or carry device 100 on the user's person. Further, in some embodiments, device 100 may include of a global positioning system component 116. Thus, enabling device 100 to be located using multiple location techniques.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an embodiment of a locator system 200 for locating an entity 202 attached to and/or associated with device 100. A responsible requesting party 204 reports entity 202 as missing to operation center 206. Operation center 206 is a place from which trained personnel may access information related to device 100 and communicate with device 100 over cellular network 114. Operation center 206 retrieves information regarding entity 202, responsible requesting party 204, and device 100 from subscriber database 208. Subscriber database 208 may be any type of data store including, but not limited to, a relational database. Subscriber database 208 may be a local database at operation center 206 or may be remotely located. Operation center 206 verifies the identity of responsible requesting party 204 using the data retrieved from subscriber database 208. For example, responsible requesting party 204 may have to provide a personal identification number (PIN) matching an authorization PIN stored in subscriber database 208. Upon proper verification, operation center 206 determines a particular device 100 associated with entity 202 and transmits a message over a communication gateway 210 to the particular device 100. Communication gateway 210 allows for the sending and receiving of messages to or from devices, such as, but not limited to, device 100, and is used to provide network connectivity to third parties. Communication gateway 210 transmits the message to cellular network 114 where it is received by a mobile network operator (MNO) 212.

Mobile network operator 212, also known as a wireless service provider, is a company that provides services for cellular subscribers. In some embodiments, mobile network operator 212 is a provider of a Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) network. Mobile network operator 212 forwards the message to a Mobile Switching Center (MSC) 214. Mobile Switching Center 214 is a telephone exchange which provides circuit-switched calling, mobility management, and GSM services to the cellular devices roaming within the area that it serves. Mobile Switching Center 214 communicates with Base Station Subsystem (BSS) 216. Base Station Subsystem 216 is the section of cellular network 114 responsible for handling traffic and signaling between a cellular device and a network switching subsystem. Base Station Subsystem 216 carries out transcoding of speech channels, allocation of radio channels to mobile phones, paging, quality management of transmission and reception over the air interface and many other tasks related to the radio network. Mobile Switching Center 214 also communicates with Gateway Mobile Location Centre (GMLC) 218 to provide location services to Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) 220. Public Safety Answering Point 220 is an agency, typically county or city controlled, responsible for answering public assistance or emergency calls, such as 9-1-1 calls for emergency assistance from police, fire, and ambulance services. Emergency dispatchers working at Public Safety Answering Point 220 are able to determine the location of device 100 using some form of radiolocation, as further described below, and information provided by Gateway Mobile Location Centre (GMLC) 218. In some embodiments, such as in the case of non-emergency calls, Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) 220 may not be contacted. Instead, a predetermined number such as, but not limited to, a number associated with operation center 206 or responsible requesting party 204 may be contacted.

With reference now to FIG. 3, a flow diagram 300 is presented illustrating an embodiment of a method for locating an entity attached to and/or associated with device 100. The method in FIG. 3 may be implemented by a microprocessor on a component of device 100 such as, but not limited to, electronic module 102. The method begins by initiating boot-up of device 100 (block 302). Part of the process of initiating boot-up of device 100 at block 302 includes provisioning device 100 with the settings with which to access various services such as Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) or Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS). WAP is an open international standard for applications that use wireless communication such as enabling access to the Internet from a cellular device. Multimedia Messaging Service is a standard that allows sending text messages such as in Short Message Service (SMS) messages in addition to multimedia objects. In addition, device 100 performs a registration process with the cellular network 114 to gain access to and/or use cellular network 114. Once device 100 completes block 302, device 100 enters into a standby mode.

In standby mode, device 100 is able to communicate with cellular network 114 over the control channels of cellular network 114 while maintaining a low power state. In some embodiments, device 100 performs periodic location updates and status checks including, but not limited to, checking the status of power source 106 (block 304). If device 100 detects an error and/or if power source 106 is low (block 306), device 100 may send a notification message over the control channels of cellular network 114 to operation center 206 and/or to responsible requesting party 204 (block 308). In some embodiments, to conserver power consumption of device 100, the periodic checks are only performed after receiving a message from operation center 206 containing a status request/command. In this case, even if the device is operating properly, the status of device 100 may be reported back to operation center 206.

Device 100 may also receive activation messages while in standby mode. An activation message may be a specific signal activating device 100 when received and/or may contain a command when executed activates device 100. Upon receiving an activation message, device 100 determines if the received activation message is valid (block 310). In some embodiments, the activation message may be encrypted and requires proper decryption before device 100 can enter an active state. The encryption algorithm/method may include asymmetric/symmetric methods of cryptography or any other method of cryptography. In some embodiments, device 100 may authenticate the activation message and/or the locationaine that transmitted the activation message. By securing the activation message, device 100 cannot errantly enter an active state by receiving an unauthorized activation message. Upon properly authenticating a received activation message, device 100 determines if emergency activation is authorized (block 312).

If an emergency activation authorization has been received, device 100 automatically initiates an e911 call over a voice channel of cellular network 114 to a Public Safety Answering Point 220 (block 314). An emergency activation authorization may be a specific signal indicating to device 100 to initiate the emergency process when received and/or may contain a command when executed activates the emergency process of device 100. In some embodiments, device 100 may automatically initiate an e911 call over a control/data channel of cellular network 114 to a Public Safety Answering Point 220 (block 314). For example, Public Safety Answering Point 220 may be equipped to receive text messages and/or videos requesting assistance. In these embodiments, device 100 may transmit a stored predetermined data stream to Public Safety Answering Point 220 that provides information about the entity that is missing and/or contact information to the party that initiated the activation of device 100. Enhanced 911 (e911) service is a North American Telephone Network (NANP) feature of the 911 emergency-calling system that automatically associates a physical address with the calling party's telephone number as required by the Wireless Communications and Public Safety Act of 1999. In the case of a land-line, this may be performed using a telephone directory. In the case of a mobile device, such as device 100, this may be performed by, but not limited to, using some form of radiolocation. Radiolocation uses base stations of cellular network 114 to determine the location of device 100. Most often, this is done through triangulation between radio towers. The location of device 100 can be determined several ways including, but not limited to, Angle of Arrival (AOA), Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA), and/or by using location signatures. Angle of Arrival (AOA) requires at least two towers, locating the caller at the point where the lines along the angles from each tower intersect. Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) is similar to GPS using multilateration, except that it is the networks that determine the time difference and therefore distance from each tower. Location signature uses “fingerprinting” to store and recall patterns (such as multipath) which mobile phone signals are known to exhibit at different locations in each cell.

In some embodiments, device 100 plays a prerecorded audible message in response to determining that the e911 call has been answered by Public Safety Answering Point 220. In addition, in some embodiments, device 100 may send a confirmation message to a party, such as, but not limited to, operation center 206, that transmitted the activation command confirming that the call had been placed and answered. Device 100 maintains the connection with Public Safety Answering Point 220 until a deactivation message is received from operation center 206 (block 316). In some embodiments, the deactivation message may be transmitted by a party at Public Safety Answering Point 220 as well as by the operation center 206. Deactivation may occur to conserver power source 106 of device 100. The deactivation message may also require authenticating. Upon receiving and/or authenticating the deactivation message, device 100 returns to standby mode (block 318). Device 100 may be reactivated once emergency personnel are in the vicinity of device 100. Further, in some embodiments, device 100 may automatically return to standby mode to conserve power after a predetermined time or event such as, but not limited to, when a cellular signal is lost. In this instance, device 100 may automatically reinitiate an e911 call after a signal is detected.

If at block 312 a non-emergency authorization is received, device 100 determines if an update command was received to perform over-the-air (OTA) programming (block 320). OTA programming is a method of distributing new software/firmware updates to cellular devices having the settings for accessing services such as WAP or MMS. If an update command was received, device 100 performs OTA updates (block 322). OTA updates functionality enables flexible adaptation of device 100 features for changing conditions. For example, device 100 may initially be configured for emergency E911 call origination only, but in the future the subscriber may wish to allow for non-emergency geo-location services. This change of software capabilities may be performed wirelessly using OTA programming under the direction of the operation center 206.

If at block 320 an update command was not received, device 100 performs non-emergency functionality by initiating a call over a voice channel of cellular network 114 to a predetermined number such as operation center 206 (block 322). For example, this may occur in the case of responsible requesting party 204 reporting to operation center 206 that device 100 is attached to a missing pet. Device 100 maintains the connection until a deactivation message is received (block 316). Device 100 then returns to standby mode (block 318).

FIG. 4 is a sequence diagram 400 illustrating an embodiment of the communication paths between operation center 206 and device 100 in standby mode. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 4, three types of messages/commands are transmitted over a control/messaging channel 408 of cellular network 114. Cellular network 114 also includes traffic (voice/data) channels, such as traffic (voice/data) channel 409.

During message exchange 402, operation center 206 transmits a health check request 410 to device 100. Device 100 responds with a health check response 412. Operation center 206 may then transmit a response, a health check acknowledgement 414, acknowledging receipt of health check response 412.

In message exchange 404, during a periodic check, as described above, device 100 may determine that power source 106 is low. In response, device 100 may initiate an alarm message 420 notifying operation center 206 that power source 106 is low. In some embodiments, operation center 206 may send an alarm message acknowledgement 422 in response to receiving alarm message 420. Operation center 206 may then notify responsible requesting party 204 that device 100 requires power source 106 to be recharged and/or replaced. In some embodiments, device 100 may directly transmit alarm message 420 to notify a subscriber such as responsible requesting party 204 that power source 106 is low. In addition, device 100 may automatically activate an indicator on device 100 such as an LED light to indicate power source 106 is low. In some embodiments, operation center 206 may remotely activate the indicator on device 100.

During message exchange 406, operation center 206 may transmit an activation command 430. Device 100 may then proceed as described in the embodiments illustrated in FIG. 3. In addition, device 100 may send an activation command acknowledgement 432 in response to receiving activation command 430.

FIG. 5 is a sequence diagram 500 illustrating an embodiment of the communication paths of device 100 in active emergency mode. In message exchange 502, after receiving and verifying activation command 430 as authorizing emergency action, device 100 initiates a 911 call 510 over traffic (voice/data) channel 409 to Public Safety Answering Point 220. Public Safety Answering Point 220 determines the location of device 100 based on the location from which the call was initiated within cellular network 114. Device 100 then transmits over control/messaging channel 408 a message 512 indicating that a 911 call has been initiated. Once device 100 determines that the 911 call has been terminated, device 100 transmits over control/messaging channel 408 a message 514 indicating that the 911 call has been terminated. In some embodiments, device 100 may initiate a connection between operation center 206 and Public Safety Answering Point 220.

In some embodiments, operation center 206 may deactivate device 100 and return device 100 to standby mode to conserver power source 106. For example, during message exchange 504, operation center 206 may send device 100 a de-activation command 520 over control/messaging channel 408. Device 100 may return a de-activation command acknowledgement 522 in response to either receiving de-activation command 520 and/or in response to actually de-activating device 100.

FIG. 6 is a sequence diagram 600 illustrating an embodiment of the communication paths between operation center 206 and device 100 in active non-emergency mode. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6 during message exchange 602, device 100 transmits telematic data 610 to operation center 206 over traffic (voice/data) channel 409. Telematic data 610 is any data that is sent, received, and/or stored via telecommunication devices. Telematic data 610 may be used by operation center 206 to determine the location of and to provide updates to device 100 in non-emergency situations. Operation center 206 may return an acknowledgement 612 that telematic data 610 has been received over control/messaging channel 408.

In addition, during message exchange 604, operation center 206 may update device 100 in real time such as, but not limited to, changing the default parameters of device 100 over traffic (voice/data) channel 409. For example, operation center 206 may transmit telematic update data 614 to change the default activation time parameter to keep device 100 activated for a longer or shorter period of time during an emergency situation and/or update the prerecorded audible message or the predetermined data stream. Device 100 may transmit an update acknowledgment 616 in response to performing the received updates.

During message exchange 606, operation center 206 may send device 100 a de-activation command 620 over controvmessaging channel 408. Device 100 may return a de-activation command acknowledgement 622 in response to either receiving de-activation command 620 and/or in response to actually de-activating device 100.

Accordingly, the illustrative embodiments provide a locator system 200 for assisting emergency personnel in locating an entity, such as a missing person, carrying or wearing a locator device such as device 100. Locator system 200 provides a more reliable method and apparatus for locating a missing entity than other locating methods by overcoming the problems associated with other locating methods as described above. For example, the entity attached to device 100 is not required to perform any action to activate device 100, which is crucially important in the case of a confused elderly person or a minor child. In addition, the illustrative embodiments may be implemented in the current e911 system without requiring the added costs associated with purchasing special tracking equipment and/or requiring personnel training. Further, the illustrative embodiments provide a method and apparatus for locating an entity in non-emergency situations and for updating device 100 wirelessly over cellular network 114.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification455/404.2, 455/404.1, 455/456.1
International ClassificationH04M11/04, H04W64/00, H04W76/02
Cooperative ClassificationH04W64/00, H04W76/02
European ClassificationH04W64/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 27, 2012ASAssignment
Effective date: 20080103
Owner name: JJCK LLC (D/B/A EMFINDERS), TEXAS
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Feb 25, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: JJCK, LLC., TEXAS
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