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Publication numberUS822060 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 29, 1906
Filing dateSep 27, 1905
Priority dateSep 27, 1905
Publication numberUS 822060 A, US 822060A, US-A-822060, US822060 A, US822060A
InventorsJames J Lawler
Original AssigneeWinsted Silk Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Embroidery-silk holder.
US 822060 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED MAY 29, 1906."

J. 'J. LAWLER. EMBROIDERY SILK HOLDER.

APPLIOA TION FILED SEPT. 27, 1005.

W/TNESSES:

/NVENTOR Jc zmea ZZczwZer ATTQHN I UNITED STATES PATENT oEEioE.

JAMES J. LAWLER, OF WINSTED, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO WINSTED SILK COMPANY, OF WEST WINSTED, CONNECTICUT.

EMBROIDERY-SILK HOLDER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented May 29, 1906.

Application filed September 27,1905. Serial No. 280,327.

To all whowt it may concern.-

Be it known that I, JAMES J. LAWLER, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Winsted, in the county of Litchfield and State of Connecticut, have invented a new and Improved Embroidery-Silk Holder, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

The object of the invention is to provide a new and improved embroidery-silk holder arranged to securely hold a skein of embroiderysilk and to allow convenient removal of a single thread from the skein without danger of tangling the threads forming the skein.

The invention consists of novel features and parts and combinations of the same, as will be more particularly described hereinafter and then pointed out in the claim.

Referenceis to be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, .in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all theviews.

Figure 1 is a face view of the improvement with a skein of embroidery-silk held in position. Fig. 2 is a like view of the same, illustrating the removal of a single thread from the skein; and Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the improvement.

The embroidery-silk holder is in the form of a strip A made of cardboard or other suitable material, and the upper end of the strip A is provided at its middle with an aperture B, to which leads a narrow slot C from the top edge of the strip A. In the lower end of the strip A is arranged a pair of apertures D and D, from which lead narrow slots E ,and E to the lower edge of the strip A, the said slots E and E being inclined toward each other or converging from the apertures D and D to the lower edge of the strip A. The two apertures D and D are spaced a suitable distance apart and arranged in a transverse direction, as plainly illustrated in Fig. 3.

The skein F of embroidery-silk is braided, and its middle portion is first engaged with the apertures D and D by passing the skein through the narrow slots E and E to reach the apertures D and D and to form a loop F, extending from one aperture D to the other aperture D. The skein is now passed up the back of the strip A and then through the narrow slot C into the aperture B, and then the skein isfpassed down at the front of the strip A and the separated ends are passed through i the slots E and E to reach the apertures D and D, the terminals of the ends appearing upon the rear of the strip A. By the arrangement described the skein F is securely held in a properly-stretched position on the strip A.

When it is desired to remove a single thread from the skein F, then the ends of the skein are first disconnected from the apertures D and D by passing the ends through the slots E and E, and then the operator takes hold of the loop F and pulls the same outward a distance of, say, two inches, and

then a single thread is taken hold of at theloop and this thread is pulled outward to disconnect or remove the single thread from the skein, as indicated in Fig. 2. After the single thread has been removed the ends of the skein are pulled on to draw the loop F back to its position shown in Fig. 1, and then the ends of the skein are reintroduced into the apertures D and D by way of the slots E and E, as before explained and shown in Fi 1.

The device described is very simple and durable in construction, can be cheaply manufactured, and securely holds the skein in position to prevent entangling of the threads, the arrangement also permitting a convenient removal of a single thread from the skein whenever it is desired to do so.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by. Letters Patent An embroidery-silk holder,comprising a strip of cardboard or the like, provided at one end with an aperture having a slot leading therefrom to the edge of the strip, and having at the other end a pair of spaced apertures provided with slots leading therefrom to the adjacent edge of the end of the strip, said slots converging toward the end of the strip whereby to facilitate the placing of a loop of silk within the spaced apertures.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

JAMES J. LAWLER.

Witnesses:

ERNEST G. BURDETT, ALIsoN E. PALMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2823610 *Jan 23, 1956Feb 18, 1958Olin MathiesonBlasting cap packages
US4494653 *Apr 18, 1984Jan 22, 1985Codman & ShurtleffContainer for surgical patties
US4889230 *Feb 17, 1989Dec 26, 1989Deroyal IndustriesPackage of strung medical sponges
US5207703 *Nov 21, 1990May 4, 1993Jain Krishna MSuture organizer
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/04