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Publication numberUS835120 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1906
Filing dateMay 29, 1905
Priority dateMay 29, 1905
Publication numberUS 835120 A, US 835120A, US-A-835120, US835120 A, US835120A
InventorsHenry Livingstone Sulman, Hugh Fitzalis Kirkpatrick-Picard, John Ballot
Original AssigneeHenry Livingstone Sulman, Hugh Fitzalis Kirkpatrick-Picard, John Ballot
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ore concentration.
US 835120 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Y JJ' ff N.8B5,12o v Y PATBNTBD Nov. 6, 1906.

H. I.. sUIJsiIAmH.A P. KI/RKPATRIQg-PI'CARD a J'. BJALLOT.

' NONE CONCENTRATION. i

' ATP'LIOATION FILED MAY 29, 1806.

' Y 2 sums-slum 1.

lum H No. 835,120. l 'PATENTED Nov, 6, 190e.

' H. L. SULMAN, H. F. KIRKPATRIGK-PIQARD & J. BALLOT.

ORB CONCENTRATION. 1

APPLICATION FILED HAY 28, 1905.

2 SHEETS-sunnin.

zoh

WU'pNrrijcDv s'rArEs PATENT oFFICE.

AHENRY LIVINGSTONE SULMAN, HUGHNFITZALIS KIRKPATRICK-PICARD, AND (JOHN BALLOT, OF LONDON` ENGLAND.

ORE GONCENTRATIQN.

l ySpecication of Letters Patent.

' 'Patented Nov. 6, 1906.

Application ld lily 29, 1905'. Serial No. 282.689.

To all, whom it may concern:

. Be it known that we, HENRY LIVINGSTONE SULMAN. HUGH FrrzALIs KmxrA'rRIoK-PIC- ARD, and JOHN BALLOT, subjects of the King of' England, residing in London, E land, have invented certain new and usefu Improvements in Cre Concentration, of which the following is a specification.'

This invention relates to improvements in the concentration of ores, the object being. to vsep arate metalliferous matter, graphite, and the like from gangue by means of oils, fatt acids,. or other substances which have a pre erential affinity for -metalliferous matter over gangue.

In 'he process described vin the previous United States patent, No. 777,273, ranted to A. E. Cattermole, an'amount of oil varying from four per cent. to six per cent. of the weight of metalliferousl matter present is agitated with an ore pulp, so as to form granules which can be separated from the gan In the previous United States patent, o. 777 ,274, granted to 'A.. E. Cattermole and others, a similar method of separation is employed, oleic acid being produced im. situ in the ore pulp.

' We have found that if the proportion of oily substance be considerably reduced-say to a fraction of one per cent. on the oregranulation ceases to take place, and after vigorous'agitation there is a tendency for a part of the oil-coated metalliferous matter to rise to the surface of the pulp in the form of-a froth or scum. This tendency is dependenton anumber of factors. Thus the water in which the oiling is-efi'ec'ted is preferably slightly acidified by adding, say, a fraction of one per cent. up to one per cent. of sulfuric acid or other mineral acid or acid salt,

revent the effect of this acidity being to gangue from being coated with oi y substance, or, in other words, to render the selective action of the oil more marked; v,but it is to be understood that .the object' of using acid in the pulp according to this invention is not to bring about the generation of gas for the purpose of flotation thereby, and the proportion of acid used is insuficient to cause chemical action on the metalliferous minerals present. Again, we have discovered that the tendencyY for the oily substance to disseminate through the pulp and the ralarger particles have less tendenc idity with which the metalliferous matter ecomes coated is increased if the pulp is -warrned. The formation of froth is assisted by the fine pulverization of the-ore, and we find that slime mineral mostreadily generates scum and rises to 'the surface, while to bei included in the froth. The proportion of mineral which fioats in the form of froth varies considerably with different ores and with different oily substances, and before utilizing the facts above mentioned in the concentration of any particular ore asimple preliminary test 'is vnecessary to determine which oily.

substance yields the proportion of froth or scum desired. f

The following is an example of the application of this invention'to the'concentratl'on of a particular ore. An ore .containing ferruous blende, galeria, and gangue consisting of quartz, rhod'onite, and garnet is finely powdered and mixed with Water containing a fraction of one per cent. or` up tio-one per cent. of a mineral acid or acid salt, conveniently sulfuric acid or mine 'or other waters containi ferrie sulfate. very smal proportion of oleic acid, (say from 0.02) per cent to 0.5 per cent on the weight of ore. 40 centigrade and is briskly agitated in a cone mixer or the like, as in the processes previously cited, for about two and one-half to ten minutes, until the oleic acid has been brought into eiiicient contact with all the mineral particles in the pulp. When agitation is stopped, a large roportion of the mineralv present rises to t e surface inthe form Aof a froth or scum which has derived its power of flotation mainly from the inclusion of air-bubbles introduced inte the mass b the agitation, such bubblesor air-.films adhering on] to the mineral particles which are coatedY with oleic acid. IThe minimum amount of oleic acid which can be used to effect-the,flotation of the mineral in the form of froth 'may be under 0.1 per cent. of the ore; but this proportion has been found suitable and economical.

If the ore were crushed to ninety mesh to the linear inch, (half of which ore will pass- The mixture `is warmed, say, to 30 to To this is added-a l i om the pulp by spitzkast, upcast, skimming,

draining, or otherwise. After subsidence the oil-coated metalliferous matter removed as froth is separated from any liquid'which may have accompanied it and treated with a dilute solution of caustic alkali, which removes -the oleic acid in the form of a solution of soap.

I fdesired, the oleic acid used in the`iirst instance may'be produced 'Ln situ in the pulp by decomposing a dilute 'soap solution with mineral acid, as described in the revious' patent, No. 777,274, cited above. he oleic acid or other fatty'acid forming the coating onthe 'metalliferous-matter Qwhich produces the froth ma ive rise to insoluble" soaps on the surface ofY lle metalliferous matter if soluble lime, iron, or other salts are present in small quantity durin the roducton or on the breaki down o the oth with alkali. Such insolale soaps are difficult to remove and are capable of adhering to air and causing otation, much the same as the fatty acids do.

The metalliferous matter'A which did not form art of the froth (generally the' larger pai-tic es) vremains in admixture with the gangue in the pulp. LTO recover this, the pulp is distributed m a thin layer on a shaking-table, convex buddle, or the like, whereon the mineral is -exposed to a free-air sur-Y I face,which exposure may be increased by the Serial ap lica'tion of air-blast or air-'ets or the like an thereafter brou ht onto t e edge or surface of liquid,wherey the metalliferous matter floats and is separated from the angue, which sinks, as described in the spec' cation of our Nprevious United States application o. 246,637, Yfiled February 20, 1905. The proportion of mineral recovered in the froth and that recovered b may be considerably varie but, generally speaking, the froth will separate the' slime mineral while the larger particles are recovered by the latter method. In the. accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a diagram in perspective illustrating one form of apparatus suitablefor carrying this invention into practice, and F ig. 2 represents in perspective an ap aratus for carrying out a secondary ste in t e process.

Referring to which there may be any number in series) is provided with a rotatable stirrer B. Crushed ore is fed from a ho per C into the vessel by a band- D. A pipe it, controlled by a tap E', delivers circuit-water to the vessel,- and oleic acid o other oil is introduced through the ratus.

pipe F and tap F. The outer cock'G from the vessel A. communicates through a swanneckpipe H with the froth separating appatus A to the spitz asten (say between and layer over` a smooth slightly-inclined plane.

table flotation the spitzkasten and ig. 1, a mixing vessel A (of.

In passin from the frothing alntra-` zontally from the Hat trough() through theinlet K. The;heavy sands and coarser particles of.mineral sink into the rst box J from which they are led to ashakmg-table, convex buddle, or the like, to be treated as above described. The middlings or medium sandsfall into the box J 2, and if they contain any mineral ma be removed for further treatment by agitation) The upcurrent of water from the taps N Nz prevents `the deposition of any slime in these boxes. The

fine' sands or gangue shines settle in the last box J5, from which -they are discharged to waste or further treatment.

The 'slime mineral in the form of froth or scum oats from the li uid and is carried by the stream over the out et I(z into a launder P and thence to a filter-Q,.where the metalliferous matter is removed from the circuitwater, which isreturned to the vessel A by a pump R. The circuit-water may be brought to the proper temperature by passing it through a heaterS, having-a burner S, before admitting the Wate` to the vessel A.

An alternative method for the recovery of any sunk oiled metalliferous matter which may be deposited in the second and third spitzkasten is as follows: The products suspended in circuit liquor are removed from laced in a vessel in which-they are submitted to an additional pressure of air or other-gas of from, say, one to two atmospheres or over. On relief of such pressure the bubbles of .air or other gas so generated throughout the mass at once sweep to the surface thereof all the metalliferous matter in the form of a froth which can be separated as before. This idea isV not claimed broadly in this case, 'but forms the subject-matter of an a plication filed by us on January 9, 1906, Serial No. 295,326.v

Referring to F' which there mayle several in series) is provided With a rotatable stil-rer b. Crushed ere or similar finely-divided mineral is fed into the vessel a. A pipe c, controlled by a tap c', delivers circuit-water'to. the vessel, and in cases where oil is used the oil is int-ro- 2, a mixing vessel a (of l duced through the pipe 1 in quantity sulie t ough the pipe az to a Y circuit-water.

, to secure by Letters Patent, is-

The operation is as follows:l The cock g is closed. Pulp is pumped into the chamber f, which contalns air or other gas, and ,the pumping is continued until the pressure in the chamberV rises to, say, fifty to'one hundredpounds per square inch. The pressure is suflicient to cause the air or other gas to be dissolved to a considerable extent inthe pulp. After the laplse of-afew minutes forthe due solution of t 'itby the pul or the liquid the cock g is opened and t e pulp is discharged into the open'spitzkasten h, Where the` liquid is 'of course under .atmospheric pressure., -The ulp e'maybe stopped during this discharge.

he Whole of the mineral to which airi b'ub- 'bles are attached-say the oiled mineral-at once rises to the 'surface as a coherent scum' or froth. A surface 'current of Water is` 'maintained inthe spitzkasten, and the floating material -is thus removed and separated from the gangue, which lremainssunlr `or suspended in the liquid.

4The nature and arrangement of the appa- -ratus used may be varied without departing from this invention. Y* What We claim as our inventlon, and desire 1.' The herein-described process of concentrating ores which' consists mixin the powdered ore with water, addingva-smal pro. portion of ah oily liquid having a preferential ailinity for m'etalliferous matter, (amounting Ito a fractionof onepe'r' cent. on the ore), ag'- tating the mixture until the oil-coated mineral matter forms in to a` froth, 'and separatthe froth'from the remainder `by flotaftrating ores which consistsin 2. Theherein-'de'scribed process of concentrating ores which consists in the powdered ore with slightly-acidified water adding a small proportion of an'oily liqui having a preferential affinity for metalliferous matter (amounting to a fraction' of one per cent. on -the ore),- agitating the mixture until the oil-coated mineral matter forms into4 a froth and 'separating the froth from the remainder by o't'ation.

3. The herein-described process ofconcenf-l trating ores which consists .in the mixmg powdered 'ore withv slightly-acidiiied Water adding 1a small proportion of Y:an `oi1y liqui having a preferential IaHinity fornietalhfer-4 vous matter (amounting'to a fractionof one e compressed air or-a portion of:

Vtion o'f one percent. of` sulfuric aci fraction of one percent. onthe ore), warming the mixture, agitatin'g the mixture' until the oil-coated mineral matter forms into a froth and .separating the froth from the remainder/by flotation.

- 4. The herein-described process of concentrating o res which consists in finely powderpowderedore with water, adding' a. smal proportion of oleic acid amounting to 0.02--05I per cent. on the ore, agitatingthe mixture until the oleic acid has been brought into efficientcontactI with the mineral and has formed arotlitherewith, and separating the 'froth from the remainder'by Ho'tation.

6. The`-h ereindescribed process of concentrating ores 'which consists in mixing `the powdered .ore with Water containing a fraction ol'l one percent; of sulfuric acid, adding a small proportion of oleic acid amounting to 0.02-..0.5 per cent. on' the ore, agitating the mixture 'until the oleic'acidhas been brought into efficient contact with the mineral and has formed a froth therewith, and separating the'froth fromthe remainderl by flotation.

7. The hereinTdescribed process of concentrating .oresv which consists in mixing the a fracadding. a small proportion of oleic acid amounting to powdered ore with water containirg 0.02415 lper' cent. on the'o're, warming the;

mixture to 30 -40 centi ade, agitating the mixture until the oleic Yacid has been brought into` efiicient 'contact with the mineral and has formed a froth therewith, and separating the froth from the remainder by 1iotation.

' 8. The herein-described process of concenely powdering the ore, mixing it with water containing a per cent. of sluricvacid, a ding suicient o cie-soap solution to produce oleic acid -amountin to 0.02-'0.5 per cent. on Vthe ore, warming t e mixture vto `30.-40

centigrade, a tating themixtune until the .tact with the mineral and has formed a froth therewith', separating the froth from the remainder by otation, filtering off the froth 'and removinthe. oleic acid therefrom by treatment Wit an alkali.

flotation, and removing the oily coating.

Vthe

IOO

rrp

. oleic acid has een-brought into efcient con-v` 9. The process of concentrating powdered A ores-'which consistsin 'separating the' vmineral from the 'gangue by-*coating the mineral with oil in water containing a small quantity 'of' from the gangue by coating the mineral with.

oil in water containing a small quantity of oil, and a. quantity of acid insufficient to cause chemical action on the metallif'erous minerals resent, agitating the mixture'to form a froth,

and separating the froth.

12. The process of concentratin powdered ore which consists in separating te numerals?- frorn gangue b y coating the minerals with oil in water containing a fraction of one per cent. of oil on the ore, agitatin the mixture to cause the oil-cotedminera to form a-f'roth,l .and separating the froth from the remainderV of the mixture.

13. The herein-described process of con,y

centrating ores which consists innely powderig-the ore, mixing it wlthwater contain 1906 Disclaimer ing less than one Iller cent. of sulfuric, acid, adding sufficient o cio-soap solution to produce oleic acid amounti 'to 0.02-0.5 per cent. on the ore, warming t e mixture to 30-'- o 40 centigrade, a 'tating the mixture until 'the oleic acid has een broughtl into efiicient contact with the i'nineral and has formed a froth with the finer -mineral, distributing the mixture on the surface of a current of Water running over columnsof water, so that the coarser minerals and sands, the finer sands o and the ,garriguel slimes successively deposit A out-While the froth is' floated `away by theV DISCLAIMER. 835,120.-'Henry Livingstone Sulmen, Hugh Fitzcl'is KirkpatricbP'icard, and Jprn Ballot, London, England CONCENTRATION. Patent dated November 6, filed March 28, 1917, bythe assignee,l Minerals Separation,

""Your petitioner, therefore, for the purpfose of complying-with the requirements of the law in such case madeand provided, and of dieclaimi'ng thoseparts of the thing patented vihich your petitioner does not choose to claimfor hold 'by virtue of id Letters' Patent isi 835,120, does hereby disclaim from chene 9', 1 0 and 11 of said Letters Patent` No. 835,120,. any process. of concentratingpowdered ores excepting` where v.the 'results obtained are the results obtained by the use of oil in a quantity mounting to a fraction of one cent. on the ore. I im am M131 1917.-] i I l I i DlsQLAl MER Bamm-Hm www Hug.-

Kifkpamd-Pmana John Ballot, London, England.- Ons Coxonmafrron. .Patent dated yNovem-y ber 6, 1906.` Disclainier filed June 27,' A1922, by thez assignee, Minerale Separa y Dlsclaimer in Lttrs PatentfNoIA 835,120.

l Your -petitioner therefore for -the purpose of assuring disclaimer of those` parts of the thing patented 4which your petitioner does not choose to claim or hold by virtue of said Letters Patent, if 'such parts have not been already fully disclim'ed, -doee hereby disclaim, as of Merch 28,1917, as well as of to-day, from velairu'ss 9, 10, and 11` of said Letters Patent No'. 835,120 any process of concentrating powdered ores excepting where-the results .obtained are the results obtained by the .use of oil in af q umutiiiyv amounting to-a fraction of one per centon the o1-e.

[Oficial Goutte July 11, 1988.]

- from the gangue by coating the mineral with.

oil in water containing a small quantity of oil, and a. quantity of acid insufficient to cause chemical action on the metallif'erous minerals resent, agitating the mixture'to form a froth,

and separating the froth.

12. The process of concentratin powdered ore which consists in separating te numerals?- frorn gangue b y coating the minerals with oil in water containing a fraction of one per cent. of oil on the ore, agitatin the mixture to cause the oil-cotedminera to form a-f'roth,l .and separating the froth from the remainderV of the mixture.

13. The herein-described process of con,y

centrating ores which consists innely powderig-the ore, mixing it wlthwater contain 1906 Disclaimer ing less than one Iller cent. of sulfuric, acid, adding sufficient o cio-soap solution to produce oleic acid amounti 'to 0.02-0.5 per cent. on the ore, warming t e mixture to 30-'- o 40 centigrade, a 'tating the mixture until 'the oleic acid has een broughtl into efiicient contact with the i'nineral and has formed a froth with the finer -mineral, distributing the mixture on the surface of a current of Water running over columnsof water, so that the coarser minerals and sands, the finer sands o and the ,garriguel slimes successively deposit A out-While the froth is' floated `away by theV DISCLAIMER. 835,120.-'Henry Livingstone Sulmen, Hugh Fitzcl'is KirkpatricbP'icard, and Jprn Ballot, London, England CONCENTRATION. Patent dated November 6, filed March 28, 1917, bythe assignee,l Minerals Separation,

""Your petitioner, therefore, for the purpfose of complying-with the requirements of the law in such case madeand provided, and of dieclaimi'ng thoseparts of the thing patented vihich your petitioner does not choose to claimfor hold 'by virtue of id Letters' Patent isi 835,120, does hereby disclaim from chene 9', 1 0 and 11 of said Letters Patent` No. 835,120,. any process. of concentratingpowdered ores excepting` where v.the 'results obtained are the results obtained by the use of oil in a quantity mounting to a fraction of one cent. on the ore. I im am M131 1917.-] i I l I i DlsQLAl MER Bamm-Hm www Hug.-

Kifkpamd-Pmana John Ballot, London, England.- Ons Coxonmafrron. .Patent dated yNovem-y ber 6, 1906.` Disclainier filed June 27,' A1922, by thez assignee, Minerale Separa y Dlsclaimer in Lttrs PatentfNoIA 835,120.

l Your -petitioner therefore for -the purpose of assuring disclaimer of those` parts of the thing patented 4which your petitioner does not choose to claim or hold by virtue of said Letters Patent, if 'such parts have not been already fully disclim'ed, -doee hereby disclaim, as of Merch 28,1917, as well as of to-day, from velairu'ss 9, 10, and 11` of said Letters Patent No'. 835,120 any process of concentrating powdered ores excepting where-the results .obtained are the results obtained by the .use of oil in af q umutiiiyv amounting to-a fraction of one per centon the o1-e.

[Oficial Goutte July 11, 1988.]

Dlsclamer In Letters Patent'No.. 835,120

DISCLAIMER. 835,120.-Henry Livingstone Salman, Hugh Fitzalis Kirkpatrick-Picard, and Jom Ballot, London, Englend Qnlj; CONCENTRATION. Patent dated November 6, 1906r Disclaimer led March 28I 1917, bylthe assignee, Minerals Separation, Limited. "Your petitioner, therefore, for the purpfose of complying with the requirements of the law in auch case made and provided, and of disclaiming those. parts of the quantity amounting to a vfraction of one per cent. on the ore.

[Qpeiaz Gum, April s, 1917.]

DISCLAIMER 835,120.-Hemy L/m'ngatone Subnum, Hugh' Fu'taahs Kirkpatrick-Pwd, and

Jom Ballot, London, England. Om; CoNomvnu'noN. Patent dated November 6, 1906. Dislainier filed June 27,' 1922, by the assignee, Minerals Separation Nrtu Corgwrat l Your petitioner therefore for the purpose of assuring disclaimer of thoseV parts of the thing patented which your petitioner does not choose to claim or hold by virtue of said Letters Patent, if such pa.rts have not been already fully dscldimed,

.does hereby disclaim, as of Mmh 2s, 1917, as well as of today, from claims 9,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2471414 *Jan 11, 1945May 31, 1949Dasher JohnConditioning minerals for film concentration
US2578040 *Sep 3, 1942Dec 11, 1951American Cyanamid CoMethod of and circuit for material modification and coolant clarification
US2595076 *Sep 19, 1949Apr 29, 1952Hudson Bay Mining & SmeltingSelective flotation of zinc
US3455451 *Aug 4, 1966Jul 15, 1969Grace W R & CoShallow cell and process for froth flotation
US3458044 *Sep 8, 1966Jul 29, 1969Exxon Research Engineering CoTreatment of coal and other minerals
US5285972 *Jul 28, 1992Feb 15, 1994Shell Research LimitedMechanical separation of lead and zinc minerals; grinding; conditioning; flotation; agglomeration
US5540836 *Jun 16, 1994Jul 30, 1996Coyne; Thomas J.Wastewater treatment system and method
US5637221 *Jul 29, 1996Jun 10, 1997Coyne; Thomas J.Removing contaminants by combination of settling, flotation, flocculation, biological conversion to produce treated wastewater which can be recycled or safely disposed of in municipal sewer
US6945407 *Nov 30, 2000Sep 20, 2005Wmc Resources Ltd.Flotation of sulphide minerals
US7028845 *Feb 28, 2002Apr 18, 2006Wmc Resources LimitedPH adjustment in the flotation of sulphide minerals
DE1257072B *Sep 28, 1966Dec 28, 1967Siteg Siebtech GmbhVorrichtung zur Flotationsaufbereitung
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB03D1/012