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Publication numberUS835579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1906
Filing dateNov 27, 1905
Priority dateNov 27, 1905
Publication numberUS 835579 A, US 835579A, US-A-835579, US835579 A, US835579A
InventorsErvin J Taylor, Edgar Taylor
Original AssigneeErvin J Taylor, Edgar Taylor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of colorably coating paper.
US 835579 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 835,579. PATPNTPD NOV. 13, 1906.

E. J. & P. TAYLOR. PROCESS OP OOLOPABLY OOATING PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 27, 1905.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

HEATEU ROL HEATED ROLL P Z o 2 I l? O Y g CY. k

lllllll COLOR Box COLOR Box Zar yzm 10.835,579. PATENTBD NOV.13, 1OO6.

` E. J. & E. TAYLOR. i

PROCESS OP OOLORABLY OOATING PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 27, 1905.

4 Sums-SHEET 2.

No. 835,579. I PATENTED NOV. 13, 1906.

E. J. & E. TAYLOR.

PROCESS 0F GOLORABLY COATING PAPER.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 27, 1905.I

4 .SHEETS-SHEET 3.

No. 835,579. PATENTED NOV. 13, 1906.

I EQJ. & E. TAYLOR.

PROCESS 0F GOLORABLY GOATINGBAPBR.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 27, 1905.

4 SHEETSSHBET 4.

owankozs,

im f7, 7 Zar" UNITED STATES PATENT oEEroE.

ERviN J. TAYLoR AND EDGAR TAYLOR, or LYNcHBURe, oHio. PROCESS OF COLORABLY COATING PAPER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 13, 1906.

Application filed November Z7, 1905. Serial No. 289,320.

To all whom/.it may concern:

Be itknown that we, ERVIN J. TAYLOR and EDGAR'TAYLOR, citizens of the United States, residing at Lynchburg, in the county of Highland and State of Ohio, new and useful Improvements in Processes of Colorably Coating Paper, of which the following is a speciiication.

This invention has relation to machines and processes for colorably coating paper formed into rolls.

It is the object of the invention to provide a machine and process which shall be capable of colorably coating on one or both sides of a roll of paperwith the same color on both sides, if both sides are coated, or with one color on one side and another color on the other side, if it is so desired.

The invention consists of the method or process of taking paper from a roll, and, if need be, stretching it to take out vany wrinkles or marks of folding, and then passing the same around a large smooth steel roll where a rotary hair-brush applies the color from a color-box to one side of the paper, when the latter is moved in contact with a series of iinishingbrushes which distribute the color thoroughly. The web is next subjected to a blast of hot air, passed in contact with a hot drying-roll, again subjected to a hot-air blast, and carried around another hot drying-roll which reverses its position and puts it in condition to have its opposite side treated in substantially the same manner.

The invention also consists in a machine for carrying out the foregoing process, as is clearly represented in the annexed drawings, forming a part of this specification, and in which Figure 1 is a sectional side elevation of so much of a machine embodying our invention as it is necessary to represent in order to fully disclose our improvements to those skilled in the art to which it relates. Fig. 2 is a diagram in plan of the main parts of the invention. Fig. 3 is a diagram of the front end, and Fig. 4 a diagram of the rear end, of the parts of the machine outlined in Fig. 2.

In the construction improvements may be embodied and by which our process may be carried into effect we may employ flanged beams 1, of steel or other material, such as is commonly used in the making of the frames for the support of the operative devices of mill machinery, and in like' manner construct journals, bearings,

have invented certain of means in which our` and supports for the same. These instrumentalities var in size and form as the require- Aments of t e machine ma vary-scarcely two orders to the machineuilder being the same as regards the particulars hereinbefore mentioned. It may, by the Way, be said that these variations come within the scope of the skilled pattern-maker and machinist.

Of the essentials herein portrayed, A may indicate the roll of virgin paperB, reeled upon a suitable rotary mandrel a, from which it is drawn and passed about a rotary roll C, which is a simple idler. From the roll C the webpasses to and about a steel roll D, which is quite smooth'and forms a solid surface for the paper to be stretched upon, so that the color-brush E may distribute the color evenly thereon. brass roll F, which receives color from the said box and distributes it on the brush E, by which, as stated, it is applied to one side of the web, all as will be understood by an inspection of the left-hand end of the machine shown in Fig.. 1.

Located in the color-box g is a An endless rubber apron b passes about the rolls H, arranged at the forward and rear ends of the machine, and the web B, of pa er, after being treated to color by the brus E, as stated, passes from the roll D beneath the belt b and above the first reciprocating-brush I, termed a scrubbing-brush, which evenly distributes the color on the web. Next the web is met by the revolving bristle brush J, which serves merely in conjunction with the belt b to pull the paper along in the machine.

The web next comes 1n contact successively v with three reciprocating hair brushes K K K, the first of which shows a ing and tension means 1n place wit it. These means constitute no part of our invention, though they are connected with each reciprocating brush and are su plemented with additional means to secure t eir perfect operation and adjustment and are quite as ordinary and common in the art as the brushes themselves. The brushes K operate to smooth the coat on the paper and to operp art of the sup ort- ICO ate with a little more energy than do the reciprocating brushes M M, which still further distribute the color-coating and smooths andpolishes it, as it were.

Next, before the web reaches the end of the machine, it is subjected to a hot blast of air, which impinges upon the coated side about as indicated by the arrow N. This blast of hot air may come from below and be supplied by a fan or blower and has a tendency to dry the paper. paper passes about a hollowsteam or hot-air heated roll O, thence through a s ace P,

it 'did below when traveling 1n the opposite direction and was treated as before described.

When the web B reaches the front of the machine, it passes about a roll R, similar to the roll D, and its uncoated side is treated to color and otherwiseoperated'upon precis/ely as before as it is drawn to the rear end of the machine and leaves the upper rubber apron l), from whence it passes on an elevator of usual construction and arrangement, where it is dried and wound into a roll.

By the process and means described both sides of the web of paper may be thoroughly and evenly colored or enameled lwith the same or different colors and the work done-in a most expeditious and economical manner. l/Vhether the paper is colored alike on both sides or different on one side from that on the other, but one machine and one operation is required.

The steps in the process of dryin are most eficient, while the ap lication of tijde coating 4is thorough and in t e end as smooth and even as is possible to have it. In reaching this end the brushes K, which act with energy, and the brushes L, which operate comparatively smoothly, play a very important part.

Next the the color-'box may be varied within the limits of mechanical skill without varying our invention.

White enamel or liquid bronze may, it will be seen, be a plied to the paper with facility and thoroug ness equal to coloring-matter.

We claimv 1. The improvement in the art of enameling or coating paper which consists in first applying the coatlng to one side of the web, spreading or distributing it evenly thereon, drying the web by subjecting the same to a current of hot air, passing it about a heated surface, subjecting. it to another current of hot air and then to a second heated surface, then applying a coating of the same or a different color or character to the other side of the web, spreading and distributing the coating thereon as before and drying it.

2. Theimprovement in the art of enameling or color-coating paper which consists in first applying the color-coating to one side of the web spreading or distributing it evenly thereon, and in the nal spreading and distribution first o erating with reater energy and latterly wit less energy, rying the web by subjecting it to a blast of hot air, passing it in contact with a heated surface, subjecting it to another current of heated air and then to a second heated roll. i

In testimony whereof We affix our signatures in presence of two witnesses.

` ERVIN J. TAYLOR.

EDGAR TAYLOR.

Witnesses:

JosEPHiNE PULSE, LEO PARKER

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6264791Oct 25, 1999Jul 24, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flash curing of fibrous webs treated with polymeric reactive compounds
US6322665Oct 25, 1999Nov 27, 2001Kimberly-Clark CorporationReactive compounds to fibrous webs
US6610174Jun 21, 2001Aug 26, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Patterned application of polymeric reactive compounds to fibrous webs
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD21H23/56