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Publication numberUS8461336 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 13/062,491
PCT numberPCT/US2009/055677
Publication dateJun 11, 2013
Filing dateSep 2, 2009
Priority dateSep 4, 2008
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS20110166104, WO2010028005A1
Publication number062491, 13062491, PCT/2009/55677, PCT/US/2009/055677, PCT/US/2009/55677, PCT/US/9/055677, PCT/US/9/55677, PCT/US2009/055677, PCT/US2009/55677, PCT/US2009055677, PCT/US200955677, PCT/US9/055677, PCT/US9/55677, PCT/US9055677, PCT/US955677, US 8461336 B2, US 8461336B2, US-B2-8461336, US8461336 B2, US8461336B2
InventorsYasheen Zhou, Yong Kang Zhang, Tsutomu Akama, Kurt Jarnagin
Original AssigneeAnacor Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boron-containing small molecules
US 8461336 B2
Abstract
This invention provides, among other things, novel compounds useful for treating inflammatory conditions, pharmaceutical compositions containing such compounds, as well as combinations of these compounds with at least one additional therapeutically effective agent.
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Claims(28)
What is claimed is:
1. A compound which has a structure according to the following formula:
wherein
R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy,
or a salt thereof.
2. A combination comprising:
(a) the compound of claim 1 or
(b) an additional therapeutic agent.
3. The combination of claim 2, wherein the additional therapeutic agent is selected from the group consisting of a beta-antagonist, a prostaglandin, an alpha2 adrenoreceptor agonist, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor and a miotic.
4. The combination of claim 3, wherein the additional therapeutic agent is a beta-antagonist, and the beta-antagonist is selected from the group consisting of timolol betaxolol hydrochloride, metipranolol and carteolol.
5. The combination of claim 3, wherein the additional therapeutic agent is a prostaglandin, and the prostaglandin is selected from the group consisting of latanoprost, unoprostone isopropyl, travoprost and bimatoprost.
6. The combination of claim 3, wherein the additional therapeutic agent is an alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist, and the alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist is selected from the group consisting of brimonidine tartrate, apraclonidine and dipivefrin.
7. The combination of claim 3, wherein the additional therapeutic agent is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, and the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor is selected from the group consisting of dorzolamide hydrochloride and brinzolamide.
8. The combination of claim 3, wherein the additional therapeutic agent is a miotic, and the miotic is selected from the group consisting of physostigmine, carbacol and piolocarpine.
9. A pharmaceutical formulation comprising:
(a) the compound of claim 1, or
(b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient.
10. The compound of claim 1, having a structure which is
11. The compound of claim 1, having a structure which is
12. The compound of claim 1, having a structure which is
13. The compound of claim 1, wherein R is F.
14. The compound of claim 1, wherein R is Cl.
15. The compound of claim 1, wherein R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy.
16. The compound of claim 1, wherein R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 alkoxy.
17. The compound of claim 1, having a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
18. The compound of claim 1, having a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
19. The compound of claim 1, having a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
20. The compound of claim 1, having a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
21. The combination of claim 2, wherein the compound of part a) has a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
22. The combination of claim 2, wherein the compound of part a) has a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
23. The combination of claim 2, wherein the compound of part a) has a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
24. The combination of claim 2, wherein the compound of part a) has a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
25. The pharmaceutical formulation of claim 9, wherein the compound of part a) has a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
26. The pharmaceutical formulation of claim 9, wherein the compound of part a) has a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
27. The pharmaceutical formulation of claim 9, wherein the compound of part a) has a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
28. The pharmaceutical formulation of claim 9, wherein the compound of part a) has a structure which is
or a salt thereof.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Pat. App. No. 61/094,406, filed Sep. 4, 2008, U.S. Provisional Pat. App. No. 61/105,990, filed Oct. 16, 2008 and U.S. Provisional Pat. App. No. 61/186,194, filed Jun. 11, 2009, each of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety for all purposes.

BACKGROUND FOR THE INVENTION

Irregular inflammation is a major component of a wide range of human diseases. People suffering from degenerative disorders often exhibit excess levels of pro-inflammatory regulators in their blood. One type of such pro-inflammatory regulators are cytokines including IL-1α, β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, IL-7, IL-9, IL-12, IL-17, IL-18, IL-23, TNF-α, LT, LIF, Oncostatin, and IFNc1α, β, γ.

A non-limiting list of common medical problems that are directly caused by inflammatory cytokines include: arthritis where inflammatory cytokines can lead to lesions in the synovial membrane and destruction of joint cartilage and bone; kidney failure where inflammatory cytokines restrict circulation and damage nephrons; lupus where inflammatory cytokines exacerbate immune complex deposition and damage; asthma where inflammatory cytokines close the airway; psoriasis where inflammatory cytokines induce dermatitis; pancreatitis where inflammatory cytokines induce pancreatic cell injury; allergy where inflammatory cytokines induce vasopermeability and congestion; fibrosis where inflammatory cytokines attack traumatized tissue; surgical complications where inflammatory cytokines prevent healing; anemia where inflammatory cytokines attack erythropoietin production; and fibromyalgia where inflammatory cytokines are elevated in fibromyalgia patients.

Other diseases associated with chronic inflammation include cancer; heart attack where chronic inflammation contributes to coronary atherosclerosis; Alzheimer's disease where chronic inflammation destroys brain cells; congestive heart failure where chronic inflammation causes heart muscle wasting; stroke where chronic inflammation promotes thrombo-embolic events; and aortic valve stenosis where chronic inflammation damages heart valves. Arteriosclerosis, osteoporosis, Parkinson's disease, infection, inflammatory bowel disease including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis as well as multiple sclerosis (a typical autoimmune inflammatory-related disease) are also related to inflammation (Bebo, B. F., Jr., J Neurosci Res, 45: 340-348, (1996); Mennicken, F., Trends Pharmacol Sci, 20: 73-78, (1999); Watanabe, T, Int J Cardiol, 66 Suppl 1: S45-53; discussion S55, (1998); Sullivan, G. W., J Leukoc Biol, 67: 591-602, (2000); Franceschi, C., Ann N Y Acad Sci, 908: 244-254, (2000); Rogers, J, Ann N Y Acad Sci, 924: 132-135, (2000); Li, Y. J., Hum Mol Genet, 12: 3259-3267, (2003); Maccarrone, M., Curr Drug Targets Inflamm Allergy, 1: 53-63, (2002); Lindsberg, P. J., Stroke, 34: 2518-2532, (2003); DeGraba, T. J., Adv Neurol, 92: 29-42, (2003); Ito, H., Curr Drug Targets Inflamm Allergy, 2: 125-130, (2003); von der Thusen, J. H., Pharmacol Rev, 55: 133-166, (2003); Schmidt, M. I., Clin Chem Lab Med, 41: 1120-1130, (2003); Virdis, A., Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens, 12: 181-187, (2003); Tracy, R. P., Int J Clin Pract, Suppl 10-17, (2003); Haugeberg, G., Curr Opin Rheumatol, 15: 469-475, (2003); Tanaka, Y., J Bone Miner Metab, 21: 61-66, (2003); Williams, J. D., Clin Exp Dermatol, 27: 585-590, (2002)). Some diseases in advanced stages can be life threatening. Several methodologies are available for the treatment of such inflammatory diseases; the results, however, are generally unsatisfactory as evidenced by a lack of efficacy and drug related side effects associated therewith.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), both of which are idiopathic chronic diseases occurring with an increasing frequency in many parts of the world. In the United States, more than 600,000 are affected every year. IBD can involve either small bowel, large bowel, or both. CD can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, but most frequently involves the distal small bowel and colon. It either spares the rectum, or causes inflammation or infection with drainage around the rectum. UC usually causes ulcers in the lower part of the large intestine, often starting at the rectum. Patients with IBD have defective intestinal epithelial barrier function, which allows bacterial colonization of the epithelia. As a result, bacterial products and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6) cause persistent inflammatory stimulation. Bacterial antigens are introduced into the immune system by mucosal dendritic cells and macrophages. In response, intestinal phagocytes (mainly monocytes and neutrophils) proliferate and increase expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines Symptoms vary but may include diarrhea, fever, and pain. Patients with prolonged UC are at an increased risk of developing colon cancer. There is currently no satisfactory treatment, as the cause for IBD remains unclear although infectious and immunologic mechanisms have been proposed. IBD treatments aim at controlling inflammatory symptoms, conventionally using corticosteroids, aminosalicylates and standard immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine (6-mercaptopurine), methotrexate and ciclosporine. Of these, the only disease-modifying therapies are the immunosuppressive agents azathioprine and methotrexate, both of which have a slow onset of action and only a moderate efficacy. Long-term therapy may cause liver damage (fibrosis or cirrhosis) and bone marrow suppression. Also patients often become refractory to such treatment. Other therapeutic regimes merely address symptoms (Rutgeerts, P. A, J Gastroenterol Hepatol, 17 Suppl: S176-185 (2002); Rutgeerts, P., Aliment Pharmacol Ther, 17: 185-192 (2003)).

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is one of the most common immune-mediated chronic skin diseases that comes in different forms and varied levels of severity, affecting approximately 2% of the population or more than 4.5 million people in the United States of which 1.5 million are considered to have a moderate to severe form of the disease. Ten to thirty percent of patients with psoriasis also develop a form of arthritis—psoriatic arthritis, which damages the bone and connective tissue around the joints. Psoriasis appears as patches of raised red skin covered by a flaky white buildup. It may also have a pimple-ish (pustular psoriasis) or burned (erythrodermic) appearance. Psoriasis may also cause intense itching and burning. Patients suffer psychologically as well as physically. Several modalities are currently available for treatment of psoriasis, including topical treatment, phototherapy, and systemic applications. However, they are generally considered to be only disease suppressive and disease modifying; none of them are curative. Moreover, many treatments are either cosmetically undesirable, inconvenient for long-term use, or associated with significant toxicity.

There are several types of psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris) is the most common form of psoriasis. It affects 80 to 90% of people with psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis typically appears as raised areas of inflamed skin covered with silvery white scaly skin. These areas are called plaques. Flexural psoriasis (inverse psoriasis) appears as smooth inflamed patches of skin. It occurs in skin folds, particularly around the genitals (between the thigh and groin), the armpits, under an overweight stomach (pannus), and under the breasts (intramammary fold). It is aggravated by friction and sweat, and is vulnerable to fungal infections. Guttate psoriasis is characterized by numerous small oval (teardrop-shaped) spots. These numerous spots of psoriasis appear over large areas of the body, such as the trunk, limbs, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis is associated with streptococcal throat infection. Pustular psoriasis appears as raised bumps that are filled with non-infectious pus (pustules). The skin under and surrounding pustules is red and tender. Pustular psoriasis can be localized, commonly to the hands and feet (palmoplantar pustulosis), or generalized with widespread patches occurring randomly on any part of the body. Nail psoriasis produces a variety of changes in the appearance of finger and toe nails. These changes include discoloring under the nail plate, pitting of the nails, lines going across the nails, thickening of the skin under the nail, and the loosening (onycholysis) and crumbling of the nail. Psoriatic arthritis involves joint and connective tissue inflammation. Psoriatic arthritis can affect any joint but is most common in the joints of the fingers and toes. This can result in a sausage-shaped swelling of the fingers and toes known as dactylitis. Psoriatic arthritis can also affect the hips, knees and spine (spondylitis). About 10-15% of people who have psoriasis also have psoriatic arthritis. Erythrodermic psoriasis involves the widespread inflammation and exfoliation of the skin over most of the body surface. It may be accompanied by severe itching, swelling and pain. It is often the result of an exacerbation of unstable plaque psoriasis, particularly following the abrupt withdrawal of systemic treatment. This form of psoriasis can be fatal, as the extreme inflammation and exfoliation disrupt the body's ability to regulate temperature and for the skin to perform barrier functions.

With increased understanding of the biological properties of psoriasis over the past two decades, biologic therapies targeting the activity of T lymphocytes and cytokines responsible for the inflammatory nature of this disease have become available. Currently, drugs prescribed for psoriasis include TNF-α inhibitors initially used for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment, ENBREL® (etanercept), REMICADE® (infliximab) and HUMIRA® (adalimumab), and T-cell inhibitor AMEVIVE® (alefacept) from Biogen approved in 2002 and RAPTIVA® (efalizumab) from Genentech/Xoma approved in 2003 (Weinberg, J. M., J Drugs Dermatol, 1: 303-310, (2002)). AMEVIVE® (alefacept) is an immunoglobulin fusion protein composed of the first extracellular domain of human LFA-3 fused to the hinge, C(H)2 and C(H)3 domains of human IgG(1). It inhibits T cell proliferation through NK cells (Cooper, J. C., Eur J Immunol, 33: 666-675, (2003)). RAPTIVA® is also known as anti-CD11a, a humanized monoclonal antibody which targets the T cell adhesion molecule, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). Prevention of LFA-1 binding to its ligand (ICAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1) inhibits lymphocyte activation and migration, resulting in a decreased lymphocyte infiltration, thereby limiting the cascade of events eventually leading to the signs and symptoms of psoriasis (Cather, J. C., Expert Opin Biol Ther, 3: 361-370, (2003)). Potential side effects for current TNF-α inhibitors of the prior art, however, are severe, including development of lymphoma (Brown, S. L., Arthritis Rheum, 46: 3151-3158, (2002)), worsening congestive heart failure, resulting in a serious infection and sepsis, and exacerbations of multiple sclerosis and central nervous system problems (Weisman, M. H., J Rheumatol Suppl, 65: 33-38, (2002); Antoni, C., Clin Exp Rheumatol, 20: S152-157, (2002)). While side effects of the T-cell inhibitor of AMEVIVE®/RAPTIVA® may be more tolerable in psoriasis treatment, RAPTIVA® is an immunosuppressive agent. Immunosuppressive agents have the potential to increase the risk of infection, reactivate latent, chronic infections or increase the risk of cancer development.

Although many advances have been made in the understanding of the biological properties of psoriasis over the past two decades and an unconventional treatment for psoriasis has become available as described above, much of the suffering it produces is still not adequately addressed. A survey of over 40,000 American patients with psoriasis performed by the National Psoriasis Foundation in 1998 showed 79% of the younger patients felt frustrated by the ineffectiveness of their treatment. Of those with severe disease, 32% felt their treatment was not aggressive enough (Mendonca, C. O., Pharmacol Ther, 99: 133-147, (2003); Schon, M. P., J. invest Dermatol, 112: 405-410, (1999)).

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) represents another example of troublesome inflammatory disorders. It is a common chronic inflammatory-related disease characterized by chronic inflammation in the membrane lining (the synovium) of the joints and/or other internal organs. The inflammatory cells can also invade and damage bone and cartilage. The joint involved can lose its shape and alignment, resulting in loss of movement. Patients with RA have pain, stiffness, warmth, redness and swelling in the joint, and other systemic symptoms like fever, fatigue, and anemia. Approximately 1% of the population or 2.1 million in the U.S. are currently affected, of which more are women (1.5 million) than men (0.6 million). The pathology of RA is not fully understood although the cascade of improper immunological reactions has been postulated as a mechanism. Conventional treatment is unfortunately inefficient in RA (Bessis, N., J Gene Med, 4: 581-591, (2002)). The disease does not respond completely to symptomatic medications including corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used since the 1950s. Also, these medications carry a risk of serious adverse effects. The therapeutic effects of the disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as Methotrexate (MTX) are often inconsistent and short-lived.

The role of the cytokine network in mediating inflammation and joint destruction in RA has been extensively investigated in recent years. In addition to TNF-α, IL-1 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and the clinical manifestations of RA (54). The ability of IL-1 to drive inflammation and joint erosion and to inhibit tissue repair processes has been clearly established in in vitro systems and in animal models, and alleviation of inflammatory symptoms in RA patients has been achieved by blockage of IL-1 (Bresnihan, B., Arthritis Rheum, 41: 2196-2204, (1998)). IL-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates the immune response, hematopoiesis, the acute phase response, and inflammation. Deregulation of IL-6 production is implicated in the pathology of several diseases including RA. A therapeutic approach to block the IL-6 signal has been carried out by using humanized anti-IL-6R antibody for RA among other diseases (Ito, H., Curr Drug Targets Inflamm Allergy, 2: 125-130, (2003); Ishihara, K Cytokine Growth Factor Rev, 13: 357-368, (2002)). IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine Expressing IL-10 has been shown to prevent arthritis or ameliorate the disease in animal models (57, 58). While it is obvious that cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and IL-10 have independent roles, they act in concert in mediating certain pathophysiological processes in RA. The finding of a class of molecules described in this invention, which are able to modulate these different cytokines, will result in dramatic therapeutic progress in the treatment of RA.

A new class of biologic DMARDs (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs) for the treatment of RA has recently been developed based on an understanding of the role of cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1, in the inflammatory process. The FDA has approved several such DMARDs including ENBREL® (etanercept) from Immunex/Amgen Inc. in 1998, REMICADE® (infliximab) from Centocor/Johnson & Johnson, HUMIRA® (adalimumab) from Abbott Laboratories Inc. in 2002, and KINERET® (anakinra) from Amgen in 2001. ENBREL® is a soluble TNF receptor (TNFR) recombinant protein. REMICADE® is a humanized mouse (chimeric) anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody. HUMIRA® is a fully human anti-TNF monoclonal antibody created using phage display technology resulting in an antibody with human-derived heavy and light chain variable regions and human IgG1:k constant regions. All these 3 protein-based drugs target and bind to TNF-α to block the effects of TNF-α. KINERET® is a recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist, which is similar to native human IL-1Ra, except for the addition of a single methionine residue at its amino terminus. KINERET® blocks the biologic activity of IL-1 by competitively inhibiting IL-1 binding to the IL-1 type I receptor (IL-1RI) and consequently reducing the pro-inflammatory effects of IL-1.

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease diagnosed in 350,000 to 500,000 people in the United States. Multiple areas of inflammation and loss of myelin in the brain and spinal cord signify the disease. Patients with MS exhibit varied degrees of neurological impairment depending on the location and extent of the loss of the myelin. There is evidence that the expression of chemokines (IL-8 family members) during CNS autoimmune inflammation is regulated by some pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF (Glabinski, A. R., Scand J Immunol, 58: 81-88, (2003)). The roles of other pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1-beta., IL-6 and IL-10 were also confirmed in EAE animal models (Diab, A., J Neuropathol Exp Neurol, 56: 641-650, (1997); Samoilova, E. B., J Immunol, 161: 6480-6486, (1998); Robertson, J., J Cell Biol, 155: 217-226, (2001)) as well as in humans (de Jong, B. A., J Neuroimmunol, 126: 172-179, (2002)). IL-1β is present in MS lesions. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) moderates the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Increased risk of MS has been seen in individuals with High IL-1 (3 over IL-1Ra production ratio and high TNF over IL-10 production ratio (de Jong, B. A., J Neuroimmunol, 126: 172-179, (2002)). Common symptoms of MS include fatigue, weakness, spasticity, balance problems, bladder and bowel problems, numbness, vision loss, tremors and depression. Current treatment of MS only alleviates symptoms or delays the progression of disability, and several new treatments for MS including stem cell transplantation and gene therapy are conservatory (Fassas, A., Blood Rev, 17: 233-240, (2003); Furlan, R., Curr Pharm Des, 9: 2002-2008, (2003)). While anti-TNF antibodies have shown protective effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), they aggravate the disease in MS patients, suggesting that inhibition of TNF-α alone is not sufficient (Ghezzi, P., Neuroimmunomodulation, 9: 178-182, (2001)).

Neurodegenerative Disorders

Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PK) are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders. AD seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. It involves the parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language. About 4 million Americans, usually after age 60, are estimated to suffer from AD.

PK is a progressive disorder of the central nervous system affecting over 1.5 million people in the United States. Clinically, the disease is characterized by a decrease in spontaneous movements, gait difficulty, postural instability, rigidity and tremor. PK is caused by the degeneration of the pigmented neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain, resulting in decreased dopamine availability. The causes of these neurodegenerative disorders are unknown and there is currently no cure for the disease.

Thus, novel approaches for the treatment of the above and other inflammatory-related diseases are needed. Although inflammatory-related disease mechanisms remain unclear and often vary from each other, dysfunction of the immune system caused by deregulation of cytokines has been demonstrated to play an important role in the initiation and progression of inflammation (Schon, M. P., J Invest Dermatol, 112: 405-410, (1999); Andreakos, E. T., Cytokine Growth Factor Rev, 13: 299-313, (2002); Najarian, D. J., J Am Acad Dermatol, 48: 805-821, (2003)).

Post-Radiotherapy Related Inflammation:

Radiation damage related inflammatory diseases to the rectum and sigmoid colon are most common complications with radiation therapy for cancers in the pelvic region, which include cancers of the cervix, uterus, prostate, bladder, and testes. Radiation proctosigmoiditis is the most common clinically apparent form of colonic damage after pelvic irradiation with an incidence of 5% to 20%. Patients typically exhibit symptoms of tenesmus, bleeding, low-volume diarrhea, and rectal pain. Rarely, low-grade obstruction or fistulous tracts into adjacent organs may develop.

Cytokines can be generally classified into 3 types: pro-inflammatory (IL-1α, β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, IL-7, IL-9, IL-12, IL-17, IL-18, IL-23, TNF-α, LT, LIF, Oncostatin, and IFNc1α, β, γ); anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, W-13 and TGF-β); and chemokines (IL-8, Gro-α, MIP-1, MCP-1, ENA-78, and RANTES).

Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) are proinflammatory cytokines that mediate inflammatory responses associated with infectious agents and other cellular stresses. Overproduction of cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF-α is believed to underlie the progression of many inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, endotoxin shock, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease, congestive heart failure, and psoriasis among others (Dinarello, C. A. et al., Rev. Infect. Diseases 1984, 6:51; Salituro et al., Curr. Med. Chem. 1999, 6:807-823; Henry et al., Drugs Fut. 1999, 24:1345-1354). An accepted therapeutic approach for potential drug intervention in these conditions is the reduction of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α (also referred to as TNFa) and interleukin-1β (IL-1b).

Phosphodiesterase4

The cyclic nucleotide specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) represent a family of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of various cyclic nucleoside monophosphates (including cAMP and cGMP). These cyclic nucleotides act as second messengers within cells, and as messengers, carry impulses from cell surface receptors having bound various hormones and neurotransmitters. PDEs act to regulate the level of cyclic nucleotides within cells and maintain cyclic nucleotide homeostasis by degrading such cyclic mononucleotides resulting in termination of their messenger role.

PDE enzymes can be grouped into eleven families according to their specificity toward hydrolysis of cAMP or cGMP, their sensitivity to regulation by calcium, calmodulin or cGMP, and their selective inhibition by various compounds. For example, PDE 1 is stimulated by Ca2+/calmodulin. PDE 2 is cGMP-dependent, and is found in the heart and adrenals. PDE 3 is cGMP-dependent, and inhibition of this enzyme creates positive inotropic activity. PDE 4 is cAMP specific, and its inhibition causes airway relaxation, antiinflammatory and antidepressant activity. PDE 5 appears to be important in regulating cGMP content in vascular smooth muscle, and therefore PDE 5 inhibitors may have cardiovascular activity. Since the PDEs possess distinct biochemical properties, it is likely that they are subject to a variety of different forms of regulation.

PDE4 is distinguished by various kinetic properties including low Michaelis constant for cAMP and sensitivity to certain drugs. The PDE4 enzyme family consists of four genes, which produce 4 isoforms of the PDE4 enzyme designated PDE4A, PDE4B, PDE4C, and PDE4D [See: Wang et al., Expression, Purification, and Characterization of human cAMP-Specific Phosphodiesterase (PDE4) Subtypes A, B, C, and D, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm., 234, 320 324 (1997)] In addition, various splice variants of each PDE4 isoform have been identified.

PDE4 isoenzymes are localized in the cytosol of cells and are unassociated with any known membranous structures. PDE4 isoenzymes specifically inactivate cAMP by catalyzing its hydrolysis to adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP). Regulation of cAMP activity is important in many biological processes, including inflammation and memory Inhibitors of PDE4 isoenzymes such as rolipram, piclamilast, CDP-840 and ariflo are powerful antiinflammatory agents and therefore may be useful in treating diseases where inflammation is problematic such as asthma or arthritis. Further, rolipram improves the cognitive performance of rats and mice in learning paradigms.

Epidermal Growth Factor or EGF

The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR; ErbB-1; HER1 in humans) is the cell-surface receptor for members of the epidermal growth factor family (EGF-family) of extracellular protein ligands. The epidermal growth factor receptor is a member of the ErbB family of receptors. Mutations affecting EGFR expression or activity could result in cancer.

EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) exists on the cell surface and is activated by binding of its specific ligands, including epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor α (TGFα).

Upon activation by its growth factor ligands, EGFR undergoes a transition from an inactive monomeric form to an active homodimer—although there is some evidence that preformed inactive dimers may also exist before ligand binding. In addition to forming homodimers after ligand binding, EGFR may pair with another member of the ErbB receptor family, such as ErbB2/Her2/neu, to create an activated heterodimer. There is also evidence to suggest that clusters of activated EGFRs form, although it remains unclear whether this clustering is important for activation itself or occurs subsequent to activation of individual dimers.

EGFR dimerization stimulates its intrinsic intracellular protein-tyrosine kinase activity. As a result, autophosphorylation of several tyrosine (Y) residues in the C-terminal domain of EGFR occurs. These include Y992, Y1045, Y1068, Y1148 and Y1173 as shown in the diagram to the left. This autophosphorylation elicits downstream activation and signaling by several other proteins that associate with the phosphorylated tyrosines through their own phosphotyrosine-binding SH2 domains. These downstream signaling proteins initiate several signal transduction cascades, principally the MAPK, Akt and JNK pathways, leading to DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Such proteins modulate phenotypes such as cell migration, adhesion, and proliferation. The kinase domain of EGFR can also cross-phosphorylate tyrosine residues of other receptors it is aggregated with, and can itself be activated in that manner.

HM74A

HM74A or GPR109A is a G protein-coupled receptor for niacin. It couples to Gi alpha subunit. HM74A is known to be involved in the biosynthesis of niacin.

Histamine

Histamine is a biogenic amine involved in local immune responses as well as regulating physiological function in the gut and acting as a neurotransmitter. Histamine exerts its actions by combining with specific cellular histamine receptors. The four histamine receptors that have been discovered are designated H1 through H4. H1 is found on smooth muscle, endothelium and central nervous system tissue. H1 receptors cause vasodilation, bronchoconstriction, smooth muscle activation, separation of endothelial cells (responsible for hives) and pain and itching due to insect stings. H1 is also a primary receptor for allergic rhinitis symptoms and motion sickness. H2 is located on parietal cells and is primarily involved in gastric acid secretion. H3 is implicated with decreased neurotransmitter release. H4 has an unknown physiological role and is found primarily in the thymus, small intestine, spleen and colon, as well as basophils and bone marrow.

Beta-2 Adrenergic Receptor

The beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2 adrenoreceptor), also known as ADRB2, is an beta-adrenergic receptor, and also denotes the human gene encoding it. This receptor is directly associated with one of its ultimate effectors, the class C L-type calcium channel CaV1.2. This receptor-channel complex also contains a G protein—Gs, which activate an adenylyl cyclase, cAMP-dependent kinase, and the counterbalancing phosphatase, PP2A. The assembly of the signaling complex provides a mechanism that ensures specific and rapid signaling by this G protein-coupled receptor. A two-state biophysical and molecular model has been proposed to account for the pH and REDOX sensitivity of this and other GPCRs. The beta-2 adrenergic receptor is involved with smooth muscle relaxation in the uterus. The beta-2 adrenergic receptor is involved with the digestion in the GI tract. The beta-2 adrenergic receptor is also involved with smooth muscle relaxation, dilation of blood vessels (such as coronary arteries, hepatic arteries and arteries to skeletal muscles). The beta-2 adrenergic receptor is also involved with striated muscle relaxation.

KATP

KATP is implicated in the control of insulin release.

Protein Kinase C

Protein kinase C is a family of protein kinases consisting of ˜10 isozymes. They are divided into three subfamilies, based on their second messenger requirements: conventional (or classical), novel, and atypical. Conventional (c)PKCs contain the isoforms α, βI, βII, and γ. These require Ca2+, diacylglycerol (DAG), and a phospholipid such as phosphatidylcholine for activation. Novel (n)PKCs include the δ, ε, ρ, and θ isoforms, and require DAG, but do not require Ca2+ for activation. Thus, conventional and novel PKCs are activated through the same signal transduction pathway as phospholipase C. On the other hand, atypical (a)PKCs (including protein kinase Mζ and ι/λ isoforms) require neither Ca2+ nor diacylglycerol for activation. The term “protein kinase C” usually refers to the entire family of isoforms. PKC phosphorylates other proteins, altering their function. PKC is usually involved in smooth muscle contraction. In the vascular system, PKC is involved in vasoconstriction. In the bronchial system, PKC is involved in bronchoconstriction.

Protein Kinase A

Protein kinase A is a family of enzymes whose activity is dependent on the level of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in the cell. PKA is also known as cAMP-dependent protein kinase). Protein kinase A has several functions in the cell, including regulation of glycogen, sugar, and lipid metabolism. Each PKA is a holoenzyme that consists of two regulatory and two catalytic subunits. Under low levels of cAMP, the holoenzyme remains intact and is catalytically inactive. When the concentration of cAMP rises (e.g. activation of adenylate cyclases by G protein-coupled receptors coupled to Gs, inhibition of phosphodiesterases which degrade cAMP), cAMP binds to the two binding sites on the regulatory subunits, which leads to the release of the catalytic subunits. The free catalytic subunits can then catalyze the transfer of ATP terminal phosphates to protein substrates at serine, or threonine residues. This phosphorylation usually results in a change in activity of the substrate. Since PKAs are present in a variety of cells and act on different substrates, PKA and cAMP regulation are involved in many different pathways. PKA is usually influenced by cAMP. Also, the catalytic subunit itself can be regulated by phosphorylation. Downregulation of protein kinase A occurs by a feedback mechanism: one of the substrates that is activated by the kinase is a phosphodiesterase, which quickly converts cAMP to AMP, thus reducing the amount of cAMP that can activate protein kinase A. In adipocytes, PKA in involved with lipolysis. In myocytes, PKA in involved with the production of glucose as well as vasodilation.

Protease Activated Receptor1

Protease-activated receptors are a subfamily of related G protein-coupled receptors that are activated by cleavage of part of their extracellular domain. They are highly expressed in platelets, but also on endothelial cells, myocytes and neurons. PAR's are activated by the action of serine proteases such as thrombin (acts on PAR1) and trypsin. These enzymes cleave the N-terminus of the receptor, which in turn acts as a tethered ligand. In the cleaved state, part of the receptor itself acts as the agonist, causing a physiological response.

Most of the PAR family act through the actions of G-proteins i (cAMP inhibitory), 12/13 (Raf/Ras activation) and q (calcium signaling) to cause cellular actions.

TLR 3

TLR 3 is a member of the Toll-like receptor family of pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Discovered in 2001, TLR3 recognizes double-stranded RNA, a form of genetic information carried by some viruses such as reoviruses. Upon recognition, TLR 3 induces the activation of NF-kB to increase production of type I interferons which signal other cells to increase their antiviral defenses. Double-stranded RNA is also recognized by the cytoplasmic receptors RIG-I and MDA-5. TLR3 has also been designated as CD283 (cluster of differentiation 283).

ROCK1 and ROCK2

Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinases, such as ROCK1 and ROCK2, are protein serine/threonine kinases that regulate cell morphology, largely through the regulation of actin-myosin and intermediate filaments. Human ROCK1 and ROCK2 have 65% identity overall, with 92% identity in their kinase domains. ROCK1 directly influences cellular functions such as contraction, cytokinesis, adhesion, and motility, endothelial barrier function, and membrane blebbing. In addition, ROCK1 indirectly influences processes such as gene transcription, proliferation, cell size, and survival. The physiological functions influenced by ROCK1 include neuronal morphogenesis, smooth muscle contraction, immune cell chemotaxis, and epithelial sheet movements. The pathophysiological conditions influenced by ROCK1 include tumor cell metastasis, hypertension, vasospasm, bronchial asthma, and glaucoma. ROCK1 regulation of actin-myosin filaments is also essential in closure of the eyelids and ventral body wall. Additional information on ROCK1 and ROCK2 can be found in: Shimokawa et al., Trends Pharmacol. Sci., (2007) 28(6): 296-302; and Olson et al., Curr. Opin. Cell Biol., (2008) 20:242-248.

AAK1

Adaptor-related protein complex 2 (AP-2 complexes) functions during receptor-mediated endocytosis to trigger clathrin assembly, interact with membrane-bound receptors, and recruit encodytic accessory factors. The AP2 Associated Kinase 1 (AAK1) is a member of the SNF1 subfamily of Ser/Thr protein kinases. AAK1 interacts with and phosphorylates a subunit of the AP-2 complex, which promotes binding of AP-2 to sorting signals found in membrane-bound receptors and subsequent receptor endocytosis. Its kinase activity is stimulated by clathrin. Additional information on AAK1 can be found in: Sorensen et al., Traffic (2008) 9: 1791-1800 and Conner et al., Nature, (2003) 422: 37.

Compounds which can inhibit the biological moieties described above, or treat diseases involving those biological moieties, would be a significant advance in the art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In a first aspect, the invention provides a compound of the invention which is described in Example 1. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is a member selected from T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z.

The invention also provides pharmaceutical formulations, and methods of making and using the compounds described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

I. Definitions and Abbreviations

As used herein, the singular forms “a,” “an”, and “the” include plural references unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. For example, reference to “an active agent” includes a single active agent as well as two or more different active agents in combination. It is to be understood that present teaching is not limited to the specific dosage forms, carriers, or the like, disclosed herein and as such may vary.

The abbreviations used herein generally have their conventional meaning within the chemical and biological arts.

The following abbreviations have been used: aq. is aqueous; AcOH is acetic acid; ACTBr is cetyltrimethylammonium bromide; B2pin2-bis(pinacolato)diboron; Boc is tert-butoxy carbonyl; Boc2O-di-tert-butyl dicarbonate; BzOOH-benzoyl peroxide; Cs2CO3 is cesium carbonate; DABCO is 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane; DCM is dichloromethane or methylene chloride; DIAD is diisopropyl azodicarboxylate; DIEA is diisopropylethylamine; N,N-Diisopropylethylamine is DIPEA; DMAP is 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine; DME is 1,2-dimethoxyethane; DMF is N,N-dimethylformamide; DMSO is dimethylsulfoxide; eq. is equivalent; EtOAc is ethyl acetate; EtOH is ethanol; Et2O is diethyl ether; EDCI-N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride; m-CPBA-3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid; equiv-equivalent; h is hours; HATU is O-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate; HCl is hydrochloric acid; HPLC is high pressure liquid chromatography; ISCO Companion is automated flash chromatography equipment with fraction analysis by UV absorption available from Presearch; KOAc is potassium acetate; K2CO3 is potassium carbonate; LiAlH4 or LAH is lithium aluminum hydride; LDA is lithium diisopropylamide; LHMDS is lithium bis(trimethylsilyl) amide; KHMDS is potassium bis(trimethylsilyl) amide; LiOH is lithium hydroxide; m-CPBA is 3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid; MeCN is acetonitrile; MeOH is methanol; MgSO4 is magnesium sulfate; mins or min is minutes; Mp or MP is melting point; NaCNBH3 is sodium cyanoborohydride; NaOH is sodium hydroxide; Na2SO4 is sodium sulfate; NH4Cl is ammonium chloride; N2 is nitrogen; NMM-N-methylmorpholine; n-BuLi is n-butyllithium; overnight is O/N; PdCl2(pddf) is 1,1′-Bis(diphenylphosphino) ferrocene]dichloropalladium(II); PrOH is 1-propanol; iPrOH is 2-propanol; POCl3 is phosphorus chloride oxide; RT or rt is room temperature; TFA is trifluoroacetic acid; Tf2O is trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride; THF is tetrahydrofuran; THP-tetrahydropyranyl; TMSI is trimethylsilyl iodide; H2O is water; Ac-acetyl; PTSA-para-toluene sulfonic acid; Pyr.-Pyridine; Cbz-benzyloxycarbonyl; PMB-p-methoxybenzyl; DHP-dihydropyran; CSA-camphor sulfonic acid; CTAB-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide; sat.-saturated; Cy-cyclohexyl; Ph-phenyl; Ar-aryl.

“Compound of the invention,” as used herein refers to the compounds discussed herein, salts (e.g. pharmaceutically acceptable salts), prodrugs, solvates and hydrates of these compounds.

“Boron containing compounds”, as used herein, refers to the compounds of the invention that contain boron as part of their chemical formula.

MIC, or minimum inhibitory concentration, is the point where the compound stops more than 50% of cell growth, preferably 60% of cell growth, preferably 70% of cell growth, preferably 80% of cell growth, preferably 90% of cell growth, relative to an untreated control.

Where substituent groups are specified by their conventional chemical formulae, written from left to right, they equally encompass the chemically identical substituents, which would result from writing the structure from right to left, e.g., —CH2O— is intended to also recite —OCH2—.

The term “poly” as used herein means at least 2. For example, a polyvalent metal ion is a metal ion having a valency of at least 2.

The term “hinge region” as used herein refers to a series of amino acid residues which form a portion of the ATP-binding pocket of the catalytic kinase domain of a serine/threonine kinase. The hinge region is responsible for binding the adenine portion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This series of amino acid residues links a region consisting predominantly of beta-sheet tertiary structures with a region consisting predominantly of alpha-helix tertiary structures. For example, for ROCK1, the hinge region comprises amino acid residues 154-158, and links beta strand 5, which is part of a predominantly beta-sheet tertiary structure region (amino acid residues 73-153), with alpha helix D, which is part of a predominantly alpha-helix tertiary structure region (amino acid residues 159-356). For Protein Kinase A (PKA), the hinge region comprises amino acid residues 121-125, and link a predominantly beta-sheet tertiary structure region (amino acid residues 73-153) with a predominantly alpha-helix tertiary structure region (amino acid residues 159-356).

“Moiety” refers to a radical of a molecule that is attached to the remainder of the molecule.

The symbol

, whether utilized as a bond or displayed perpendicular to a bond, indicates the point at which the displayed moiety is attached to the remainder of the molecule.

The term “alkyl,” by itself or as part of another substituent, means, unless otherwise stated, a straight or branched chain, or cyclic hydrocarbon radical, or combination thereof, which may be fully saturated, mono- or polyunsaturated and can include di- and multivalent radicals, having the number of carbon atoms designated (i.e. C1-C10 means one to ten carbons). In some embodiments, the term “alkyl” means a straight or branched chain, or combinations thereof, which may be fully saturated, mono- or polyunsaturated and can include di- and multivalent radicals. Examples of saturated hydrocarbon radicals include, but are not limited to, groups such as methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, n-butyl, t-butyl, isobutyl, sec-butyl, cyclohexyl, (cyclohexyl)methyl, cyclopropylmethyl, homologs and isomers of, for example, n-pentyl, n-hexyl, n-heptyl, n-octyl, and the like. An unsaturated alkyl group is one having one or more double bonds or triple bonds. Examples of unsaturated alkyl groups include, but are not limited to, vinyl, 2-propenyl, crotyl, 2-isopentenyl, 2-(butadienyl), 2,4-pentadienyl, 3-(1,4-pentadienyl), ethynyl, 1- and 3-propynyl, 3-butynyl, and the higher homologs and isomers.

The term “alkylene” by itself or as part of another substituent means a divalent radical derived from an alkane, as exemplified, but not limited, by —CH2CH2CH2CH2—, and further includes those groups described below as “heteroalkylene.” Typically, an alkyl (or alkylene) group will have from 1 to 24 carbon atoms, with those groups having 10 or fewer carbon atoms being preferred in the present invention. A “lower alkyl” or “lower alkylene” is a shorter chain alkyl or alkylene group, generally having eight or fewer carbon atoms.

The terms “alkoxy,” “alkylamino” and “alkylthio” (or thioalkoxy) are used in their conventional sense, and refer to those alkyl groups attached to the remainder of the molecule via an oxygen atom, an amino group, or a sulfur atom, respectively.

The term “heteroalkyl,” by itself or in combination with another term, means, unless otherwise stated, a stable straight or branched chain, or cyclic hydrocarbon radical, or combinations thereof, consisting of the stated number of carbon atoms and at least one heteroatom. In some embodiments, the term “heteroalkyl,” by itself or in combination with another term, means a stable straight or branched chain, or combinations thereof, consisting of the stated number of carbon atoms and at least one heteroatom. In an exemplary embodiment, the heteroatoms can be selected from the group consisting of B, O, N and S, and wherein the nitrogen and sulfur atoms may optionally be oxidized and the nitrogen heteroatom may optionally be quaternized. The heteroatom(s) B, O, N and S may be placed at any interior position of the heteroalkyl group or at the position at which the alkyl group is attached to the remainder of the molecule. Examples include, but are not limited to, —CH2—CH2—O—CH3, —CH2—CH2—NH—CH3, —CH2—CH2—N(CH3)—CH3, —CH2—S—CH2—CH3, —CH2—CH2, —S(O)—CH3, —CH2—CH2—S(O)2—CH3, —CH═CH—O—CH3, —CH2—CH═N—OCH3, and —CH═CH—N(CH3)—CH3. Up to two heteroatoms may be consecutive, such as, for example, —CH2—NH—OCH3. Similarly, the term “heteroalkylene” by itself or as part of another substituent means a divalent radical derived from heteroalkyl, as exemplified, but not limited by, —CH2—CH2—S—CH2—CH2— and —CH2—S—CH2—CH2—NH—CH2—. For heteroalkylene groups, heteroatoms can also occupy either or both of the chain termini (e.g., alkyleneoxy, alkylenedioxy, alkyleneamino, alkylenediamino, and the like). Still further, for alkylene and heteroalkylene linking groups, no orientation of the linking group is implied by the direction in which the formula of the linking group is written. For example, the formula —C(O)2R′— represents both —C(O)2R′— and —R′C(O)2—.

The terms “cycloalkyl” and “heterocycloalkyl”, by themselves or in combination with other terms, represent, unless otherwise stated, cyclic versions of “alkyl” and “heteroalkyl”, respectively. Additionally, for heterocycloalkyl, a heteroatom can occupy the position at which the heterocycle is attached to the remainder of the molecule. Examples of cycloalkyl include, but are not limited to, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl, 1-cyclohexenyl, 3-cyclohexenyl, cycloheptyl, and the like. Examples of heterocycloalkyl include, but are not limited to, 1-(1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridyl), 1-piperidinyl, 2-piperidinyl, 3-piperidinyl, 4-morpholinyl, 3-morpholinyl, tetrahydrofuran-2-yl, tetrahydrofuran-3-yl, tetrahydrothien-2-yl, tetrahydrothien-3-yl, 1-piperazinyl, 2-piperazinyl, and the like.

The terms “halo” or “halogen,” by themselves or as part of another substituent, mean, unless otherwise stated, a fluorine, chlorine, bromine, or iodine atom. Additionally, terms such as “haloalkyl,” are meant to include monohaloalkyl and polyhaloalkyl. For example, the term “halo(C1-C4)alkyl” is mean to include, but not be limited to, trifluoromethyl, 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl, 4-chlorobutyl, 3-bromopropyl, and the like.

The term “aryl” means, unless otherwise stated, a polyunsaturated, aromatic, substituent that can be a single ring or multiple rings (preferably from 1 to 3 rings), which are fused together or linked covalently. The term “heteroaryl” refers to aryl groups (or rings) that contain from one to four heteroatoms. In an exemplary embodiment, the heteroatom is selected from B, N, O, and S, wherein the nitrogen and sulfur atoms are optionally oxidized, and the nitrogen atom(s) are optionally quaternized. A heteroaryl group can be attached to the remainder of the molecule through a heteroatom. Non-limiting examples of aryl and heteroaryl groups include phenyl, 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, 4-biphenyl, 1-pyrrolyl, 2-pyrrolyl, 3-pyrrolyl, 3-pyrazolyl, 2-imidazolyl, 4-imidazolyl, pyrazinyl, 2-oxazolyl, 4-oxazolyl, 2-phenyl-4-oxazolyl, 5-oxazolyl, 3-isoxazolyl, 4-isoxazolyl, 5-isoxazolyl, 2-thiazolyl, 4-thiazolyl, 5-thiazolyl, 2-furyl, 3-furyl, 2-thienyl, 3-thienyl, 2-pyridyl, 3-pyridyl, 4-pyridyl, 2-pyrimidyl, 4-pyrimidyl, 5-benzothiazolyl, purinyl, 2-benzimidazolyl, 5-indolyl, 1-isoquinolyl, 5-isoquinolyl, 2-quinoxalinyl, 5-quinoxalinyl, 3-quinolyl, 6-quinolyl, dioxaborolane, dioxaborinane and dioxaborepane. Substituents for each of the above noted aryl and heteroaryl ring systems are selected from the group of acceptable substituents described below.

For brevity, the term “aryl” when used in combination with other terms (e.g., aryloxy, arylthioxy, arylalkyl) includes both aryl and heteroaryl rings as defined above. Thus, the term “arylalkyl” is meant to include those radicals in which an aryl group is attached to an alkyl group (e.g., benzyl, phenethyl, pyridylmethyl and the like) including those alkyl groups in which a carbon atom (e.g., a methylene group) has been replaced by, for example, an oxygen atom (e.g., phenoxymethyl, 2-pyridyloxymethyl, 3-(1-naphthyloxy)propyl, and the like).

Each of the above terms (e.g., “alkyl,” “heteroalkyl,” “aryl” and “heteroaryl”) are meant to include both substituted and unsubstituted forms of the indicated radical. Preferred substituents for each type of radical are provided below.

Substituents for the alkyl and heteroalkyl radicals (including those groups often referred to as alkylene, alkenyl, heteroalkylene, heteroalkenyl, alkynyl, cycloalkyl, heterocycloalkyl, cycloalkenyl, and heterocycloalkenyl) are generically referred to as “alkyl group substituents,” and they can be one or more of a variety of groups selected from, but not limited to: —R′, —OR′, ═O, ═NR′, ═N—OR′, —NR′R″, —SR′, -halogen, —SiR′R″R′″, —OC(O)R′, —C(O)R′, —CO2R′, —CONR′R″, —OC(O)NR′R″, —NR″C(O)R′, —NR′—C(O)NR″R′″, —NR″C(O)2R′, —NR′″″—C(NR′R″R′″)═NR″″, —NR″″—C(NR′R″)═NR′″, —S(O)R′, —S(O)2R′, —S(O)2NR′R″, —NR″SO2R′, —CN, —NO2, —N3, —CH(Ph)2, fluoro(C1-C4)alkoxy, and fluoro(C1-C4)alkyl, in a number ranging from zero to (2m′+1), where m′ is the total number of carbon atoms in such radical. R′, R″, R′″, R″″ and R′″″ each preferably independently refer to hydrogen, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, e.g., aryl substituted with 1-3 halogens, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, alkoxy or thioalkoxy groups, or arylalkyl groups. When a compound of the invention includes more than one R group, for example, each of the R groups is independently selected as are each R′, R″, R′″, R″″ and R′″″ groups when more than one of these groups is present. When R′ and R″ are attached to the same nitrogen atom, they can be combined with the nitrogen atom to form a 5-, 6-, or 7-membered ring. For example, —NR′R″ is meant to include, but not be limited to, 1-pyrrolidinyl and 4-morpholinyl. From the above discussion of substituents, one of skill in the art will understand that the term “alkyl” is meant to include groups including carbon atoms bound to groups other than hydrogen groups, such as haloalkyl (e.g., —CF3 and —CH2CF3) and acyl (e.g., —C(O)CH3, —C(O)CF3, —C(O)CH2OCH3, and the like).

Similar to the substituents described for the alkyl radical, substituents for the aryl and heteroaryl groups are generically referred to as “aryl group substituents.” The substituents are selected from, for example: —R′, —OR′, ═O, ═NR′, ═N—OR′, —NR′R″, —SR′, -halogen, —SiR′R″R′″, —OC(O)R′, —C(O)R′, —CO2R′, —CONR′R″, —OC(O)NR′R″, —NR″C(O)R′, —NR′—C(O)NR″R′″, —NR″C(O)2R′, —NR′″″—C(NR′R″R′″)═NR″″, —NR″″—C(NR′R″)═NR′″, —S(O)R′, —S(O)2R′, —S(O)2NR′R″, —NR″SO2R′, —CN, —NO2, —N3, —CH(Ph)2, fluoro(C1-C4)alkoxy, and fluoro(C1-C4)alkyl, in a number ranging from zero to the total number of open valences on the aromatic ring system; and where R′, R″, R′″, R″″ and R′″″ are preferably independently selected from hydrogen, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl. When a compound of the invention includes more than one R group, for example, each of the R groups is independently selected as are each R′, R″, R′″, R″″ and R′″″ groups when more than one of these groups is present.

Two of the substituents on adjacent atoms of the aryl or heteroaryl ring may optionally be replaced with a substituent of the formula -T-C(O)—(CRR′)q—U—, wherein T and U are independently —NR—, —O—, —CRR′— or a single bond, and q is an integer of from 0 to 3. Alternatively, two of the substituents on adjacent atoms of the aryl or heteroaryl ring may optionally be replaced with a substituent of the formula -A-(CH2)r—B—, wherein A and B are independently —CRR′—, —O—, —NR—, —S—, —S(O)—, —S(O)2—, —S(O)2NR′— or a single bond, and r is an integer of from 1 to 4. One of the single bonds of the new ring so formed may optionally be replaced with a double bond. Alternatively, two of the substituents on adjacent atoms of the aryl or heteroaryl ring may optionally be replaced with a substituent of the formula —(CRR′)s—X—(CR″R′″)d—, where s and d are independently integers of from 0 to 3, and X is —O—, —NR′—, —S—, —S(O)—, —S(O)2—, or —S(O)2NR′—. The substituents R, R′, R″ and R′″ are preferably independently selected from hydrogen or substituted or unsubstituted (C1-C6)alkyl.

“Ring” as used herein, means a substituted or unsubstituted cycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heterocycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, or substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl. A ring includes fused ring moieties. The number of atoms in a ring is typically defined by the number of members in the ring. For example, a “5- to 7-membered ring” means there are 5 to 7 atoms in the encircling arrangement. Unless otherwise specified, the ring optionally includes a heteroatom. Thus, the term “5- to 7-membered ring” includes, for example phenyl, pyridinyl and piperidinyl. The term “5- to 7-membered heterocycloalkyl ring”, on the other hand, would include pyridinyl and piperidinyl, but not phenyl. The term “ring” further includes a ring system comprising more than one “ring”, wherein each “ring” is independently defined as above.

As used herein, the term “heteroatom” includes atoms other than carbon (C) and hydrogen (H). Examples include oxygen (O), nitrogen (N) sulfur (S), silicon (Si), germanium (Ge), aluminum (Al) and boron (B).

The term “leaving group” means a functional group or atom which can be displaced by another functional group or atom in a substitution reaction, such as a nucleophilic substitution reaction. By way of example, representative leaving groups include triflate, chloro, bromo and iodo groups; sulfonic ester groups, such as mesylate, tosylate, brosylate, nosylate and the like; and acyloxy groups, such as acetoxy, trifluoroacetoxy and the like.

The symbol “R” is a general abbreviation that represents a substituent group that is selected from substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl, substituted or unsubstituted cycloalkyl and substituted or unsubstituted heterocycloalkyl groups.

By “effective” amount of a drug, formulation, or permeant is meant a sufficient amount of an active agent to provide the desired local or systemic effect. A “Topically effective,” “Cosmetically effective,” “pharmaceutically effective,” or “therapeutically effective” amount refers to the amount of drug needed to effect the desired therapeutic result.

“Topically effective” refers to a material that, when applied to the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof produces a desired pharmacological result either locally at the place of application or systemically as a result of transdermal passage of an active ingredient in the material.

“Cosmetically effective” refers to a material that, when applied to the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof, produces a desired cosmetic result locally at the place of application of an active ingredient in the material.

The term “pharmaceutically acceptable salt” is meant to include a salt of a compound of the invention which are prepared with relatively nontoxic acids or bases, depending on the particular substituents found on the compounds described herein. When compounds of the invention contain relatively acidic functionalities, base addition salts can be obtained by contacting the neutral form of such compounds with a sufficient amount of the desired base, either neat or in a suitable inert solvent. Examples of pharmaceutically acceptable base addition salts include sodium, potassium, calcium, ammonium, organic amino, or magnesium salt, or a similar salt. When compounds of the invention contain relatively basic functionalities, acid addition salts can be obtained by contacting the neutral form of such compounds with a sufficient amount of the desired acid, either neat or in a suitable inert solvent. Examples of pharmaceutically acceptable acid addition salts include those derived from inorganic acids like hydrochloric, hydrobromic, nitric, carbonic, monohydrogencarbonic, phosphoric, monohydrogenphosphoric, dihydrogenphosphoric, sulfuric, monohydrogensulfuric, hydriodic, or phosphorous acids and the like, as well as the salts derived from relatively nontoxic organic acids like acetic, propionic, isobutyric, maleic, malonic, benzoic, succinic, suberic, fumaric, lactic, mandelic, phthalic, benzenesulfonic, p-tolylsulfonic, citric, tartaric, methanesulfonic, and the like. Also included are salts of amino acids such as arginate and the like, and salts of organic acids like glucuronic or galactunoric acids and the like (see, for example, Berge et al., “Pharmaceutical Salts”, Journal of Pharmaceutical Science 66: 1-19 (1977)). Certain specific compounds of the invention contain both basic and acidic functionalities that allow the compounds to be converted into either base or acid addition salts.

The neutral forms of the compounds are preferably regenerated by contacting the salt with a base or acid and isolating the parent compounds in the conventional manner. The parent form of the compound differs from the various salt forms in certain physical properties, such as solubility in polar solvents.

In addition to salt forms, the present invention provides compounds which are in a prodrug form. Prodrugs of the compounds described herein readily undergo chemical changes under physiological conditions to provide the compounds of the invention. Additionally, prodrugs can be converted to the compounds of the invention by chemical or biochemical methods in an ex vivo environment.

Certain compounds of the invention can exist in unsolvated forms as well as solvated forms, including hydrated forms. In general, the solvated forms are equivalent to unsolvated forms and are encompassed within the scope of the present invention. Certain compounds of the invention may exist in multiple crystalline or amorphous forms.

Certain compounds of the invention possess asymmetric carbon atoms (optical centers) or double bonds; the racemates, diastereomers, geometric isomers and individual isomers are encompassed within the scope of the present invention. The graphic representations of racemic, ambiscalemic and scalemic or enantiomerically pure compounds used herein are taken from Maehr, J. Chem. Ed. 1985, 62: 114-120. Solid and broken wedges are used to denote the absolute configuration of a stereocenter unless otherwise noted. When the compounds described herein contain olefinic double bonds or other centers of geometric asymmetry, and unless specified otherwise, it is intended that the compounds include both E and Z geometric isomers. Likewise, all tautomeric forms are included.

Compounds of the invention can exist in particular geometric or stereoisomeric forms. The invention contemplates all such compounds, including cis- and trans-isomers, (−)- and (+)-enantiomers, (R)- and (S)-enantiomers, diastereomers, (D)-isomers, (L)-isomers, the racemic mixtures thereof, and other mixtures thereof, such as enantiomerically or diastereomerically enriched mixtures, as falling within the scope of the invention. Additional asymmetric carbon atoms can be present in a substituent such as an alkyl group. All such isomers, as well as mixtures thereof, are intended to be included in this invention.

Optically active (R)- and (S)-isomers and d and l isomers can be prepared using chiral synthons or chiral reagents, or resolved using conventional techniques. If, for instance, a particular enantiomer of a compound of the present invention is desired, it can be prepared by asymmetric synthesis, or by derivatization with a chiral auxiliary, where the resulting diastereomeric mixture is separated and the auxiliary group cleaved to provide the pure desired enantiomers. Alternatively, where the molecule contains a basic functional group, such as an amino group, or an acidic functional group, such as a carboxyl group, diastereomeric salts can be formed with an appropriate optically active acid or base, followed by resolution of the diastereomers thus formed by fractional crystallization or chromatographic means known in the art, and subsequent recovery of the pure enantiomers. In addition, separation of enantiomers and diastereomers is frequently accomplished using chromatography employing chiral, stationary phases, optionally in combination with chemical derivatization (e.g., formation of carbamates from amines).

The compounds of the invention may also contain unnatural proportions of atomic isotopes at one or more of the atoms that constitute such compounds. For example, the compounds may be radiolabeled with radioactive isotopes, such as for example tritium (3H), iodine-125 (125I) or carbon-14 (14C). All isotopic variations of the compounds of the invention, whether radioactive or not, are intended to be encompassed within the scope of the present invention.

The term “pharmaceutically acceptable carrier” or “pharmaceutically acceptable vehicle” refers to any formulation or carrier medium that provides the appropriate delivery of an effective amount of an active agent as defined herein, does not interfere with the effectiveness of the biological activity of the active agent, and that is sufficiently non-toxic to the host or patient. Representative carriers include water, oils, both vegetable and mineral, cream bases, lotion bases, ointment bases and the like. These bases include suspending agents, thickeners, penetration enhancers, and the like. Their formulation is well known to those in the art of cosmetics and topical pharmaceuticals. Additional information concerning carriers can be found in Remington: The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 21st Ed., Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins (2005) which is incorporated herein by reference.

“Pharmaceutically acceptable topical carrier” and equivalent terms refer to pharmaceutically acceptable carriers, as described herein above, suitable for topical application. An inactive liquid or cream vehicle capable of suspending or dissolving the active agent(s), and having the properties of being nontoxic and non-inflammatory when applied to the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof is an example of a pharmaceutically-acceptable topical carrier. This term is specifically intended to encompass carrier materials approved for use in topical cosmetics as well.

The term “pharmaceutically acceptable additive” refers to preservatives, antioxidants, fragrances, emulsifiers, dyes and excipients known or used in the field of drug formulation and that do not unduly interfere with the effectiveness of the biological activity of the active agent, and that is sufficiently non-toxic to the host or patient. Additives for topical formulations are well-known in the art, and may be added to the topical composition, as long as they are pharmaceutically acceptable and not deleterious to the epithelial cells or their function. Further, they should not cause deterioration in the stability of the composition. For example, inert fillers, anti-irritants, tackifiers, excipients, fragrances, opacifiers, antioxidants, gelling agents, stabilizers, surfactant, emollients, coloring agents, preservatives, buffering agents, other permeation enhancers, and other conventional components of topical or transdermal delivery formulations as are known in the art.

The terms “enhancement,” “penetration enhancement” or “permeation enhancement” relate to an increase in the permeability of the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof to a drug, so as to increase the rate at which the drug permeates through the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof. The enhanced permeation effected through the use of such enhancers can be observed, for example, by measuring the rate of diffusion of the drug through animal skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof using a diffusion cell apparatus. A diffusion cell is described by Merritt et al. Diffusion Apparatus for Skin Penetration, J of Controlled Release, 1(1984) pp. 161-162. The term “permeation enhancer” or “penetration enhancer” intends an agent or a mixture of agents, which, alone or in combination, act to increase the permeability of the skin, nail, hair or hoof to a drug.

The term “excipients” is conventionally known to mean carriers, diluents and/or vehicles used in formulating drug formulations effective for the desired use.

The term “topical administration” refers to the application of a pharmaceutical agent to the external surface of the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof, such that the agent crosses the external surface of the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof and enters the underlying tissues. Topical administration includes application of the composition to intact skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof, or to a broken, raw or open wound of skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof. Topical administration of a pharmaceutical agent can result in a limited distribution of the agent to the skin and surrounding tissues or, when the agent is removed from the treatment area by the bloodstream, can result in systemic distribution of the agent.

The term “transdermal delivery” refers to the diffusion of an agent across the barrier of the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof resulting from topical administration or other application of a composition. The stratum corneum acts as a barrier and few pharmaceutical agents are able to penetrate intact skin. In contrast, the epidermis and dermis are permeable to many solutes and absorption of drugs therefore occurs more readily through skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof that is abraded or otherwise stripped of the stratum corneum to expose the epidermis. Transdermal delivery includes injection or other delivery through any portion of the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof or mucous membrane and absorption or permeation through the remaining portion. Absorption through intact skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof can be enhanced by placing the active agent in an appropriate pharmaceutically acceptable vehicle before application to the skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof. Passive topical administration may consist of applying the active agent directly to the treatment site in combination with emollients or penetration enhancers. As used herein, transdermal delivery is intended to include delivery by permeation through or past the integument, i.e. skin, nail, hair, claw or hoof.

The terms “effective amount” or a “therapeutically effective amount” of a drug or pharmacologically active agent refers to a nontoxic but sufficient amount of the drug or agent to provide the desired effect. In the oral dosage forms of the present disclosure, an “effective amount” of one active of the combination is the amount of that active that is effective to provide the desired effect when used in combination with the other active of the combination. The amount that is “effective” will vary from subject to subject, depending on the age and general condition of the individual, the particular active agent or agents, and the appropriate “effective” amount in any individual case may be determined by one of ordinary skill in the art using routine experimentation.

The phrases “active ingredient”, “therapeutic agent”, “active”, or “active agent” mean a chemical entity which can be effective in treating a targeted disorder, disease or condition.

The phrase “pharmaceutically acceptable” means moieties or compounds that are, within the scope of medical judgment, suitable for use in humans without causing undesirable biological effects such as undue toxicity, irritation, allergic response, and the like, for example.

The phrase “oral dosage form” means any pharmaceutical composition administered to a subject via the oral cavity. Exemplary oral dosage forms include tablets, capsules, films, powders, sachets, granules, solutions, solids, suspensions or as more than one distinct unit (e.g., granules, tablets, and/or capsules containing different actives) packaged together for co-administration, and other formulations known in the art. An oral dosage form can be one, two, three, four, five or six units. When the oral dosage form has multiple units, all of the units are contained within a single package, (e.g. a bottle or other form of packaging such as a blister pack). When the oral dosage form is a single unit, it may or may not be in a single package. In a preferred embodiment, the oral dosage form is one, two or three units. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the oral dosage form is one unit.

The phrase “unit”, as used herein, refers to the number of discrete objects to be administered which comprise the dosage form. In some embodiments, the dosage form includes a compound of the invention in one capsule. This is a single unit. In some embodiments, the dosage form includes a compound of the invention as part of a therapeutically effective dosage of a cream or ointment. This is also a single unit. In some embodiments, the dosage form includes a compound of the invention and another active ingredient contained within one capsule, or as part of a therapeutically effective dosage of a cream or ointment. This is a single unit, whether or not the interior of the capsule includes multiple discrete granules of the active ingredient. In some embodiments, the dosage form includes a compound of the invention in one capsule, and the active ingredient in a second capsule. This is a two unit dosage form, such as two capsules or tablets, and so such units are contained in a single package. Thus the term ‘unit’ refers to the object which is administered to the animal, not to the interior components of the object.

The term, “prodrug”, as defined herein, is a derivative of a parent drug molecule that exerts its pharmacological effect only after chemical and/or enzymatic conversion to its active form in vivo. Prodrugs include those designed to circumvent problems associated with delivery of the parent drug. This may be due to poor physicochemical properties, such as poor chemical stability or low aqueous solubility, and may also be due to poor pharmacokinetic properties, such as poor bioavailability or poor half-life. Thus, certain advantages of prodrugs may include improved chemical stability, absorption, and/or PK properties of the parent carboxylic acids. Prodrugs may also be used to make drugs more “patient friendly,” by minimizing the frequency (e.g., once daily) or route of dosing (e.g., oral), or to improve the taste or odor if given orally, or to minimize pain if given parenterally.

In some embodiments, the prodrugs are chemically more stable than the active drug, thereby improving formulation and delivery of the parent drug, compared to the drug alone.

Prodrugs for carboxylic acid analogs of the invention may include a variety of esters. In an exemplary embodiment, the pharmaceutical formulations of the invention include a carboxylic acid ester. In an exemplary embodiment, the prodrug is suitable for treatment/prevention of those diseases and conditions that require the drug molecule to cross the blood brain barrier. In an exemplary embodiment, the prodrug enters the brain, where it is converted into the active form of the drug molecule. In one embodiment, a prodrug is used to enable an active drug molecule to reach the inside of the eye after topical application of the prodrug to the eye. Additionally, a prodrug can be converted to its parent compound by chemical or biochemical methods in an ex vivo environment. For example, a prodrug can be slowly converted to its parent compound when placed in a transdermal patch reservoir with a suitable enzyme or chemical reagent.

“Antibiotic”, as used herein, is a compound which can kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. The term antibiotic is broad enough to encompass acids, bases, salt forms (such as pharmaceutically acceptable salts), prodrugs, solvates and hydrates of the antibiotic compound.

The term “microbial infection” or “infection by a microorganism” refers to any infection of a host by an infectious agent including, but not limited to, viruses, bacteria, mycobacteria, fungus and parasites (see, e.g., Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, pp. 93-98 (Wilson et al., eds., 12th ed. 1991); Williams et al., J. of Medicinal Chem. 42:1481-1485 (1999), herein each incorporated by reference in their entirety).

“Biological medium,” as used herein refers to both in vitro and in vivo biological milieus. Exemplary in vitro “biological media” include, but are not limited to, cell culture, tissue culture, homogenates, plasma and blood. In vivo applications are generally performed in mammals, preferably humans.

“Inhibiting” and “blocking,” are used interchangeably herein to refer to the partial or full blockade of an enzyme, such as ROCK1.

The term “leaving group” means a functional group or atom which can be displaced by another functional group or atom in a substitution reaction, such as a nucleophilic substitution reaction. By way of example, representative leaving groups include triflate, chloro, bromo and iodo groups; sulfonic ester groups, such as mesylate, tosylate, brosylate, nosylate and the like; and acyloxy groups, such as acetoxy, trifluoroacetoxy and the like.

The term “amino-protecting group” means a protecting group suitable for preventing undesired reactions at an amino nitrogen. Representative amino-protecting groups include, but are not limited to, formyl; acyl groups, for example alkanoyl groups, such as acetyl, trichloroacetyl or trifluoroacetyl; alkoxycarbonyl groups, such as tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc); arylmethoxycarbonyl groups, such as benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz) and 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc); arylmethyl groups, such as benzyl (Bn), trityl (Tr), and 1,1-di-(4′-methoxyphenyl)methyl; silyl groups, such as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS); and the like.

The term “hydroxy-protecting group” means a protecting group suitable for preventing undesired reactions at a hydroxy group. Representative hydroxy-protecting groups include, but are not limited to, alkyl groups, such as methyl, ethyl, and tert-butyl; acyl groups, for example alkanoyl groups, such as acetyl; arylmethyl groups, such as benzyl (Bn), p-methoxybenzyl (PMB), 9-fluorenylmethyl (Fm), and diphenylmethyl (benzhydryl, DPM); silyl groups, such as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS); and the like.

Boron is able to form dative bonds with oxygen, sulfur or nitrogen under some circumstances in this invention. Dative bonds are usually weaker than covalent bonds. In situations where a boron is covalently bonded to at least one oxygen, sulfur or nitrogen, and is at the same time datively bonded to an oxygen, sulfur or nitrogen, respectively, the dative bond and covalent bond between the boron and the two identical heteroatoms can interconvert or be in the form of a resonance hybrid. There is potential uncertainty surrounding the exact nature and extent of electron sharing in these situations. The structures supplied are not intended to include any and all possible bonding scenarios between boron and the atom to which it is bound. Non limiting examples of these bonds are as follows:

“Salt counterion”, as used herein, refers to positively charged ions that associate with a compound of the invention when the boron is fully negatively or partially negatively charged. Examples of salt counterions include H+, H3O+, ammonium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and sodium.

The compounds comprising a boron bonded to a carbon and three heteroatoms (such as three oxygens described in this section) can optionally contain a fully negatively charged boron or partially negatively charged boron, due to the nature of the dative bond between the boron and one of the oxygens. Due to the negative charge, a positively charged counterion may associate with this compound, thus forming a salt. Examples of positively charged counterions include H+, H3O+, calcium, sodium, ammonium, potassium. The salts of these compounds are implicitly contained in descriptions of these compounds.

The present invention also encompasses compounds that are poly- or multi-valent species, including, for example, species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers and higher homologs of the compounds of use in the invention or reactive analogues thereof. For example, dimers of oxaboroles can form under the following conditions:

The present invention also encompasses compounds that are anhydrides of the cyclic boronic esters are synthesized by subjecting these compounds to dehydrating conditions. Examples of these anhydrides are provided below:

Trimers of the compounds of the invention are also produced. For example, trimers of acyclic boronic esters can be formed as follows:

Polymers of the compounds of the invention are also produced through the removal of certain protecting groups in strong acid. For example, trimers of acyclic boronic esters can be formed as follows:

Also of use in the present invention are compounds that are poly- or multi-valent species, including, for example, species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers and higher homologs of the compounds of use in the invention or reactive analogues thereof. The poly- and multi-valent species can be assembled from a single species or more than one species of the invention. For example, a dimeric construct can be “homo-dimeric” or “heterodimeric.” Moreover, poly- and multi-valent constructs in which a compound of the invention or a reactive analogue thereof, is attached to an oligomeric or polymeric framework (e.g., polylysine, dextran, hydroxyethyl starch and the like) are within the scope of the present invention. The framework is preferably polyfunctional (i.e. having an array of reactive sites for attaching compounds of use in the invention). Moreover, the framework can be derivatized with a single species of the invention or more than one species of the invention.

Moreover, the present invention includes the use of compounds within the motif set forth in the formulae contained herein, which are functionalized to afford compounds having water-solubility that is enhanced relative to analogous compounds that are not similarly functionalized. Thus, any of the substituents set forth herein can be replaced with analogous radicals that have enhanced water solubility. For example, it is within the scope of the invention to replace a hydroxyl group with a diol, or an amine with a quaternary amine, hydroxy amine or similar more water-soluble moiety. In a preferred embodiment, additional water solubility is imparted by substitution at a site not essential for the activity towards the editing domain of the compounds set forth herein with a moiety that enhances the water solubility of the parent compounds. Methods of enhancing the water-solubility of organic compounds are known in the art. Such methods include, but are not limited to, functionalizing an organic nucleus with a permanently charged moiety, e.g., quaternary ammonium, or a group that is charged at a physiologically relevant pH, e.g. carboxylic acid, amine. Other methods include, appending to the organic nucleus hydroxyl- or amine-containing groups, e.g. alcohols, polyols, polyethers, and the like. Representative examples include, but are not limited to, polylysine, polyethyleneimine, poly(ethyleneglycol) and poly(propyleneglycol). Suitable functionalization chemistries and strategies for these compounds are known in the art. See, for example, Dunn, R. L., et al., Eds. POLYMERIC DRUGS AND DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, ACS Symposium Series Vol. 469, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. 1991.

II. Introduction

The present invention has multiple aspects. These aspects include inventions directed to compounds, pharmaceutical formulations, methods of treating a condition, enhancing an effect, increasing the production of a cytokine and/or chemokine, decreasing the production of a cytokine and/or chemokine, increasing the release of a cytokine and/or chemokine, decreasing the release of a cytokine and/or chemokine, or inhibiting a phosphodiesterase.

III. Compounds

IIIa.

In a first aspect, the invention provides a compound of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound of the invention which is described in Example 1. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is a member selected from T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.
In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.
In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.
In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.
In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.
In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.
In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy.
In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is selected from the group consisting of


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy, or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is selected from the group consisting of


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is selected from the group consisting of


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is selected from the group consisting of


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound has a structure which is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Br. In an exemplary embodiment, R is Cl. In an exemplary embodiment, R is F. In an exemplary embodiment, R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of

In another exemplary embodiment, the invention provides poly- or multi-valent species of the compounds of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a dimer of a compound of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a dimer of a compound described herein.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides an anhydride of a compound of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides an anhydride of a compound described herein.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a trimer of a compound of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a trimer of a compound described herein.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound described herein, or a salt, hydrate or solvate thereof, or a combination thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound described herein, or a salt, hydrate or solvate thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound described herein, or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the salt is a pharmaceutically acceptable salt. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound described herein, or a hydrate thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound described herein, or a solvate thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound described herein, or a prodrug thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a salt of a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a pharmaceutically acceptable salt of a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a hydrate of a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a solvate of a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a prodrug of a compound described herein.

In an exemplary embodiment, alkyl is linear alkyl. In an exemplary embodiment, alkyl is branched alkyl. In an exemplary embodiment, heteroalkyl is linear heteroalkyl. In an exemplary embodiment, heteroalkyl is branched heteroalkyl.

III.b) Preparation of Boron-Containing Compounds

Compounds of use in the present invention can be prepared using commercially available starting materials or known intermediates. Compounds of use in the present invention can be prepared using synthetic methods known in the art or described herein.

The following exemplary schemes illustrate methods of preparing boron-containing molecules of the present invention. These methods are not limited to producing the compounds shown, but can be used to prepare a variety of molecules such as the compounds and complexes described herein. The compounds of the present invention can also be synthesized by methods not explicitly illustrated in the schemes but are well within the skill of one in the art. The compounds can be prepared using readily available materials of known intermediates.

Compounds described herein can be converted into hydrates and solvates by methods similar to those described herein.

III.c) Combinations comprising Additional Therapeutic Agents

The compounds of the invention may also be used in combination with additional therapeutic agents. The invention thus provides, in a further aspect, a combination comprising a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof together with at least one additional therapeutic agent. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is a compound of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent includes a boron atom. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent does not contain a boron atom. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is a compound described in sections III a)-b). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound described herein is

When a compound of the invention is used in combination with a second therapeutic agent active against the same disease state, the dose of each compound may differ from that when the compound is used alone. Appropriate doses will be readily appreciated by those skilled in the art. It will be appreciated that the amount of a compound of the invention required for use in treatment will vary with the nature of the condition being treated and the age and the condition of the patient and will be ultimately at the discretion of the attendant physician or veterinarian. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is a ROCK1 inhibitor or a ROCK2 inhibitor or an AAK1 inhibitor. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is fasudil or hydroxyfasudil or Y27632 or H-1152P or SB-72077-B or Bayer Azaindole-1 or Y-39983 or RKI-983 or INS-117548. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is Trusopt or Xalcom or Xalatan or Travatan or Lumigan or Combigan or Cosopt. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is a topical beta-antagonist. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is timoptic or betoptic or optipranolol or ocupress. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is a topical prostaglandin. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is Xalatan or Rescula or Travatan or Lumigan. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is an alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonists. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is Alphagan or Iopidine or Propine. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is Trusopt or Azopt. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is a topical miotic. In an exemplary embodiment, the additional therapeutic agent is physostigmine or carbacol or piolocarpine.

The individual components of such combinations may be administered either simultaneously or sequentially in a unit dosage form. The unit dosage form may be a single or multiple unit dosage forms. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a combination in a single unit dosage form. An example of a single unit dosage form is a capsule wherein both the compound of the invention and the additional therapeutic agent are contained within the same capsule. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a combination in a two unit dosage form. An example of a two unit dosage form is a first capsule which contains the compound of the invention and a second capsule which contains the additional therapeutic agent. Thus the term ‘single unit’ or ‘two unit’ or ‘multiple unit’ refers to the object which the patient ingests, not to the interior components of the object. Appropriate doses of known therapeutic agents will be readily appreciated by those skilled in the art.

The combinations referred to herein may conveniently be presented for use in the form of a pharmaceutical formulation. Thus, an exemplary embodiment of the invention is a pharmaceutical formulation comprising a) a compound of the invention; b) an additional therapeutic agent and c) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In an exemplary embodiment, the pharmaceutical formulation is a unit dosage form. In an exemplary embodiment, the pharmaceutical formulation is a single unit dosage form. In an exemplary embodiment, the pharmaceutical formulation is a two unit dosage form. In an exemplary embodiment, the pharmaceutical formulation is a two unit dosage form comprising a first unit dosage form and a second unit dosage form, wherein the first unit dosage form includes a) a compound of the invention and b) a first pharmaceutically acceptable excipient; and the second unit dosage form includes c) an additional therapeutic agent and d) a second pharmaceutically acceptable excipient.

IV. The-Methods

a) Kinases

In another aspect, the invention provides a method for inhibiting a kinase, the method comprising: contacting the kinase with a compound of the invention, wherein the kinase is inhibited. In an exemplary embodiment, the kinase includes a hinge region. In an exemplary embodiment, the kinase is a serine/threonine kinase. In an exemplary embodiment, the kinase is an ACG kinase. In an exemplary embodiment, the kinase is a Rho kinase. In an exemplary embodiment, the kinase is ROCK1. In an exemplary embodiment, the kinase is ROCK2. In an exemplary embodiment, the kinase is a NAK kinase. In an exemplary embodiment, the kinase is AAK1. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the amount is a therapeutically effective amount. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is according to a formula described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is (D37) or (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of


In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the Compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


b) Decreasing the Production of a Cytokine and/or Chemokine

In another aspect, the invention provides a method for decreasing the production of a cytokine and/or a chemokine, the method comprising: contacting a cell with a compound of the invention, wherein production of the cytokine and/or chemokine by the cell is decreased. In another aspect, the invention provides a method for decreasing the production of a cytokine and/or a chemokine, the method comprising: contacting a cell with a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein production of the cytokine and/or chemokine by the cell is decreased. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the cell is contacted with a therapeutically effective amount of the compound. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is according to a formula described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is (D37) or (D107).

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the production of a cytokine, which is a TH1 cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the TH1 cytokine is IFN-γ or IL-2.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the production of a cytokine, which is a TH2 cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the TH2 cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the production of a cytokine, wherein said cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, IL-7, IL-9, IL-12, IL-17, IL-18, IL-23, TNF-α, LT, LIF, Oncostatin, IFNα, IFNβ and IFN-γ. In another exemplary embodiment, the cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, IL-7, IL-9, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, LT, LIF, Oncostatin, and IFN-γ. In another exemplary embodiment, the cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-23, TNF-α and IFN-γ. In another exemplary embodiment, the cytokine is TNF-α.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the release of a cytokine, wherein said cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α and IFN-γ.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the production of a cytokine, wherein said cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, W-13 and TGF-β.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the production of a chemokine, wherein said chemokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-8, Gro-α, MIP-1, MCP-1, PGE2, ENA-78, and RANTES. In an exemplary embodiment, the chemokine is MCP-1 or PGE2.

In an exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, the compound of the invention is present in an amount which will inhibit the production of a cytokine and/or a chemokine by at least about 5 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 100%, 40 to about 100%, or at least about 50 to about 100%, or at least about 60 to about 100%, or at least about 70 to about 100%, or at least about 80 to about 100%, or at least about 90 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 70%, or at least about 40 to about 90%, or at least about 45 to about 80%, or at least about 55 to about 75%, or at least about 75 to about 98%, or at least about 55 to about 99%, or at least about 5% to about 20% or at least about 10% to about 25%. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein.

c) Increasing the Production of A Cytokine and/or A Chemokine

In another aspect, the invention provides a method for increasing the production of a cytokine and/or a chemokine, the method comprising: contacting a cell with a compound of the invention, wherein production of the cytokine and/or chemokine by the cell is increased. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the cell is contacted with a therapeutically effective amount of the compound. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is according to a formula described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is (D37) or (D107).

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for increasing the production of a cytokine, which is a TH1 cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the TH1 cytokine is IFN-γ or IL-2.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for increasing the production of a cytokine, which is a TH2 cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the TH2 cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for increasing the production of a cytokine, wherein said cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, W-13 and TGF-β.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for increasing the production of a chemokine, wherein said chemokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-8, Gro-α, MIP-1, MCP-1, PGE2, ENA-78, and RANTES. In an exemplary embodiment, the chemokine is MCP-1 or PGE2.

In an exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, the compound of the invention is present in an amount which will increase the production of a cytokine and/or a chemokine by at least about 5 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 100%, 40 to about 100%, or at least about 50 to about 100%, or at least about 60 to about 100%, or at least about 70 to about 100%, or at least about 80 to about 100%, or at least about 90 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 70%, or at least about 40 to about 90%, or at least about 45 to about 80%, or at least about 55 to about 75%, or at least about 75 to about 98%, or at least about 55 to about 99%, or at least about 5% to about 20% or at least about 10% to about 25%. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein.

d) Decreasing the Release of A Cytokine and/or Chemokine

In another aspect, the invention provides a method for decreasing the release of a cytokine and/or a chemokine, the method comprising: contacting a cell with a compound of the invention, wherein the release of the cytokine and/or chemokine by the cell is decreased. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. The compound of the invention is a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the cell is contacted with a therapeutically effective amount of the compound. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is according to a formula described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is (D37) or (D107).

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the release of a cytokine, which is a TH1 cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the TH1 cytokine is IFN-γ or IL-2.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the release of a cytokine, which is a TH2 cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the TH2 cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the release of a cytokine, wherein said cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, IL-7, IL-9, IL-12, IL-17, IL-18, IL-23, TNF-α, LT, LIF, Oncostatin, IFNα, IFNβ and IFN-γ. In another exemplary embodiment, the cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, IL-7, IL-9, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, LT, LIF, Oncostatin, and IFN-γ. In another exemplary embodiment, the cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-23, TNF-α and IFN-γ. In another exemplary embodiment, the cytokine is TNF-α.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the release of a cytokine, wherein said cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α and IFN-γ.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention decreases the release of a member selected from the group consisting of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α and IFN-γ.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the release of a cytokine, wherein said cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, W-13 and TGF-β.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for decreasing the release of a chemokine, wherein said chemokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-8, Gro-α, MIP-1, MCP-1, PGE2, ENA-78, and RANTES. In an exemplary embodiment, the chemokine is MCP-1 or PGE2.

In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention decreases the release of a member selected from the group consisting of TNF-α, IL-2, IFNγ, IL-5, and IL-10, and does not substantially decrease the release of a member selected from the group consisting of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound decreases the release of IL-12 or IL-23.

In an exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, the compound of the invention is present in an amount which will decrease the release of a cytokine and/or a chemokine by at least about 5 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 100%, 40 to about 100%, or at least about 50 to about 100%, or at least about 60 to about 100%, or at least about 70 to about 100%, or at least about 80 to about 100%, or at least about 90 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 70%, or at least about 40 to about 90%, or at least about 45 to about 80%, or at least about 55 to about 75%, or at least about 75 to about 98%, or at least about 55 to about 99%, or at least about 5% to about 20% or at least about 10% to about 25%. In another exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

e) Increasing the Release of A Cytokine and/or A Chemokine

In another aspect, the invention provides a method for increasing the production of a cytokine and/or a chemokine, the method comprising: contacting a cell with a compound of the invention, wherein release of the cytokine and/or chemokine by the cell is increased. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the cell is contacted with a therapeutically effective amount of the compound. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is according to a formula described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is (D37) or (D107).

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for increasing the release of a cytokine, which is a TH1 cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the TH1 cytokine is IFN-γ or IL-2.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for increasing the release of a cytokine, which is a TH2 cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the TH2 cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for increasing the release of a cytokine, wherein said cytokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, W-13 and TGF-β.

In an exemplary embodiment, the method is for increasing the release of a chemokine, wherein said chemokine is selected from the group consisting of IL-8, Gro-α, MIP-1, MCP-1, PGE2, ENA-78, and RANTES. In an exemplary embodiment, the chemokine is MCP-1 or PGE2.

In an exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, the compound of the invention is present in an amount which will increase release of a cytokine and/or a chemokine by at least about 5 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 100%, 40 to about 100%, or at least about 50 to about 100%, or at least about 60 to about 100%, or at least about 70 to about 100%, or at least about 80 to about 100%, or at least about 90 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 70%, or at least about 40 to about 90%, or at least about 45 to about 80%, or at least about 55 to about 75%, or at least about 75 to about 98%, or at least about 55 to about 99%, or at least about 5% to about 20% or at least about 10% to about 25%. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof

f) Inhibiting A Phosphodiesterase

In another aspect, the invention provides a method for inhibiting a phosphodiesterase (PDE), the method comprising: contacting the phosphodiesterase with a compound of the invention, wherein the phosphodiesterase is inhibited. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is (D37) or (D107).

In an exemplary embodiment, the phosphodiesterase is selected from the group consisting of PDE1, PDE2, PDE3, PDE4, PDE5, PDE6, PDE7, PDE8, PDE9, PDE10 and PDE11. In an exemplary embodiment, the phosphodiesterase is PDE4. In an exemplary embodiment, the PDE4 is a member selected from PDE4A, PDE4B, PDE4C and PDE4D. In an exemplary embodiment, the PDE4 is PDE4B. In an exemplary embodiment, the phosphodiesterase is PDE7.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method for inhibiting a phosphodiesterase4 (PDE4), but not significantly inhibiting at least one PDE which is selected from the group consisting of PDE1, PDE2, PDE3, PDE5 and PDE6, involving contacting a cell with a compound of the invention, thereby providing said inhibition.

In an exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, the of the invention, or a compound described by a formula presented herein, is present in an amount which will inhibit a phosphodiesterase described herein by at least about 5 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 100%, 40 to about 100%, or at least about 50 to about 100%, or at least about 60 to about 100%, or at least about 70 to about 100%, or at least about 80 to about 100%, or at least about 90 to about 100%, or at least about 30 to about 70%, or at least about 40 to about 90%, or at least about 45 to about 80%, or at least about 55 to about 75%, or at least about 75 to about 98%, or at least about 55 to about 99%, or at least about 5% to about 20% or at last about 10% to about 25%. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof

g) Conditions and Effects

In another aspect, the invention provides a method of treating and/or preventing a condition, or enhancing an effect, in an animal, the method comprising administering to the animal an amount of a compound of the invention, thereby treating or preventing the condition. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is a disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the amount is a therapeutically effective amount. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is (D37) or (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of glaucoma, cardiovascular disease, cancer, neuronal degeneration, kidney failure, asthma, osteoporosis, erectile dysfunction, insulin resistance, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), cerebral vasospasm, angina and restenosis. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is cardiovascular disease, and said cardiovascular disease is cardiac hypertrophy or cardiac fibrosis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is an ophthamological disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the glaucoma is selected from the group consisting of a primary glaucoma, a developmental glaucoma, a secondary glaucoma and absolute glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, glaucoma is selected from the group consisting of primary open-angle glaucoma (chronic open-angle glaucoma, chronic simple glaucoma or glaucoma simplex), low-tension glaucoma or primary angle-closure glaucoma (primary closed-angle glaucoma, narrow-angle glaucoma, pupil-block glaucoma or acute congestive glaucoma). In an exemplary embodiment, the glaucoma is selected from the group consisting of an acute angle-closure glaucoma or chronic angle-closure glaucoma or intermittent angle-closure glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the developmental glaucoma is selected from the group consisting of primary congential glaucoma or infantile glaucoma or hereditary glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the secondary glaucoma is selected from the group consisting of inflammatory glaucoma, phacogenic glaucoma, glaucoma secondary to intraocular hemorrhage, traumatic glaucoma, neovascular glaucoma, drug-induced glaucoma and toxic glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the drug-induced glaucoma is corticosteroid induced glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the glaucoma is pigmentary glaucoma or exfoliation glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the glaucoma is inflammatory glaucoma, and said inflammatory glaucoma is uveitis or Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of dry eye disease, dry eye—keratoconjunctivitis sicca, allergic conjunctivitis, optic neuritis, retinal ischemia, diabetic retinopathy, laser induced optic damage, surgery or trauma-induced proliferative vitreoretinopathy, optic nerve degeneration secondary to glaucoma, optic nerve degeneration with normal intra-ocular pressure, macular degeneration, retinal neo-vacularization, wet-macular degeneration, or dry-macular degeneration. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is anterior chamber uveitis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of coronary angina, cerebral vasospasm, asthma, peripheral vascular diseases especially secondary to diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of tumor cell metastasis, hypertension, vasospasm and bronchial asthma.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is an inflammatory-related condition. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition involves the increase of production of a cytokine and/or a chemokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition involves the decrease of production of a cytokine and/or a chemokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition involves the increase of release of a cytokine and/or a chemokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition involves the decrease of release of a cytokine and/or a chemokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition involves the inhibition of a phosphodiesterase. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is in an amount sufficient to treat the inflammatory-related disease by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine expression or by stimulating anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, but the amount is less than sufficient to substantially inhibit cyclin dependent kinases. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is mediated by a cytokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is mediated by a chemokine. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is mediated by a neutrophil. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is mediated by a phosphodiesterase. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is mediated by a phosphodiesterase4. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is mediated by a phosphodiesterase7.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriatic arthritis, traumatic arthritis, rubella arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, graft versus host disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, toxic shock syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, muscle degeneration, allograft rejections, pancreatitis, insulinitis, glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, renal fibrosis, chronic renal failure, gout, leprosy, acute synovitis, Reiter's syndrome, gouty arthritis, Behcet's disease, spondylitis, endometriosis, non-articular inflammatory conditions, such as intervertbral disk syndrome conditions, bursitis, tendonitis, tenosynovitis or fibromyalgic syndrome; and acute or chronic pain, including but not limited to neurological pain, neuropathies, polyneuropathies, diabetes-related polyneuropathies, trauma, migraine, tension and cluster headache, Horton's disease, varicose ulcers, neuralgias, musculo-skeletal pain, osteo-traumatic pain, fractures, algodystrophy, spondylarthritis, fibromyalgia, phantom limb pain, back pain, vertebral pain, post-surgery pain, herniated intervertebral disc-induced sciatica, cancer-related pain, vascular pain, visceral pain, childbirth, or HIV-related pain. Other cytokine mediated diseases are allergy, a metabolic disease, a chemotherapy/radiation related complication; diabetes type I; diabetes type II; a liver disease; a gastrointestinal disorder; diabetic retinopathy; Sjogren's syndrome; a pulmonary disorder, a renal disease; dermatitis; HIV-related cachexia; cerebral malaria; ankylosing spondolytis; leprosy; anemia; fibromyalgia, kidney failure, stroke, chronic heart failure, endotoxemia, reperfusion injury, ischemia reperfusion, myocardial ischemia, restenosis, thrombosis, angiogenesis, Coronary Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease, acute coronary syndrome, Takayasu arteritis, cardiac failure such as heart failure, aortic valve stenosis, cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, vasculitis, vascular restenosis, valvular disease or coronary artery bypass; hypercholesteremia, diseases or conditions related to blood coagulation or fibrinolysis, such as for example, acute venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, thrombosis during pregnancy, hemorrhagic skin necrosis, acute or chronic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), clot formation from surgery, long bed rest or long periods of immobilization, venous thrombosis, fulminant meningococcemia, acute thrombotic strokes, acute coronary occlusion, acute peripheral arterial occlusion, massive pulmonary embolism, axillary vein thrombosis, massive iliofemoral vein thrombosis, occluded arterial or venous cannulae, cardiomyopathy, venoocclusive disease of the liver, hypotension, decreased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, pulmonary hypertension, diminished lung compliance, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia; or atherosclerosis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of allergic rhinitis, asthma, adult respiratory distress syndrome, chronic pulmonary inflammation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, bronchitis, mucus hypersecretion, silicosis, SARS infection and respiratory tract inflammation.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of psoriasis, eczema, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis and acne.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of Guillain-Barre syndrome, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases, viral and bacterial meningitis, CNS trauma, spinal cord injury, seizures, convulsions, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, AIDS dementia complex, MERRF and MELAS syndromes, Leber's disease, Wemicke's encephalophathy, Rett syndrome, homocysteinuria, hyperprolinemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, nonketotic hyperglycinemia, hydroxybutyric aminoaciduria, sulfite oxidase deficiency, combined systems disease, lead encephalopathy, Tourett's syndrome, hepatic encephalopathy, drug addiction, drug tolerance, drug dependency, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, aneurism and epilepsy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of bone resorption diseases, osteopetrosis, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of diabetes, systemic cachexia, cachexia secondary to infection or malignancy, cachexia secondary to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), obesity, anorexia and bulimia nervosa. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of sepsis, HIV, HCV, malaria, infectious arthritis, leishmaniasis, Lyme disease, cancer, including but not limited to breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, prostatic cancer, multiple myeloma, acute myelogenous leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, or follicular lymphoma, Castleman's disease, and drug resistance.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of bronchial asthma, rhinitis, influenza, stroke, myocardial infarction, thermal injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiple organ injury secondary to trauma, acute glomerulonephritis, dermatoses with acute inflammatory components, acute purulent meningitis, hemodialysis, leukopheresis, granulocyte transfusion associated syndromes, and necrotizing enterocolitis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), neurodegenerative disorder, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis, and metabolic disease (the metabolic syndrome and diabetes) as well as infection-related inflammation. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is a neurodegenerative disorder which is Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is inflammatory bowel disease which is selected from the group consisting of: Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is a gastrointestinal complication. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is diarrhea. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is celiac disease or non-specific colitis. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is a liver disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of an autoimmune hepatitis, hepatitis C, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and fulminant liver failure. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is a bone disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is osteoporosis. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is a pulmonary disorder. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is selected from the group consisting of allergic rhinitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic granulomatous inflammation, cystic fibrosis, and sarcoidosis. In an exemplary embodiment, condition is cardiovascular disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the cardiovascular disease is selected from the group consisting of atheroscleotic cardiac disease, congestive heart failure and restenosis. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is a renal disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is glomerulpnephritis or vasculitis. In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is post-radiotherapy related disease or atherosclerosis. In yet another embodiment the condition is atopic dermatitis. In yet another embodiment the condition is actinic keratosis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the PDE4 inhibition is treating and/or preventing a disorder, and the disorder is selected from the group consisting of psoriasis, inflammatory arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, chronic bronchitis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), atopic dermatitis, urticaria, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, vernal conjunctivitis, colitis, esoniophilic granuloma, septic shock, reperfusion injury of the myocardium, reperfusion injury of the brain, chronic glomerulonephritis, endotoxic shock, adult respiratory distress syndrome, cystic fibrosis, arterial restenosis, artherosclerosis, keratosis, rheumatoid spondylitis, osteoarthritis, pyresis, diabetes mellitus, pneumoconiosis, chronic obstructive airways disease, toxic contact eczema, allergic contact eczema, atopic eczema, seborrheic eczema, lichen simplex, sunburn, pruritus in the anogenital area, alopecia greata, hypertrophic scars, discoid lupus erythematosus, systemic lupus erythematosus, follicular pyodermias, wide-area pyodermias, endogenous acne, exogenous acne, acne rosacea, Behcet's disease, anaphylactoid purpura nephritis, leukemia, multiple sclerosis, gastrointestinal disease and autoimmune disease. In an exemplary embodiment, the colitis is selected from the group consisting of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's colitis, diversion colitis, ischemic colitis, infectious colitis, fulminant colitis, chemical colitis, microscopic colitis, lymphocytic colitis, and atypical colitis. In an exemplary embodiment, the colitis is ulcerative colitis or Crohn's colitis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the condition is psoriasis. In an exemplary embodiment, psoriasis is selected from the group consisting of plaque psoriasis, flexural psoriasis (inverse psoriasis), guttate psoriasis, pustular psoriasis, nail psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and erythrodermic psoriasis. In an exemplary embodiment, the psoriasis is plaque psoriasis or nail psoriasis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the disorder is cognition impairment or decline or memory impairment. In an exemplary embodiment, the memory impairment is due to dementia. In an exemplary embodiment, the patient is suffering from memory impairment due to Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Pick's disease, Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, depression, aging, head trauma, stroke, CNS hypoxia, cerebral senility, multiinfarct dementia, an acute neuronal disease, age-related cognitive decline, HIV or a cardiovascular disease.

In an exemplary embodiment, the PDE4 inhibition is enhancing an effect, wherein the enhanced effect is cognition or memory.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method for stimulating ovarian follicular growth in a female, comprising administering to a female a medicament comprising a compound of the invention, whereby ovarian follicular growth is stimulated in the female. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the female is undergoing ovulation induction. In an exemplary embodiment, the female is undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. In an exemplary embodiment, the medicament is administered simultaneously, separately or sequentially with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), or an agent having FSH activity, or an agent that stimulates endogenous FSH release.

The invention also provides a method of treating an inflammatory-related disease associated with cytokine expression levels, which comprises administering to an animal in need of such treatment the compound of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is according to a formula described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of treating or preventing an inflammatory-related disease in an animal, the method comprising administering to the animal a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, wherein the compound is in an amount sufficient to treat the inflammatory-related disease by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine expression or by stimulating anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, but the amount is less than sufficient to substantially inhibit cyclin dependent kinases. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method for inhibiting the production of an inflammatory cytokine by cells capable of producing the inflammatory cytokine, the method comprises contacting a cell with a therapeutic amount of compound of the invention, wherein production of the inflammatory cytokine by the cells is inhibited. In an exemplary embodiment, the therapeutic amount is sufficient to inhibit the production of the inflammatory cytokine protein between about 50% and about 99%.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method for inhibiting an inflammatory response in an animal, the method comprising: contacting the animal with a therapeutic amount of a compound of the invention, wherein the inflammatory response is inhibited.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of treating glaucoma, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, thereby treating glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of treating glaucoma, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound described herein, thereby treating glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of preventing glaucoma, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, thereby preventing glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of preventing glaucoma, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound described herein, thereby preventing glaucoma. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of reducing intra-ocular pressure, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, thereby reducing said intra-ocular pressure. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of reducing intra-ocular pressure, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound described herein, thereby reducing said intra-ocular pressure. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of treating and/or preventing ocular nerve neuropathy, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, thereby treating and/or preventing ocular nerve neuropathy. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of treating and/or preventing ocular nerve neuropathy, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound described herein, thereby treating and/or preventing ocular nerve neuropathy. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of reducing blood pressure, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, thereby reducing the blood pressure. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of reducing blood pressure, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, thereby reducing the blood pressure. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of reducing and/or preventing spasms in veins, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, thereby reducing and/or preventing spasms in veins. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of reducing and/or preventing spasms in veins, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound described herein, thereby reducing and/or preventing spasms in veins. In an exemplary embodiment, the spasms in the vein occur in the brain. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of reducing and/or preventing smooth muscle contraction, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of the invention, thereby reducing said smooth muscle contraction. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a method of reducing and/or preventing smooth muscle contraction, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a compound described herein, thereby reducing said smooth muscle contraction. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, the animal is a member selected from human, cattle, deer, reindeer, goat, honey bee, pig, sheep, horse, cow, bull, dog, guinea pig, gerbil, rabbit, cat, camel, yak, elephant, ostrich, otter, chicken, duck, goose, guinea fowl, pigeon, swan, and turkey. In another exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, the animal is a member selected from a human, cattle, goat, pig, sheep, horse, cow, bull, dog, guinea pig, gerbil, rabbit, cat, chicken and turkey. In another exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, the animal is a human.

In an exemplary embodiment, for any of the methods described herein, a compound of the invention and/or a pharmaceutical formulation described herein can be used.

In another exemplary embodiment, in any of the methods of treating/preventing a condition or enhancing an effect described herein, the animal being administered the compound of the invention is not otherwise in need of treatment with the compound of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is V. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is X. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is Y. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is Z. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is (D37) or (D107). In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is


In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is

In another exemplary embodiment, the condition is glaucoma, and the animal being administered the compound of the invention is not otherwise in need of treatment with the compound of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is T, or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is U, or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is V, or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is W, or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is X, or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is Y, or a salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is Z, or a salt thereof.

In another exemplary embodiment, in any of the methods of treating/preventing a condition or enhancing an effect described herein, the animal being administered the compound of the invention is not otherwise in need of treatment with a compound of the invention.

V. Pharmaceutical Formulations

In another aspect, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound of the invention; and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In another aspect, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is selected from the group consisting of T, U, V, W, X, Y and Z; and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In another aspect, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is T; and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In another aspect, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is W; and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In another aspect, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is X; and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In another aspect, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is Z; and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In another aspect, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is selected from the group consisting of (C21), (C23), (C24), (C50), (C57), (C75), (C77), (C78), (C80), (C88), (C97), (D37) and (D107); and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound of the invention is a compound described herein or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is


or a salt thereof and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is


or a salt thereof and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a pharmaceutical formulation comprising: (a) a compound which is


or a salt thereof and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient. In an exemplary embodiment, the compound is according to a formula described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, the formulation is a unit dosage form. In an exemplary embodiment, the formulation is an oral unit dosage form or a topical unit dosage form. In an exemplary embodiment, the topical unit dosage form is selected from the group consisting of a lotion, an ointment and a cream. In an exemplary embodiment, the formulation is for topical use. In an exemplary embodiment, the pharmaceutical formulations described herein can be used in a method described herein.

As described in detail herein, the pharmaceutical formulations of the invention may be specially formulated for administration in solid or liquid form, including those adapted for oral administration, e.g., tablets, drenches (aqueous or non-aqueous solutions or suspensions), parenteral administration (including intravenous and intramuscular), or epidural injection as, for example, a sterile solution or suspension, or sustained release formulation. The pharmaceutical formulations of the present invention may also be specifically formulated for administration transdermally.

The pharmaceutical formulations of the invention may be administered orally, parenterally, subcutaneously, transdermally, nasally, or by anal suppository. The pharmaceutical formulations of the invention may also be administered using controlled delivery devices.

Formulations of the present invention include those suitable for oral and parenteral administration, particularly intramuscular, intravenous and subcutaneous administration. The formulations may conveniently be presented in unit dosage form and may be prepared by any methods well known in the art of pharmacy. The amount of active ingredient which can be combined with a carrier material to produce a single dosage form will vary depending upon the host being treated and the particular mode of administration. The amount of active ingredient which can be combined with a carrier material to produce a single dosage form will generally be that amount of the compound which produces a therapeutic effect, without being toxic to the patient. Generally, out of one hundred percent, this amount will range from about 1 percent to about ninety-nine percent of active ingredient.

In certain embodiments, a formulation of the present invention comprises an excipient selected from the group consisting of cyclodextrins, liposomes, micelle forming agents, e.g., bile acids, and polymeric carriers, e.g., polyesters and polyanhydrides; and a compound of the present invention. In certain embodiments, an aforementioned formulation renders orally bioavailable a compound of the present invention.

Methods of preparing these formulations or compositions include the step of bringing into association a compound of the present invention with the carrier and, optionally, one or more accessory ingredients. In general, the formulations are prepared by uniformly and intimately bringing into association a compound of the present invention with liquid carriers, or finely divided solid carriers, or both, and then, if necessary, shaping the product.

Formulations of the invention suitable for oral administration may be in the form of capsules, cachets, pills, tablets, caplets, lozenges (using a flavored basis, usually sucrose and acacia or tragacanth), powders, granules, or as a solution or a suspension in an aqueous or non-aqueous liquid, or as an oil-in-water or water-in-oil liquid emulsion, or as an elixir or syrup, or as pastilles (using an inert base, such as gelatin and glycerin, or sucrose and acacia), each containing a predetermined amount of a compound of the present invention as an active ingredient. A compound of the present invention may also be administered as a bolus, electuary or paste.

In solid dosage forms of the invention for oral administration (capsules, tablets, caplets, pills, dragees, powders, granules and the like), the active ingredient is mixed with one or more pharmaceutically acceptable carriers, such as sodium citrate or dicalcium phosphate, and/or any of the following: (1) fillers or extenders, such as starches, lactose, sucrose, glucose, mannitol, and/or silicic acid; (2) binders, such as, for example, carboxymethylcellulose, alginates, gelatin, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, sucrose and/or acacia; (3) humectants, such as glycerol; (4) disintegrating agents, such as agar-agar, calcium carbonate, potato or tapioca starch, alginic acid, certain silicates, and sodium carbonate; (5) solution retarding agents, such as paraffin; (6) absorption accelerators, such as quaternary ammonium compounds; (7) wetting agents, such as, for example, cetyl alcohol, glycerol monostearate, and non-ionic surfactants; (8) absorbents, such as kaolin and bentonite clay; (9) lubricants, such a talc, calcium stearate, magnesium stearate, solid polyethylene glycols, sodium lauryl sulfate, and mixtures thereof; and (10) coloring agents. In the case of capsules, tablets and pills, the pharmaceutical formulations may also comprise buffering agents. Solid formulations of a similar type may also be employed as fillers in soft and hard-shelled gelatin capsules using such excipients as lactose or milk sugars, as well as high molecular weight polyethylene glycols and the like.

A tablet may be made by compression or molding, optionally with one or more accessory ingredients. Compressed tablets may be prepared using binder (for example, gelatin or hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose), lubricant, inert diluent, preservative, disintegrant (for example, sodium starch glycolate or cross-linked sodium carboxymethyl cellulose), surface-active or dispersing agent. Molded tablets may be made by molding in a suitable machine a mixture of the powdered compound moistened with an inert liquid diluent.

The tablets, and other solid dosage forms of the pharmaceutical formulations of the invention, such as dragees, capsules, pills and granules, may optionally be scored or prepared with coatings and shells, such as enteric coatings and other coatings well known in the pharmaceutical-formulating art. They may also be formulated so as to provide slow or controlled release of the active ingredient therein using, for example, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose in varying proportions to provide the desired release profile, other polymer matrices, liposomes and/or microspheres. They may be formulated for rapid release, e.g., freeze-dried. They may be sterilized by, for example, filtration through a bacteria-retaining filter, or by incorporating sterilizing agents in the form of sterile solid compositions which can be dissolved in sterile water, or some other sterile injectable medium immediately before use. These formulations may also optionally contain opacifying agents and may be of a composition that they release the active ingredient(s) only, or preferentially, in a certain portion of the gastrointestinal tract, optionally, in a delayed manner. Examples of embedding formulations which can be used include polymeric substances and waxes. The active ingredient can also be in micro-encapsulated form, if appropriate, with one or more of the above-described excipients.

Liquid dosage forms for oral administration of the compounds of the invention include pharmaceutically acceptable emulsions, microemulsions, solutions, suspensions, syrups and elixirs. In addition to the active ingredient, the liquid dosage forms may contain inert diluents commonly used in the art, such as, for example, water or other solvents, solubilizing agents and emulsifiers, such as ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, ethyl carbonate, ethyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, benzyl benzoate, propylene glycol, 1,3-butylene glycol, oils (in particular, cottonseed, groundnut, corn, germ, olive, castor and sesame oils), glycerol, tetrahydrofuryl alcohol, polyethylene glycols and fatty acid esters of sorbitan, and mixtures thereof.

Besides inert diluents, the oral formulations can also include adjuvants such as wetting agents, emulsifying and suspending agents, sweetening, flavoring, coloring, perfuming and preservative agents.

Suspensions, in addition to the active compounds, may contain suspending agents as, for example, ethoxylated isostearyl alcohols, polyoxyethylene sorbitol and sorbitan esters, microcrystalline cellulose, aluminum metahydroxide, bentonite, agar-agar and tragacanth, and mixtures thereof.

Pharmaceutical formulations of the invention suitable for parenteral administration comprise one or more compounds of the invention in combination with one or more pharmaceutically-acceptable sterile isotonic aqueous or nonaqueous solutions, dispersions, suspensions or emulsions, or sterile powders which may be reconstituted into sterile injectable solutions or dispersions just prior to use, which may contain sugars, alcohols, antioxidants, buffers, bacteriostats, solutes which render the formulation isotonic with the blood of the intended recipient or suspending or thickening agents.

Examples of suitable aqueous and nonaqueous carriers which may be employed in the pharmaceutical formulations of the invention include water, ethanol, polyols (such as glycerol, propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, and the like), and suitable mixtures thereof, vegetable oils, such as olive oil, and injectable organic esters, such as ethyl oleate. Proper fluidity can be maintained, for example, by the use of coating materials, such as lecithin, by the maintenance of the required particle size in the case of dispersions, and by the use of surfactants.

These formulations may also contain adjuvants such as preservatives, wetting agents, emulsifying agents and dispersing agents. Prevention of the action of microorganisms upon the subject compounds may be ensured by the inclusion of various antibacterial and antifungal agents, for example, paraben, chlorobutanol, phenol sorbic acid, and the like. It may also be desirable to include isotonic agents, such as sugars, sodium chloride, and the like into the formulations. In addition, prolonged absorption of the injectable pharmaceutical form may be brought about by the inclusion of agents which delay absorption such as aluminum monostearate and gelatin.

In some cases, in order to prolong the effect of a drug, it is desirable to slow the absorption of the drug from subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. This may be accomplished by the use of a liquid suspension of crystalline or amorphous material having poor water solubility. The rate of absorption of the drug then depends upon its rate of dissolution which, in turn, may depend upon crystal size and crystalline form. Alternatively, delayed absorption of a parenterally-administered drug form is accomplished by dissolving or suspending the drug in an oil vehicle.

Injectable depot forms are made by forming microencapsule matrices of the subject compounds in biodegradable polymers such as polylactide-polyglycolide. Depending on the ratio of drug to polymer, and the nature of the particular polymer employed, the rate of drug release can be controlled. Examples of other biodegradable polymers include poly(orthoesters) and poly(anhydrides). Depot injectable formulations are also prepared by entrapping the drug in liposomes or microemulsions which are compatible with body tissue. Pharmaceutical formulations or unit dosage forms of the present invention in the form of prolonged-action tablets may comprise compressed tablets formulated to release the drug substance in a manner to provide medication over a period of time. There are a number of tablet types that include delayed-action tablets in which the release of the drug substance is prevented for an interval of time after administration or until certain physiological conditions exist. Repeat action tablets may be formed that periodically release a complete dose of the drug substance to the gastrointestinal fluids. Also, extended release tablets that continuously release increments of the contained drug substance to the gastrointestinal fluids may be formed.

Compounds of the invention can be also administered by controlled release means or by delivery devices that are well known to those of ordinary skill in the art. Examples include, but are not limited to, those described in U.S. Pat. Nos.: 3,845,770; 3,916,899; 3,536,809; 3,598,123; and 4,008,719, 5,674,533, 5,059,595, 5,591,767, 5,120,548, 5,073,543, 5,639,476, 5,354,556, and 5,733,566, each of which is incorporated herein by reference. Such dosage forms can be used to provide slow or controlled-release of one or more active ingredients using, for example, hydropropylmethyl cellulose, other polymer matrices, gels, permeable membranes, osmotic systems, multilayer coatings, microparticles, liposomes, microspheres, or a combination thereof to provide the desired release profile in varying proportions. Suitable controlled-release formulations known to those of ordinary skill in the art, including those described herein, can be readily selected for use with the compounds of this invention. The invention thus encompasses single unit dosage forms suitable for oral administration such as, but not limited to, tablets, capsules, gelcaps, and caplets that are adapted for controlled-release.

All controlled-release pharmaceutical products have a common goal of improving drug therapy over that achieved by their non-controlled counterparts. Ideally, the use of an optimally designed controlled-release preparation in medical treatment is characterized by a minimum of drug substance being employed to cure or control the condition in a minimum amount of time. Advantages of controlled-release formulations include extended activity of the drug, reduced dosage frequency, and increased patient compliance. In addition, controlled-release formulations can be used to affect the time of onset of action or other characteristics, such as blood levels of the drug, and can thus affect the occurrence of side (e.g., adverse) effects.

Most controlled-release formulations are designed to initially release an amount of drug (active ingredient) that promptly produces the desired therapeutic effect, and gradually and continually release other amounts of drug to maintain this level of therapeutic or prophylactic effect over an extended period of time. In order to maintain this constant level of drug in the body, the drug must be released from the dosage form at a rate that will replace the amount of drug being metabolized and excreted from the body. Controlled-release of an active ingredient can be stimulated by various conditions including, but not limited to, pH, temperature, enzymes, water, or other physiological conditions or compounds.

Compounds of the present invention may also be formulated as transdermal, topical, and mucosal dosage forms, which forms include, but are not limited to, ophthalmic solutions, sprays, aerosols, creams, lotions, ointments, gels, solutions, emulsions, suspensions, or other forms known to one of skill in the art. See, e.g., Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences, 16th and 18th eds., Mack Publishing, Easton Pa. (1980 & 1990); and Introduction to Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms, 4th ed., Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia (1985). Transdermal dosage forms include “reservoir type” or “matrix type” patches, which can be applied to the skin and worn for a specific period of time to permit the penetration of a desired amount of active ingredients.

Suitable excipients (e.g., carriers and diluents) and other materials that can be used to provide transdermal, topical, and mucosal dosage forms encompassed by this invention are well known to those skilled in the pharmaceutical arts, and depend on the particular tissue to which a given pharmaceutical composition or dosage form will be applied.

Depending on the specific tissue to be treated, additional components may be used prior to, in conjunction with, or subsequent to treatment with active ingredients of the invention. For example, penetration enhancers can be used to assist in delivering the active ingredients to the tissue.

The pH of a pharmaceutical composition or dosage form, or of the tissue to which the pharmaceutical composition or dosage form is applied, may also be adjusted to improve delivery of one or more active ingredients. Similarly, the polarity of a solvent carrier, its ionic strength, or tonicity can be adjusted to improve delivery. Compounds such as stearates can also be added to pharmaceutical formulations or dosage forms to advantageously alter the hydrophilicity or lipophilicity of one or more active ingredients so as to improve delivery. In this regard, stearates can serve as a lipid vehicle for the formulation, as an emulsifying agent or surfactant, and as a delivery-enhancing or penetration-enhancing agent. Different salts, hydrates or solvates of the active ingredients can be used to further adjust the properties of the resulting composition.

When the compounds of the present invention are administered as pharmaceuticals, to humans and animals, they can be given per se or as a pharmaceutical composition containing, for example, 0.1 to 99.5% of active ingredient in combination with a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.

The preparations of the present invention may be given orally and parenterally. They are of course given in forms suitable for each administration route. For example, they are administered in tablets or capsule form, by injection, and by intravenous administration. In one embodiment, oral administrations are preferred.

The phrases “parenteral administration” and “administered parenterally” as used herein means modes of administration other than enteral and topical administration, usually by injection, and includes, without limitation, intravenous, intramuscular, intraarterial, intrathecal, intracapsular, intraorbital, intracardiac, intradermal, intraperitoneal, transtracheal, subcutaneous, subcuticular, intraarticular, subcapsular, subarachnoid, intraspinal and intrasternal injection and infusion.

The selected dosage level will depend upon a variety of factors including the activity of the particular compound of the present invention employed, or the ester, salt or amide thereof, the route of administration, the time of administration, the rate of excretion or metabolism of the particular compound being employed, the duration of the treatment, other drugs, compounds and/or materials used in combination with the particular compound employed, the age, sex, weight, condition, general health and prior medical history of the patient being treated, and like factors well known in the medical arts.

A physician or veterinarian having ordinary skill in the art can readily determine and prescribe the effective amount of the pharmaceutical composition required. For example, the physician or veterinarian could start doses of the compounds of the invention employed in the pharmaceutical composition at levels lower than that required in order to achieve the desired therapeutic effect and gradually increase the dosage until the desired effect is achieved.

In general, a suitable daily dose of a compound of the invention will be that amount of the compound which is the lowest dose effective to produce a therapeutic effect. Such an effective dose will generally depend upon the factors described above. Generally, intravenous, intracerebroventricular and subcutaneous doses of the compounds of this invention for a patient will range from about 0.005 mg per kilogram to about 5 mg per kilogram of body weight per day.

The terms “treatment” or “treating” is intended to encompass therapy, preventing (prophylaxis), preventing relapse, and amelioration of acute symptoms. Note that “treating” refers to either or both of the amelioration of symptoms and the resolution of the underlying condition. In many of the conditions of the invention, the administration of a compound or composition of the invention may act not directly on the disease state, but rather on some pernicious symptom, and the improvement of that symptom leads to a general and desirable amelioration of the disease state

The patient receiving this treatment is any animal in need, including primates, in particular humans, and other mammals such as equines, cattle, swine and sheep; and poultry and pets in general.

The compounds and pharmaceutical formulations of the invention can be administered in conjunction with other pharmaceutical agents, for instance antimicrobial agents, such as penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides. Conjunctive therapy thus includes sequential, simultaneous and separate administration of the active compound in a way that the therapeutic effects of the first administered agent have not entirely disappeared when the subsequent agent is administered.

While the invention has been described in conjunction with the exemplary embodiments described above, many equivalent modifications and variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art when given this disclosure. Accordingly, the exemplary embodiments of the invention set forth are considered to be illustrative and not limiting. Various changes to the described embodiments may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Exemplary embodiments are summarized herein below.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a compound which has a structure according to the following formulae:


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy, or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


wherein R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy, or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


wherein R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a compound as described in any of the above paragraphs or


and (b) an additional therapeutic agent.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to the above paragraph, the additional therapeutic agent is a member selected from a beta-antagonist, a prostaglandin, an alpha2 adrenoreceptor agonist, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor and a miotic.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the additional therapeutic agent is a beta-antagonist, and the beta-antagonist is a member selected from Timoptic, Timoptic (XE/GFS, or Ocudose), Betoptic, Optipranolol and Ocupress.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the additional therapeutic agent is a prostaglandin, and the prostaglandin selected from Xalatan, Rescula, Travatan and Lumigan.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the additional therapeutic agent is a alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist, and the alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist is a member selected from Alphagan, Iopidine and Propine.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the additional therapeutic agent is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, and the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor is Trusopt or Azopt.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the additional therapeutic agent is a miotic, and the miotic is a member selected from physostigmine, carbacol and piolocarpine.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a boron-containing compound of any of the above paragraphs, and a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a method of inhibiting a kinase, comprising contacting said kinase with a boron-containing compound of any of the above paragraphs, thereby inhibiting said kinase.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to the above paragraph, the kinase includes a hinge region.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the kinase is a serine/threonine kinase.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the kinase is an ACG kinase.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the kinase is a Rho kinase.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the kinase is ROCK1 or ROCK2.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is a member selected from

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the kinase is a NAK kinase.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the kinase is AAK1.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


wherein R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


wherein R is halogen or unsubstituted alkoxy, or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


wherein R is unsubstituted C1 or C2 or C3 or C4 or C5 or C6 alkoxy. In an exemplary embodiment, R is methoxy.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound has a structure which is


or a salt thereof.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is a member selected from

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a method of treating and/or preventing a disease, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a boron-containing compound in any of the above paragraphs, thereby treating the disease.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to the above method paragraph, the disease implicates a kinase.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is caused by the overexpression, underexpression or malfunction of said kinase.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the compound is a member selected from

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is a member selected from glaucoma, cardiovascular disease, cancer, neuronal degeneration, kidney failure, asthma, osteoporosis, erectile dysfunction, insulin resistance, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), cerebral vasospasm, angina and restenosis.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is cardiovascular disease, and said cardiovascular disease is cardiac hypertrophy or cardiac fibrosis.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is glaucoma, and glaucoma is a member selected from a primary glaucoma, a developmental glaucoma, a secondary glaucoma and absolute glaucoma.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is glaucoma, and glaucoma is a member selected from primary open-angle glaucoma (chronic open-angle glaucoma, chronic simple glaucoma or glaucoma simplex), low-tension glaucoma or primary angle-closure glaucoma (primary closed-angle glaucoma, narrow-angle glaucoma, pupil-block glaucoma or acute congestive glaucoma).

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is glaucoma, and glaucoma is a member selected from acute angle-closure glaucoma or chronic angle-closure glaucoma or intermittent angle-closure glaucoma.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is developmental glaucoma, and said developmental glaucoma is a member selected from primary congential glaucoma or infantile glaucoma or hereditary glaucoma.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is secondary glaucoma, and said secondary glaucoma is a member selected from inflammatory glaucoma or phacogenic glaucoma or glaucoma secondary to intraocular hemorrhage or traumatic glaucoma or neovascular glaucoma or drug-induced glaucoma or toxic glaucoma.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is secondary glaucoma, and said drug-induced glaucoma is a member selected from corticosteroid induced glaucoma.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is glaucoma, and glaucoma is a member selected from pigmentary glaucoma or exfoliation glaucoma.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the disease is inflammatory glaucoma, and said inflammatory glaucoma is a member selected from uveitis or Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a method of reducing intra-ocular pressure, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a boron-containing compound according to any of the above paragraphs, thereby reducing said intra-ocular pressure.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a method of treating and/or preventing ocular nerve neuropathy, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a boron-containing compound according to any of the above paragraphs, thereby treating and/or preventing ocular nerve neuropathy.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a method of reducing blood pressure, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a boron-containing compound according to any of the above paragraphs, thereby reducing said blood pressure.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a method of reducing and/or preventing spasms in veins, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a boron-containing compound according to any of the above paragraphs, thereby reducing and/or preventing spasms in veins.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention is a method of reducing and/or preventing smooth muscle contraction, comprising administering to an animal in need of treatment a therapeutically effective amount of a boron-containing compound according to any of the above paragraphs, thereby reducing said smooth muscle contraction.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, the animal is a human.

In an exemplary embodiment, according to any of the above method paragraphs, there is a proviso that the animal is not otherwise in need of treatment with a compound of the invention.

The invention is further illustrated by the Examples that follow. The Examples are not intended to define or limit the scope of the invention.

EXAMPLES

Proton NMR are recorded on Varian AS 300 (300 MHz) or AS400 (400 MHz) spectrometer and chemical shifts are reported as δ (ppm) down field from tetramethylsilane. Mass spectra are determined on Micromass Quattro II or Waters MS consisting of an Alliance 2795 (LC) and Waters Micromass ZQ detector at 120° C. The mass spectrometer was equipped with an electrospray ion source (ES) operated in a positive or negative mode.

All solvents used were commercially available and were used without further purification. Reactions were typically run using anhydrous solvents under an inert atmosphere of nitrogen.

1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded at 400 MHz for proton and 100 MHz for carbon-13 on a Varian 300 MercuryPlus station with an Oxford AS400 Spectrometer equipped with a Varian 400 ATB PFG probe. All deuterated solvents contained typically 0.03% to 0.05% v/v tetramethylsilane, which was used as the reference signal (set at δ 0.00 for both 1H and 13C).

Compounds are named using ChemDraw7.0, or using their catalogue name if commercially available.

HPLC analyses were performed on a Water 600 Controller system with a Waters 717 Plus Autosampler and a Waters 2996 Photodiode Array Detector. The column used was an ACE C18, 5 μm, 4.6×150 mm. A linear gradient was applied, starting at 95% A (A: 0.1% H3PO4 in water) and ending at 90% B (B: MeCN) over 6 min and then maintained at 90% B until the 10 min mark. The column is then re-equilibrated over 3 min to 95:5 with a total run time of 20 min. The column temperature was at ambient temperature with the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The Diode Array Detector was scanned from 200-400 nm.

Thin layer chromatography (TLC) was performed on Alugram® (Silica gel 60 F254) from Mancherey-Nagel and UV was typically used to visualize the spots. Additional visualization methods were also employed in some cases. In these cases the TLC plate was developed with iodine (generated by adding approximately 1 g of I2 to 10 g silica gel and thoroughly mixing), vanillin (generated by dissolving about 1 g vanillin in 100 mL 10% H2SO4), ninhydrin (available commercially from Aldrich), or Magic Stain (generated by thoroughly mixing 25 g (NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O, 5 g (NH4)2Ce(IV)(NO3)6 in 450 mL water and 50 mL concentrated H2SO4) to visualize the compound. Flash chromatography was preformed using typically 40-63 μm (230-400 mesh) silica gel from Silicycle following analogous techniques to those disclosed in Still, W. C.; Kahn, M.; and Mitra, M. Journal of Organic Chemistry, 1978, 43, 2923-2925. Typical solvents used for flash chromatography or thin layer chromatography were mixtures of chloroform/methanol, dichloromethane/methanol, ethyl acetate/methanol and hexanes/ethyl acetate. Reverse phase column chromatography were performed on a Biotage® using a Biotage C18 cartridges and a water/methanol gradient (typically eluting from 5% MeOH/H2O to 90% MeOH/H2O).

Preparative chromatography was performed on either a Waters Prep LC 4000 System using a Waters 2487 Diode Array or on a Waters LC Module 1 plus. The column used was a Waters XTerra Prep C18, 5 μm, 30×100 mm or Phenomenex Luna C18, 5 μm, 21.6×250 mm or Phenomenex Gemini C18, 5 μm, 100×30 mm. Narrow gradients with acetonitrile/water, with the water containing either 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid or 0.1% acetic acid, were used to elute the compound at a flow rate of approximately 20 mL/min and a total run time between 20-30 min.

Example 1 (4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydrobenzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-6-yloxy)phenyl)methanaminium chloride (T)

To the solution of 4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydrobenzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-6-yloxy)benzonitrile (1 g, 3.98 mmol) in a mixed solvent of EtOH (100 mL) and THF (25 mL) under N2 was added Pd/C (10 wt. %, 0.169 g). The reaction mixture was hydrogenated with a H2 balloon at room temperature with stirring for 19 h. The mixture was filtered, rotary evaporated and purified by silica gel column eluted with MeOH containing 0.6% v. NH4OH (3 mL 28-30% NH4OH to 500 mL MeOH). The white solid obtained was dissolved in water (80 mL) and 6N HCl (2 mL) was added, filtered and the filtrate was freeze-dried to give the desired salt (4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydrobenzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-6-yloxy)phenyl)methanaminium chloride as white solid (0.663 g, 2.27 mmol, yield 57.1%). M.p.>230° C. 1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 300 MHz): δ 9.23 (br. s, 1H), 8.38 (br. s, 3H), 7.49 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 2H), 7.43 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 1H), 7.31 (d, J=2.4 Hz, 1H), 7.16 (dd, J=8.1 & 2.4 Hz, 1H), 7.02 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 2H), 4.97 (s, 2H) and 3.97 (q, J=5.4 Hz, 2H) ppm. Purity (HPLC): 91.1% at 220 nm and 86.1% at 254 nm. MS: m/z=256 (M+1, ESI+) and m/z=254 (M−1, ESI−).

(3-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydrobenzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-6-yloxy)phenyl)methanaminium chloride (U)

The title compound was synthesized by the same procedure as described above for the preparation of its para-analog. Yield 59.9%. M.p. 180-188° C. 1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 300 MHz): δ 9.23 (br. s, 1H), 8.38 (br. s, 3H), 7.44 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 2H), 7.40 (t, J=8.4 Hz, 1H), 7.35 (d, J=2.4 Hz, 1H), 7.22 (dm, J=8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.18-7.15 (m, 2H), 6.98 (ddd, J=8.1 & 2.4 & 0.9 Hz, 1H), 4.97 (s, 2H) and 3.99 (br. s, 2H) ppm. Purity (HPLC): 94.4% at 220 nm and 98.5% at 254 nm. MS: m/z=256 (M+1, ESI+) and m/z=254 (M−1, ESI−).

(4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydrobenzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)phenyl)methanaminium chloride (V)

The title compound was synthesized by the same procedure as described above for the preparation of its regional isomer. Yield 66.7%. M.p.>250° C. 1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 300 MHz): δ 9.18 (s, 1H), 8.43 (br. s, 3H), 7.74 (d, J=8.1 Hz, 2H), 7.52 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 2H), 7.08 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1H), 6.98-6.94 (m, 2H), 4.91 (s, 2H) and 3.99 (br. q, J=4.8 Hz, 2H) ppm. Purity (HPLC): 92.2% at 220 nm and 94.9% at 254 nm. MS: m/z=256 (M+1, ESI+) and m/z=255 (M−, ESI−).

(W)

Compound 3

To a solution of 3-fluoro-4-hydroxy-benzonitrile (5 g, 36 mmol) in DMF (anhydrous, 100 mL) was slowly added K2CO3 (5.54 g, 40.1 mmol). After stirring for 5 minutes, to the solution was added 2-bromo-4-fluoro-benzaldehyde (8.89 g, 43.8 mmol). The reaction was heated at 70° C. and monitored by T.L.C. After 4 hours, the heating was stopped and after cooling to the room temperature, 100 mL of EtOAc was added. With stirring, 1 M HCl (˜50 mL) was slowly added until the pH was 7. The organic layer was then washed with H2O (3×50 mL), dried over MgSO4 and filtered. The filtrate was evaporated under vacuum. The residue was purified over silica gel, eluting with 12.5% EtOAc/hexanes to afford 4-(3-bromo-4-formyl-phenoxy)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile (3) 7.1 g in 61% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CHLOROFORM-d) δ ppm 10.28 (s, 1 H), 7.96 (d, J=8.60 Hz, 1 H), 7.51-7.59 (m, 2 H), 7.21-7.29 (m, 3 H), 7.03 (dd, 1 H).

Compound 4

To a solution of 4-(3-bromo-4-formyl-phenoxy)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile (3) (7.1 g, 22.8 mmol) in 1,4-dioxane (anhydrous, 150 mL) were added bis(pinacolato) diboron (6.95 g, 27.3 mmol), [1,1′-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene]palladium(II) chloride (1.67 g, 2.28 mmol) and KOAc (6.7 g, 68.4 mmol). The mixture was stirred at room temperature with N2 bubbling for 15 minutes. Then the reaction was heated at 100° C. under N2 for 4 hours. The solution was cooled to the room temperature and filtered. The filtrate was evaporated under vacuum. The residue was purified over silica gel, eluting with 25% EtOAc/hexanes to afford 3-fluoro-4-[4-formyl-3-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxy]-benzonitrile (4) 8.22 g in 98% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CHLOROFORM-d) δ ppm 10.44 (s, 1 H), 7.96 (d, J=8.59 Hz, 1 H), 7.49 (dd, J=9.76, 1.95 Hz, 1 H), 7.41-7.45 (m, 2 H), 7.07-7.12 (m, 2 H), 1.35 (s, 12 H)

Compound 5

To a solution of 3-fluoro-4-[4-formyl-3-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxy]-benzonitrile (4) (8.23 g, 22.4 mmol) in MeOH (anhydrous, 150 mL) was added NaBH4 (2.56 g, 67.2 mmol) slowly. The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 2 hours, then 1 M HCl (50 mL) was slowly added. The reaction was stirred over night. The methanol was evaporated under vacuum. Much of white solid was formed during the evaporation. The solid was filtered, washed with water, and air-dried to afford 3-fluoro-4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-6-yloxy)-benzonitrile (5) 4.5 g in 75% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 9.24 (s, 1 H), 8.06 (dd, J=10.94, 1.95 Hz, 1 H), 7.67 (d, J=8.60 Hz, 1 H), 7.49 (d, J=8.21 Hz, 1 H), 7.36 (d, J=2.34 Hz, 1 H), 7.29 (dd, J=8.21, 2.34 Hz, 1 H), 7.13 (t, J=8.40 Hz, 1 H), 4.98 (s, 2 H). ESMS (m/z): 268 (M−H). HPLC: 95.27% (220 nm), 97.09% (254 nm), 97.20% (maxplot).

(W)

To a clear solution of 3-fluoro-4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-6-yloxy)-benzonitrile (5) (0.8 g, 2.98 mmol) in THF (anhydrous, 30 mL) was added lithium aluminum hydride (0.28 g, 7.43 mmol) slowly at 0° C. The solution was stirred for 1 hour, before quenching with 1 M HCl (30 mL). Water (100 mL) was added and the mixture was stirred for 1 hour. Then the mixture was filtered. The filtrate was evaporated under vacuum. The residue was purified with reverse phase chromatography (biotage, gradient MeOH/H2O from 10% to 100%) to afford (W) 400 mg (white solid) in 43% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 9.19 (s, 1 H), 8.31 (br. s., 3 H), 7.56 (dd, J=11.90, 1.76 Hz, 1 H), 7.43 (d, J=8.20 Hz, 1 H), 7.32 (d, J=8.59 Hz, 1 H), 7.14-7.24 (m, 3 H), 4.96 (s, 2 H), 4.03 (s, 2 H). ESMS (m/z): 274 (M+H)+. HPLC: 96.22% (220 nm), 94.51% (maxplot).

(X)

Compound 2

To a solution of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzaldehyde (30 g, 197 mmol) in DCM (anhydrous, 120 mL) was added pyridine (79 mL, 986 mmol) at room temperature. After the mixture was cooled to −10° C., the Tf2O (50 mL, 296 mmol) was slowly added to the reaction between −10° C. to 0° C. The addition took about 2.5 hours. After the addition, the stirring was kept for 30 minutes. The EtOAc (200 mL) was added. The organic layer was washed with 1 M HCl (3×80 mL), dried over MgSO4, filtered, and evaporated under vacuum. The residue was purified over silica gel, eluting with 5% EtOAc/hexanes to give trifluoro-methanesulfonic acid 2-formyl-5-methoxy-phenyl ester (2) 46 g in 82% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CHLOROFORM-d) δ ppm 10.13 (s, 1 H), 7.95 (d, J=8.99 Hz, 1 H), 7.03 (dd, J=8.60, 2.34 Hz, 1 H), 6.88 (d, J=2.34 Hz, 1 H), 3.93 (s, 3 H)

Compound 3

To a solution of trifluoro-methanesulfonic acid 2-formyl-5-methoxy-phenyl ester (2) (46 g, 160 mmol) in 1,4-dioxane (anhydrous, 360 mL) were added bis(pinacolato)diboron (82.3 g, 320 mmol), [1,1′-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene] palladium(II) chloride (23.7 g, 32 mmol) and KOAc (47.6 g, 480 mmol). The mixture was stirred at room temperature with N2 bubbling for 30 minutes. Then the reaction was heated at 100° C. for 3 hours. The solution was filtered, evaporated under vacuum. The residue was purified over silica gel, eluting with 20% EtOAc/hexanes to afford 4-methoxy-2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzaldehyde (3) 37.8 g in 90% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CHLOROFORM-d) δ ppm 10.34 (s, 1 H), 7.90 (d, J=8.60 Hz, 1 H), 7.26 (s, 1 H), 6.99 (d, J=8.60 Hz, 1 H), 3.86 (s, 3 H), 1.36 (s, 12 H)

Compound 4

To a clear solution of 4-methoxy-2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzaldehyde (3) (48 g, 180 mmol) in MeOH (anhydrous, 300 mL) was slowly added NaBH4 (6.96 g, 180 mmol). The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 2 hours. Then 1M HCl (100 mL) was slowly added. After stirring for overnight, the MeOH was evaporated under vacuum. The solid was filtered, washed with water and air-dried to afford 6-methoxy-3H-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-1-ol (4) 23 g in 77% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 9.11 (s, 1 H), 7.29 (d, J=8.21 Hz, 1 H), 7.23 (d, J=2.34 Hz, 1 H), 7.03 (dd, J=8.40, 2.54 Hz, 1 H), 4.90 (s, 2 H), 3.75 (s, 3 H).

Compound 5

To a clear solution of 6-methoxy-3H-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-1-ol (4) (600 mg, 3.66 mmol) in DCM (anhydrous, 60 mL) was slowly added BBr3 (1M/DCM, 8.05 mL, 8.05 mmol) at −10° C. The reaction was stirred for 3 hours, with monitoring by NMR. After all 4 had gone, 30 mL of cold water was added. Then 50 mL of EtOAc was added to extract all organic compounds. The organic layer was washed with cold brine, until the pH of aqueous layer changed to pH 7. The organic layer was dried over Na2SO4, filtered, evaporated under vacuum. The residue (˜85% HPLC purity) was used directly for the next step reaction without further purification. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 9.29 (s, 1 H), 9.04 (s, 1 H), 7.17 (d, J=8.21 Hz, 1 H), 7.07 (d, J=2.34 Hz, 1 H), 6.85 (dd, J=8.21, 2.34 Hz, 1 H), 4.85 (s, 2 H). ESMS (m/z): 149 (M−H). HPLC: 88.31% (220 nm), 85.02% (maxplot).

Compound 6

To a solution of 3H-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborole-1,6-diol (5) (300 mg, 2 mmol) in DMSO (30 mL) were added K2CO3 (828 mg, 6 mmol) and 3-chloro-4-fluoro-benzonitrile (933 mg, 6 mmol). The reaction was heated at 90° C. for 7 hours. After the cooling of reaction solution, EtOAc (50 mL) was added. The organic layer was washed with water (5×50 mL). The organic layer was evaporated under vacuum. The residue was purified by reverse phase chromatography to afford 3-chloro-4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-6-yloxy)-benzonitrile (6) 190 mg in 33.3% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 9.24 (s, 1 H), 8.22 (s, 1 H), 7.77 (d, J=7.81 Hz, 1 H), 7.50 (d, J=8.20 Hz, 1 H), 7.34 (s, 1 H), 7.28 (d, J=8.20 Hz, 1 H), 7.01 (d, J=8.59 Hz, 1 H), 4.99 (s, 2 H). ESMS (m/z): 284 (M−H). HPLC: 96.41% (220 nm), 96.0% (maxplot).

(X)

To a clear solution of 3-chloro-4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-6-yloxy)-benzonitrile (6) (136 mg, 0.48 mmol) in THF (anhydrous, 60 mL) was added lithium aluminum hydride (1M/ether, 1.19 mL, 1.19 mmol) at 0° C. The reaction was stirred for 2 hours. Then the reaction was quenched with 1M HCl (30 mL). MeOH (50 mL) was added and the solution was filtered. The filtrate was evaporated under vacuum. The residue was purified by reverse phase chromatography (biotage, gradient MeOH/H2O from 10% to 100%) to afford (X) 106 mg (white solid) in 68% yield. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 9.19 (s, 1 H), 8.18 (br, s, 3 H), 7.75 (s, 1 H), 7.44-7.39 (m, 2 H), 7.19-7.10 (m, 3 H), 4.98 (s, 2 H), 4.03 (q, J=5.50 Hz, 2 H). ESMS (m/z): 290 (M+H)+. HPLC: 95.9% (220 nm), 96.85% (maxplot).

Preparation of 6-(1-Hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-2-pyrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (Y)

6-(4-Bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-chloro-nicotinonitrile (3)

2,6-Dichloronicotinonitrile (7.42 g, 42.9 mmol), 2-bromo-5-hydroxybenzaldehyde (7.84 g, 39.0 mmol) and triethylamine (7.89 g, 11.0 mL, 78.0 mmol) in 1,2-dichloroethane (50 mL) in a sealed reaction vessel was heated to 70° C. for 18 h. The reaction was cooled to room temperature and concentrated to give a mixture of 6-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-chloro-nicotinonitrile (3) and 2-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-6-chloro-nicotinonitrile (4) in a ratio of 1.8:1, respectively (18 g). TLC of 3 gave Rf=0.4 and 4 gave Rf=0.35 when eluted with 25% EtOAc/hexanes and rendered with UV lamp. The mixture was fractionated by dry-pack column chromatography as follows: The oil was diluted with CH2Cl2 (200 mL) followed by the addition of silica gel (70 g, 230-400 mesh) and concentrated to dryness. This was loaded onto a silica column (70 g, 230-400 mesh) and eluted with gradient 5-40% EtOAc/hexanes. Three major fractions where collected; fraction 1 with 3:4 in ratio 1:1.5 (3.40 g), fraction 2 with 3:4 in ratio 1.8:1 (3.70 g) and fraction 3 with 3:4 in ratio 2.0:1 (2.10 g). Fraction 3, which was the most enriched fraction in desired compound 3, was carried forward without further purification.

Compound 3: 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ 10.34 (s, 1H), 7.99 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.73 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.69 (d, J=2.7 Hz, 1H), 7.30 (dd, J=8.9, 2.3 Hz, 1H), 7.02 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H).

Compound 4: 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ 10.34 (s, 1H), 7.97 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.75 (d, J=10.5 Hz, 1H), 7.73 (d, J=2.3 Hz, 1H), 7.34 (dd, J=9.0, 3.1 Hz, 1H), 7.17 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1H).

6-(4-Bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-pyrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (5)

A mixture of 6-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-chloro-nicotinonitrile (3): 2-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-6-chloro-nicotinonitrile (4) in a ratio of 2.0:1 (1.14 g, 3.39 mmol) and pyrrolidine (723 mg, 0.85 mL, 10.2 mmol) in 1,2-dichloroethane (30 mL) in a sealed reaction vessel was heated to 80° C. for 90 min. The reaction was cooled to room temperature and concentrated to give a mixture of 6-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (5) and 2-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-6-pyrrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (6) in a ratio of 2:1 (2.10 g). TLC of 6-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (5) gave Rf=0.6 and 2-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-6-pyrrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (6) gave Rf=0.4 when eluted with 25% EtOAc/hexanes and rendered with UV lamp or a solution of phosphomolybdic acid in ethanol. The mixture was fractionated by dry-pack column chromatography as follows: The oil was diluted with 10% MeOH/CH2Cl2 (100 mL) followed by the addition of silica gel (10 g, 230-400 mesh) and concentrated to dryness. This was loaded onto a silica column (30 g, 230-400 mesh) and eluted with 10% EtOAc/hexanes. The mixture was separable and gave 5 (550 mg, white solid, 43% yield) and 6 (120 mg, white solid, 10% yield).

Compound 5: 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ 10.34 (s, 1H), 7.79 (d, J=3.1 Hz, 1H), 7.69 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 7.65 (d, J=8.6 Hz. 1H), 7.28 (dd, J=9.0, 3.1 Hz, 1H), 6.18 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 3.60-3.52 (4H), 1.93-1.87 (4H).

Compound 6: 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ 10.35 (s, 1H), 7.88 (d, J=2.7 Hz, 1H), 7.66 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.60 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.33 (dd, J=8.2, 2.7 Hz, 1H), 6.05 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 3.40-3.20 (4H), 2.13-1.81 (4H).

6-[3-Formyl-4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxyl]-2-pyrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (7)

6-(4-Bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (5) (505 mg, 1.36 mmol), bispinacolatodiboron (689 mg, 2.71 mmol) and KOAc (333 mg, 3.39 mmol) in a mixture of DMF (5 mL) and 1,2-dimethoxyethane (15 mL) in a sealed reaction vessel was heated to 90° C. for 5 min. PdCl2(dppf) (99 mg, 0.13 mmol) was then added and the reaction mixture was stirred vigorously at 90° C. for 3 h. The reaction was cooled to room temperature and diluted with benzene (300 mL) and concentrated to give a black solid which contained product 7 (1.70 g) [Note: addition of benzene followed by evaporation allowed for the azeotropic removal of DMF]. TLC of 7 gave Rf=0.4 when eluted with 25% EtOAc/hexanes and rendered with UV lamp or a solution of phosphomolybdic acid in ethanol. The crude black solid was fractionated by dry-pack column chromatography as follows: The solid was dissolved with 10% MeOH/CH2Cl2 (200 mL) followed by the addition of silica gel (10 g, 230-400 mesh) and concentrated to dryness. This was loaded onto a silica column (30 g, 230-400 mesh) and eluted with 10% EtOAc/hexanes. Isolated 7 as a white solid (308 mg, 54%). 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ 10.62 (s, 1H), 7.93 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 7.82 (d, J=2.3 Hz, 1H), 7.68 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.38 (dd, J=8.2, 2.3 Hz, 1H), 6.17 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 3.60-3.51 (4H), 1.93-1.83 (4H), 1.41 (s, 12 H).

6-(1-Hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-2-pyrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (Y)

A solution of NaBH4 (35 mg, 0.93 mmol) in MeOH (5 mL) was added to a solution of 6-[3-formyl-4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxy]-2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-nicotinonitrile (7) (250 mg, 0.60 mmol) in CH2Cl2 (2.5 mL) at room temperature and the reaction was stirred for 5 minutes. Additional NaBH4 solid (100 mg, 2.64 mmol) was added in portions over 25 minutes and the reaction was stirred for another 60 minutes at room temperature. A solution of glacial acetic acid (0.2 mL) in distilled water (0.2 mL) was added and the reaction was stirred for 15 minutes at room temperature. The reaction mixture was concentrated to dryness and dried under high vacuum to give 450 mg of a white solid. The white solid was fractionated by dry-pack column chromatography as follows: The solid was dissolved in AcOH/MeOH/CH2Cl2 (1:1:100, 200 mL) followed by the addition of silica gel (10 g, 230-400 mesh) and concentrated to dryness. This was loaded onto a silica column (20 g, 230-400 mesh) and eluted with AcOH/MeOH/CH2Cl2 (1:1:100). Isolated (Y) as a white sticky solid (110 mg). This sticky solid was dissolved in 30% MeOH/CH2Cl2 (30 mL) followed by addition of distilled water (300 mL) and freeze dried to give a free-flowing white solid (Y) (90 mg, 47% yield). 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ 9.19 (s, 1H), 7.89 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.73 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 7.20 (br s, 1H), 7.13 (br d, J=7.8 Hz, 1H), 6.22 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 4.96 (s, 2H), 3.48-3.40 (4H), 1.86-1.77 (4H); Mass Spectrum (M+H)+=322; HPLC purity 96.73% (Maxplot), 97.50% (220 nm), 97.63% (254 nm).

Synthesis of 2-Cyclopentyloxy-6-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-nicotinonitrile: (Z)

6-Chloro-2-cyclopentyloxy-nicotinamide (2)

To a solution of cyclopentanol (1.42 mL, 15.70 mmol) in DMF (5 mL) at 0° C. was added sodium hydride (95% in mineral oil, 0.39 g, 15.70 mmol) in portions and stirred for 1 h at room temperature. This mixture was slowly added to a solution of 2,6-dichloro-nicotinamide (2.0 g, 10.47 mmol) in DMF (10 mL) at 0° C. The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight. DMF was removed under reduced pressure, and the resulting mixture was diluted with EtOAc (100 mL), washed with water (2×25 mL) and brine (2×25 mL) solution, dried over anhyd. Na2SO4, filtered, and concentrated to give yellow oil, which was purified by flash chromatography on silica gel using 10-25% EtOAc/hexanes as eluent to yield the title compound (1.94 g, 51%) as a transparent oil. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.44 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.65 (br. s., 1 H), 7.03 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 5.74 (br. s., 1 H), 5.70-5.57 (m, 1 H), 2.25-1.95 (m, 2 H), 1.90-1.66 (m, 6 H).

6-Chloro-2-cyclopentyloxy-nicotinonitrile (3)

To a solution of 6-chloro-2-cyclopentyloxy-nicotinamide (1.56 g, 6.48 mmol) and pyridine (3.14 mL, 38.88 mmol) in acetonitrile (30 mL), phosphorus oxychloride (1.77 mL, 19.44 mmol) was added over a period of 5 min. The reaction was stirred at 55° C. for 1 h. Acetonitrile was evaporated in vacuo and the resulting residue was then neutralized with 1N NaOH at 0° C. until pH reached to ˜7. The reaction mixture was extracted with EtOAc (100 mL). The organic layer was collected and the aqueous was further extracted with EtOAc (3×50 mL). All organics were combined washed with brine (2×25 mL), dried over anhyd. Na2SO4, filtered, and concentrated to give the title compound (1.63 g, 94%) as yellow oil, which was carried forward without further purification. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.26 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.26 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1 H), 5.49-5.42 (m, 1 H), 2.25-1.78 (m, 2 H), 1.80-1.64 (m, 4 H), 1.60 (t, J=6.8 Hz, 2 H).

6-(4-Bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-cyclopentyloxy-nicotinonitrile (4)

To a mixture of 6-chloro-2-cyclopentyloxy-nicotinonitrile (1.32 g, 5.92 mmol) and 2-bromo-5-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (1.43 g, 7.10 mmol) in DMF (10 mL) was added potassium carbonate (1.22 g, 8.88 mmol). The resulting mixture was heated at 69° C. overnight. DMF was removed under reduced pressure, the residue was diluted with EtOAc (100 mL), washed with water (30 mL) and brine (30 mL), dried over Na2SO4, filtered, and concentrated to give white solid, which was purified by flash chromatography on silica gel using 10-25% EtOAc/hexanes as eluent to yield the title compound (2.30 g, quantitative) as white solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 10.19 (s, 1 H), 8.24 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.88 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1 H), 7.70 (s, 1 H), 7.60-7.46 (m, 1 H), 6.79 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 4.95 (br. s., 1 H), 1.87-1.50 (m, 6 H), 1.52-1.30 (m, 2 H).

2-Cyclopentyloxy-6-[3-formyl-4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxy]-nicotinonitrile (5)

To a degassed solution of 6-(4-bromo-3-formyl-phenoxy)-2-cyclopentyloxy-nicotinonitrile (2.20 g, 5.68 mmol) in 1,4-dioxane (25 mL) was added bis(pinacolato)diboron (1.73 g, 6.81 mmol), potassium acetate (1.67 g, 17.04 mmol), and [1,1′-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene]palladium(II) chloride (0.20 g, 0.28 mmol). Degassed again, and the suspension was heated at 80° C. overnight. The mixture was passed through Celite® washed with EtOAc (100 mL), organic layer was washed with water (30 mL) and brine (30 mL) solution, dried over Na2SO4, filtered, and concentrated to give crude product, which was purified by flash chromatography on silica gel using 10-25% EtOAc/hexanes as eluent to yield the title compound (2.0 g, 83%) as white solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 10.38 (s, 1 H), 8.24 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.82 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.74 (s, 1 H), 7.56 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 6.78 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 4.96 (br. s., 1 H), 1.80-1.54 (m, 6 H), 1.50-1.40 (m, 2 H), 1.34 (s, 12 H).

2-Cyclopentyloxy-6-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-nicotinonitrile (Z)

To a solution of 2-cyclopentyloxy-6-[3-formyl-4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxy]-nicotinonitrile (2.0 g, 4.60 mmol) in methanol (15 mL) at 0° C. was added sodium borohydride (0.26 g, 6.90 mmol). After 1 h at rt, 2 M HCl was added to it at 0° C. until pH reached to 3˜4. The resulting mixture was stirred at 0° C. for 30 min and then sonicated to give white solid which was filtered and lyophilized to yield Z (0.85 g, 56%) as white solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 9.24 (s, 1 H), 8.20 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.77 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.27 (d, J=1.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.18 (dd, J=8.2, 1.9 Hz, 1 H), 6.69 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 4.97 (br. s., 3 H), 1.75-1.54 (m, 6 H), 1.52-1.33 (m, 2 H); MS (ES) m/z: 337 (M+1)+; HPLC purity 99.36% (Maxplot), 99.35% (220 nm); Elemental analysis for C18H17BN2O4.0.25 H2O: Calculated C=63.46%, H=5.18%, N=8.22%; Found C=63.34%, H=5.17%, N=8.34%.

Example 2

Methods of synthesizing the following compounds are provided in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/357,687 (U.S. Pat. Pub. No. 20060234981) and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/505,591 (U.S. Pat. Pub. No. 20070155699).

  • 6-Phenoxy-1,3-dihydro-1-hydroxy-2,1-benzoxaborole (C21);
  • 5-(2-Cyanophenoxy)-1,3-dihydro-1-hydroxy-2,1-benzoxaborole (C23);
  • 5-Phenoxy-1,3-dihydro-1-hydroxy-2,1-benzoxaborole (C24);
  • 6-aminobenzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-1(3H)-ol (C50);
  • 6-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydrobenzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)nicotinonitrile (C57);
  • 6-(5-chloro-1H-indol-1-yl)benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-1(3H)-ol (C75);
  • 6-(benzylamino)benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-1(3H)-ol (C77);
  • 6-(dibenzylamino)benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-1(3H)-ol (C78);
  • 6-(5-chloro-3-(phenylthio)-1H-indol-1-yl)benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-1(3H)-ol (C80);
  • 6-(4-chlorophenylthio)benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-1(3H)-ol (C88)
  • 4-(4-Cyanophenoxy)phenylboronic acid (C97)

(a) (4-cyanophenyl)(4-bromophenyl)ether.

Under nitrogen, the mixture of 4-fluorobenzonitrile (7.35 g, 60.68 mmol), 4-bromophenol (10 g, 57.8 mmol) and potassium carbonate (12 g, 1.5 eq) in DMF (100 mL) was stirred at 100° C. for 16 h and then filtered. After rotary evaporation, the residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate and washed with 1N NaOH solution to remove unreacted phenol. The organic solution was dried and passed through a short silica gel column to remove the color and minor phenol impurity. Evaporation of the solution gave (4-cyanophenyl)(4-bromophenyl)ether (13.82 g, yield 87.2%) as a white solid. 1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 7.83 (d, 2H), 7.63 (d, 2H), 7.13 (d, 2H) and 7.10 (d, 2H) ppm.

(b) 4-(4-cyanophenoxy)phenylboronic acid.

The procedure described in Example 2d was used for the synthesis of 4-(4-cyanophenoxy)phenylboronic acid using (4-cyanophenyl)(4-bromophenyl)ether as starting material. The title compound was obtained as a white solid. M.p. 194-198° C. MS: m/z=239 (M+), 240 (M+1) (ESI+) and m/z=238 (M−1) (ESI−). HPLC: 95.3% purity at 254 nm and 92.1% at 220 nm. 1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6+D2O): δ 7.83-7.76 (m, 4H), 7.07 (d, 2H) and 7.04 (d, 2H) ppm.

2-Cyclopentyloxy-4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-benzonitrile (D37)

To a solution of 2-hydroxy-4-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-benzonitrile (200 mg, 0.75 mmol) in THF (50 mL) and DMF (20 mL) was added NaH (47 mg, 95%, 1.87 mmol) portion-wise. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 5 minutes, followed by the slow addition of cyclopentyl iodide (0.26 mL, 2.25 mmol). The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 24 hours. After the reaction, all volatile components were evaporated under vacuum. The residue was purified using silica gel column chromatography, eluting with 25% EtOAc/hexane, afforded 36 mg of the title compound in 12.6% yield. 1H NMR 400 MHz (DMSO-d6) δ: 9.23 (s, 1H), 7.78 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1H) 7.69 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.17 (s, 1H), 7.10 (dd, J=2.0, 8.2 Hz, 1H), 6.90 (d, J=2.3 Hz, 1H), 6.56 (dd, J=1.9, 8.6 Hz, 1H), 4.96 (s, 2H), 4.95 (t, J=5.8 Hz, 1H), 1.95-1.55 (m, 8H); MS (ES) m/z: 336 (M+H)+; HPLC purity: 99.15% (220 nm), 99.62% (MaxPlot).

2-Ethoxy-6-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-nicotinonitrile (D107)

6-Chloro-2-ethoxy-nicotinamide (2)

Refer to synthesis of D46 for preparation of 2,6-dichloro-nicotinamide (1). Freshly prepared sodium ethoxide solution in ethanol (12.1 mL of 2.17 M, 26.2 mmol) was slowly added over 10 min to a solution of 1(5.01 g, 26.2 mmol) in dimethylformamide (30 mL) at 15° C. [Note: a water bath was used to maintain reaction temperature around 14-16° C.; sodium ethoxide was prepared from reaction of Na solid (1.50 g, 65.2 mmol) with anhydrous EtOH (30.0 mL)]. Upon completion of sodium ethoxide addition, the reaction was stirred for 40 min at 14-16° C. [Note: An aliquot (0.3 mL) of reaction was concentrated. A 1H NMR of aliquot recorded in d6-DMSO showed ˜98% conversion to desired 2]. The reaction was poured into water (500 mL) and extracted with EtOAc (3×400 mL). All organics were combined, dried over Na2SO4, filtered and concentrated to give the title compound as a light gray solid (5.20 g, 95% purity as established by 1H NMR). The title compound was carried forward without further purification. 1H NMR 400 MHz (d6-DMSO) δ8.16 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 7.76 (br s, 1H), 7.57 (br s, 1H), 7.17 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1H), 4.41 (q, J=7.0 Hz, 2H), 1.35 (t, J=7.0 Hz, 3H).

6-Chloro-2-ethoxy-nicotinonitrile (3)

Experimental procedure for synthesis of 6-chloro-2-ethoxy-nicotinonitrile (3) is the same as that described in synthesis of D46. The reaction of 6-chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-nicotinamide (2) (5.20 g, 25.9 mmol) with phosphorus oxychloride (7.2 mL, 78 mmol) and pyridine (12.6 mL, 156 mmol) in acetonitrile (120 mL) gave a crude black oil upon workup. The black oil was fractionated by dry-pack column chromatography as follows: the oil was diluted with CH2Cl2 (300 mL) followed by the addition of silica gel (40 g, 230-400 mesh) and concentrated to dryness. This was loaded onto a silica column (120 g, 230-400 mesh) and eluted with 5% EtOAc/hexanes. Pure fractions were combined and concentrated to give the title compound as a white solid (4.20 g, 87% isolated). TLC eluted with 25% EtOAc/hexanes and rendered with UV lamp gave Rf=0.8; 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ7.80 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1H), 6.99 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 4.51 (q, J=7.0 Hz, 2H), 1.45 (t, J=7.0 Hz, 3H).

6-(4′-Bromo-3′-formyl-phenoxy)-2-ethoxy-nicotinonitrile (5)

Experimental procedure for synthesis of 6-(4′-bromo-3′-formyl-phenoxy)-2-ethoxy-nicotinonitrile (5) is the same as that described in synthesis of D46 except that the reaction was heated at 80° C. for 3.5 h. The reaction of 6-chloro-2-ethoxy-nicotinonitrile (3) (3.52 g, 19.3 mmol), 2-bromo-5-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (4) (2.58 g, 12.9 mmol) and K2CO3 (3.55 g, 25.7 mmol) in DMF (40 mL) gave crude oil upon workup. The oil was fractionated by dry-pack column chromatography as follows: the oil was diluted with CH2Cl2 (500 mL) followed by the addition of silica gel (80 g, 230-400 mesh) and concentrated to dryness. This was loaded onto a silica column (120 g, 230-400 mesh) and eluted with gradient 10-30% EtOAc/hexanes. Pure fractions were combined and concentrated to give the title compound as a white solid (3.71 g, 61% isolated yield). TLC eluted twice with 25% EtOAc/hexanes and rendered with UV lamp gave Rf=0.5; 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ 10.35 (s, 1H), 7.87 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.76 (d, J=3.1 Hz, 1H), 7.70 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.29 (dd, J=8.6, 3.1 Hz), 6.57 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 4.17 (q, J=7.0 Hz, 2H), 1.29 (t, J=7.0 Hz, 3H).

2-Ethoxy-6-[3-formyl-4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxy]-nicotinonitrile (6)

Experimental procedure for synthesis of 2-ethoxy-6-[3-formyl-4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxy]-nicotinonitrile (6) is the same as that described in synthesis of D46. The reaction of 6 (3.62 g, 10.5 mmol), bis(pinacolato)diboron (7.97 g, 31.4 mmol) and potassium acetate (3.08 g, 31.4 mmol) in a solvent mixture of dimethyl formamide (20 mL) and 1,2-dimethoxyethane (80 mL) gave a brown oil upon workup. The oil was fractionated by dry-pack column chromatography as follows: the oil was diluted with CH2Cl2 (400 mL) followed by the addition of silica gel (80 g, 230-400 mesh) and concentrated to dryness. This was loaded onto a silica column (80 g, 230-400 mesh) and eluted with gradient 10-20% EtOAc/hexanes. The pure fractions were combined and concentrated to give the title compound as a white solid (2.71 g, 74% isolated yield). TLC eluted with 25% EtOAc/hexanes and rendered with UV lamp gave Rf=0.4; 1H NMR 400 MHz (CDCl3) δ 10.64 (s, 1H), 7.97 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 7.86 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.79 (d, J=2.0 Hz, 1H), 7.38 (dd, J=8.2, 2.3 Hz, 1H), 6.54 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 4.17 (q, J=7.0 Hz, 2H), 1.41 (s, 12H), 1.28 (t, J=7.0 Hz, 3H).

2-Ethoxy-6-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-nicotinonitrile (D107)

Experimental procedure for synthesis of 6-(1-hydroxy-1,3-dihydro-benzo[c][1,2]oxaborol-5-yloxy)-2-morpholin-4-yl-nicotinonitrile (D107) is the same as that described in synthesis of (D46). The reaction of 2-ethoxy-6-[3-formyl-4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-phenoxy]-nicotinonitrile (6) (2.71 g, 7.81 mmol) with NaBH4 (886 mg, 23.4 mmol) gave an orange oil containing D107 upon workup. The oil was fractionated by dry-pack column chromatography as follows: the oil was diluted with 30% MeOH/CH2Cl2 (400 mL) followed by the addition of silica gel (80 g, 230-400 mesh) and concentrated to dryness. This was loaded onto a silica column (160 g, 230-400 mesh) and eluted with 1:1:100 acetic acid:MeOH:CH2Cl2. The fractions containing D107 were collected and concentrated to give a light yellow colored oil. The oil was freeze dried by first diluting with methanol (30 mL) followed by the addition of deionized water (400 mL), the resultant white suspension was frozen in a dry-ice acetone bath and placed overnight on freeze-dryer. A white solid of D107 was obtained (1.82 g, with 30 mol % pinacoldiol present as established by H NMR). To increase purity of D107, it was resubjected to column chromatography and freeze-dried following the same conditions as before to give D107 (402 mg, 17% isolated yield) as a white solid. 1H NMR 400 MHz (d6-DMSO) δ9.25 (s, 1H), 8.24 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 7.79 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.29 (d, J=2.0 Hz, 1H), 7.20 (dd, J=7.8, 2.0 Hz, 1H), 6.69 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 4.99 (s, 2H), 4.17 (q, J=7.0 Hz, 2H), 1.21 (t, J=7.0 Hz, 3H); Mass Spectrum [M+H+]=297; HPLC purity 97.18% (Maxplot), 97.65% (220 nm).

Example 2 In Vitro Assays

The ability of the compounds described herein to inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokines or phosphodiesterases were tested.

Cytokine Assay

Frozen human peripheral blood mononucleocytes (PBMC) were thawed and centrifuged. Cryopreservation media was aspirated off of the cell pellet, and the cells were resuspended in fresh culture media (CM) comprising RPMI 1640 and 10% FBS in 96 well plates. Test article was dissolved in DMSO to form a 10 mM sample (DMSO, 100%). The 10 mM samples were diluted to 100 μM in CM (DMSO, 1%), then further diluted to 10, 1, 0.1, 0.01 μM in 200 μL of CM (n=3). Inducer (1 μg/mL LPS for TNF-α and IL-1β [and IL-6] or 20 ug/mL PHA for IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10. IL-23 was induced with 100 ng/ml IFN-g+1 mg/ml LPS, using THP-1 cells. Vehicle (1% DMSO) was used as a control for this experiment. Vehicle without inducer was used as a negative control. Cells were incubated at 37° C., 5% CO2. Supernatants were extracted at 24 hours (for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IFNγ) and 48 hours (for IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-23), and stored at −20° C. Supernatants were thawed and assayed for cytokine expression using the fluorochrome-labeled cytokine-specific beads and a BD FACSArray™. IL-23 was assayed using a commercial ELISA kit (R&D Systems).

TNF-α: (T): 0.88 μm; (U): 0.93 μm; (W): 0.019 μm

INF-γ: (T): 25 μm; (U): 7 μm

IL-5: (T): 2.5 μm; (U): 16 μm

IL-23: (U): 3.1 μm

PDE Isoform Profiling

Recombinant human PDE enzymes were expressed in a baculoviral system. The assay is a modification of the 2-step method of Thompson & Appleman (Biochem. 10:311-316, 1971), which was adapted for 96-well plate format. Stock solutions were prepared at 40 mM in 100% DMSO. Final [DMSO] was 5%. Each compound was tested by performing 1 in 4 serial dilutions at starting concentration of 100 mM. Each concentration was tested in duplicate. IC50s were generated from 11-point curves and analyzed using Prism software (GraphPad Inc.). PDE isoforms tested include PDE1A3 (cAMP), PDE1A3 (cGMP), PDE2A3, PDE3Cat, PDE4Cat, PDE4A4, PDE4B2, PDE4C2, PDE4D3, PDE5Cat, PDE6AB, PDE7A1, PDE8A1, PDE9A1, PDE10A1 (cAMP), PDE10A1 (cGMP), PDE11A1 (cAMP) and PDE11A1 (cGMP).

PDE4 Assay

PDE4 partially purified from human U-937 myeloid leukemia cells was used. Test article and/or vehicle was incubated with 0.2 mg enzyme and 1 mM cAMP containing 0.01 mM [3H]cAMP in Tris buffer pH 7.5 for 20 minutes at 25° C. The reaction was terminated by boiling for 2 minutes and the resulting AMP is converted to adenosine by addition of 10 mg/ml snake venom nucleotidase and further incubation at 37° C. for 10 minutes. Unhydrolyzed cAMP is bound to AG1-X2 resin, and remaining [3H]Adenosine in the aqueous phase is quantitated by scintillation counting. Test articles were tested at 10, 3, 1, 0.3, 0.1, 0.03, 0.01, 0.003, and 0.001 μM for IC50 determination.

Kinase Assay (Such as ROCK1 or ROCK2)

The kinase assays were performed at room temperature using 20 nM ROCK1 or ROCK2 enzyme and 20 uM peptide substrate, [gamma-33P]ATP, and drug concentration were varied. The ROCK1 enzyme is recombinant human protein, Catalytic Domain (amino acids 1-535) (Reaction Biology Corp., Malvern, Pa.), GST-tagged, expressed in insect cells. MW=893.7 kDa. The ROCK2 enzyme is recombinant human protein (amino acids 11-552), N-terminal histidine-tagged, expressed in insect cells, MW=63.3 kDa (Reaction Biology Corp., Malvern, Pa.). The substrate was a peptide derived from S6 kinase peptide for both ROCK1 & 2 assays; [KEAKEKRQEQIAKRRRLSSLRASTSKSGGSQK], Mw=3630 Da (Reaction Biology Corp., Malvern, Pa.). The reaction buffer contained 20 mM HEPES-HCl, pH 7.5, 10 mM MgCl2, 1 mM EGTA, 0.02% Brij35, 0.1 mM Na3VO4, 0.02 mg/ml BSA, 2 mM DTT, and 1% DMSO. Enzyme/substrate/drug mixture were added and incubated for 20 min to ensure compound was equilibrated and bound to the enzyme. Then concentrations of ATP were added to initiate the reaction. The activity was monitored by filter plate capture of the radioactive peptide using ion exchange filtration (P81, Whatmann) and washed extensively. The reactions were monitored every 5-15 min to obtain progress curve with time course. At each time point, radioisotope signal (“P) was converted into “uM phosphate transferred to substrate”, and was plotted against time. The initial linear slope of progress curve was obtained by linear regression. The slopes (or velocity; uM/min) were then plotted against ATP concentrations for Michaelis-Menten plot, and subsequent Lineweaver-Burk plot (double-reciprocal plot) and secondary plot, using GraphPad Prism software.

IC50 (μM):

ROCK1: (T): 8.1; (U): 69.5; (V): 25.1; (W): 2.44; (X): 4.75; (Z): 18.15

ROCK2: (T): 3.1; (U): 40.2; (V): 10.1; (W): 0.86; (X): 2.11; (Z): 9.09

Example 3 In Vivo Assays

1. In Vivo Anti-Inflammation Activity in Phorbol Ester Induced Mouse Ear Edema Model

Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 5 μg in 20 μL of acetone) can be applied topically to the anterior and posterior surfaces of the right ear to eight groups of CD-1 (Crl.) derived male mice of 5 each (weighing 22±2 g). Test substances and vehicle (acetone:ethanol/1:1, 20 μL/ear) can be each applied to both ears topically 30 minutes before and 15 minutes after PMA challenge. Dexamethasone (1 mg/ear×2) can be used as the positive control and can be administered topically to test animals using the same application schedule. Ear swelling can be then measured by a Dyer model micrometer gauge at 6 hours after PMA application as an index of inflammation. Percent inhibition can be calculated according to the formula: [(Ic−It)/Ic]×100%, where Ic and It refer to increase of ear thickness (mm) in control and treated mice, respectively. Percent inhibition of 30 percent or more in ear swelling can be considered significant anti-inflammatory activity.

2. In Vivo Anti-Inflammation Activity in Oxazolone Induced Mouse Ear Edema Model

Groups of 5 BALB/c male mice weighing 23±2 g can be used. The preshaved abdomens of test animals can be sensitized by application of 100 μL of 1.5% oxazolone solution dissolved in acetone. Seven days after the initial sensitization, test substances, as well as vehicle (acetone:ethanol/1:1, 20 μL/ear) can be each administered topically to the anterior and posterior surfaces of the right ear 30 minutes before, and 15 minutes after, challenge by a second application of oxazolone (1% in acetone, 20 ml/ear) via topical route. As a positive control, indomethacin (0.3 mg/ear'2) can be administered topically using the same treatment regime as for the test compounds. Twenty-four hours after the second application of oxazolone, the ear thickness of each mouse can be measured with a Dyer model micrometer gauge. A 30 percent or more inhibition in ear swelling relative to the vehicle control can be considered significant and indicated possible anti-inflammatory activity.

Example 4

As stated hereinbefore the compounds of the invention possess biological activity against a variety of receptors and downstream targets of those receptors. These properties may be assessed, for example, using one or more of the procedures set out below:

EGFR Testing

(a) An In Vitro Assay which Determines the Ability of a Test Compound to Inhibit EGFR Kinase.

The ability of compounds to inhibit receptor kinase (EGFR) activity can be assayed using HTScan™ EGF Receptor Kinase Assay Kits (Cell Signaling Technologies, Danvers, Mass.). EGFR tyrosine kinase can be obtained as GST-kinase fusion protein which can be produced using a baculovirus expression system with a construct expressing human EGFR (His672-Ala1210) (GenBank Accession No. NM-005228) with an amino-terminal GST tag. The protein can be purified by one-step affinity chromatography using glutathione-agarose. An anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody, P-Tyr-100, can be used to detect phosphorylation of biotinylated substrate peptides (EGFR, Biotin-PTP1B (Tyr66). Enzymatic activity can be tested in 60 mM HEPES, 5 mM MgCl2 5 mM MnCl2 200 μM ATP, 1.25 mM DTT, 3 μM Na3VO4, 1.5 mM peptide, and 50 ng EGF Recpetor Kinase. Bound antibody can be detected using the DELFIA system (PerkinElmer, Wellesley, Mass.) consisting of DELFIA™. Europium-labeled Anti-mouse IgG (PerkinElmer, #AD0124), DELFIA™. Enhancement Solution (PerkinElmer, #1244-105), and a DELFIA™. Streptavidin coated, 96-well Plate (PerkinElmer, AAAND-0005). Fluorescence can be measured on a WALLAC Victor 2 plate reader and reported as relative fluorescence units (RFU). Data can be plotted using GraphPad Prism (v4.0a) and IC50s calculated using a sigmoidal dose response curve fitting algorithm.

Test compounds can be dissolved in dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) to give a 20 mM working stock concentration. Each assay can be setup as follows: Added 100 μl of 10 mM ATP to 1.25 ml 6 mM substrate peptide. Diluted the mixture with dH2O to 2.5 ml to make 2×ATP/substrate cocktail ([ATP]=400 mM, [substrate]=3 mM). Immediately transfer enzyme from −80° C. to ice. Allowed enzyme to thaw on ice. Microcentrifuged briefly at 4° C. to bring liquid to the bottom of the vial. Returned immediately to ice. Added 10 μl of DTT (1.25 mM) to 2.5 ml of 4×HTScan™ Tyrosine Kinase Buffer (240 mM HEPES pH 7.5, 20 mM MgCl2, 20 mM MnCl, 12 mM NaVO3) to make DTT/Kinase buffer. Transfer 1.25 ml of DTT/Kinase buffer to enzyme tube to make 4× reaction cocktail ([enzyme]=4 ng/μL in 4× reaction cocktail). Incubated 12.5 μl of the 4× reaction cocktail with 12.5 μl/well of prediluted compound of interest (usually around 10 μM) for 5 minutes at room temperature. Added 25 μl of 2×ATP/substrate cocktail to 25 μl/well preincubated reaction cocktail/compound. Incubated reaction plate at room temperature for 30 minutes. Added 50 μl/well Stop Buffer (50 mM EDTA, pH 8) to stop the reaction. Transferred 25 μl of each reaction and 75 μl dH2O/well to a 96-well streptavidin-coated plate and incubated at room temperature for 60 minutes. Washed three times with 200 μl/well PBS/T (PBS, 0.05% Tween-20). Diluted primary antibody, Phospho-Tyrosine mAb (P-Tyr-100), 1:1000 in PBS/T with 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA). Added 100 μl/well primary antibody. Incubated at room temperature for 60 minutes. Washed three times with 200 μl/well PBS/T. Diluted Europium labeled anti-mouse IgG 1:500 in PBS/T with 1% BSA. Added 100 μl/well diluted antibody. Incubated at room temperature for 30 minutes. Washed five times with 200 μl/well PBS/T. Added 100 μl/well DELFIA™. Enhancement Solution. Incubated at room temperature for 5 minutes. Detected 615 nm fluorescence emission with appropriate Time-Resolved Plate Reader.

(b) An In Vitro Assay which Determines the Ability of a Test Compound to Inhibit the EGF-Stimulated EGFR Phosphorylation.

Allowed A431 cell growth in a T75 flask using standard tissue culture procedures until cells reach near confluency (about 1.5×107) cells; D-MEM, 10% FBS). Under sterile conditions dispensed 100 μl of the cell suspension per well in 96-well microplates (x cells plated per well). Incubated cells and monitor cell density until confluency is achieved with well-to-well consistency; approximately three days. Removed complete media from plate wells by aspiration or manual displacement. Replaced media with 50 μl of pre-warmed serum free media per well and incubated 4 to 16 hours. Made two fold serial dilutions of inhibitor using pre-warmed D-MEM so that the final concentration of inhibitor range from 10 μM to 90 μM. Removed media from A431 cell plate. Added 100 μl of serial diluted inhibitor into cells and incubate 1 to 2 hours. Removed inhibitor from plate wells by aspiration or manual displacement. Added either serum free media for resting cells (mock) or serum free media with 100 ng/ml EGF. Used 100 μl of resting/activation media per well. Allowed incubation at 37° C. for 7.5 minutes. Removed activation or stimulation media manually or by aspiration. Immediately fixed cells with 4% formaldehyde in 1×PBS. Allowed incubation on bench top for 20 minutes at RT with no shaking Washed five times with 1×PBS containing 0.1% Triton X-100 for 5 minutes per Wash. Removed Fixing Solution. Using a multi-channel pipettor, added 200 μl of Triton Washing Solution (1×PBS+0.1% Triton X-100). Allowed wash to shake on a rotator for 5 minutes at room temperature. Repeated washing steps 4 more times after removing wash manually. Using a multi-channel pipettor, blocked cells/wells by adding 100 μl of LI-COR Odyssey Blocking Buffer to each well. Allowed blocking for 90 minutes at RT with moderate shaking on a rotator. Added the two primary antibodies into a tube containing Odyssey Blocking Buffer. Mixed the primary antibody solution well before addition to wells (Phospho-EGFR Tyr1045, (Rabbit; 1:100 dilution; Cell Signaling Technology, 2237; Total EGFR, Mouse; 1:500 dilution; Biosource International, AHR5062). Removed blocking buffer from the blocking step and added 40 μl of the desired primary antibody or antibodies in Odyssey Blocking Buffer to cover the bottom of each well. Added 100 μl of Odyssey Blocking Buffer only to control wells. Incubated with primary antibody overnight with gentle shaking at RT. Washed the plate five times with 1×PBS+0.1% Tween-20 for 5 minutes at RT with gentle shaking, using a generous amount of buffer. Using a multi-channel pipettor added 200 μl of Tween Washing Solution. Allowed wash to shake on a rotator for 5 minutes at RT. Repeated washing steps 4 more times. Diluted the fluorescently labeled secondary antibody in Odyssey Blocking Buffer (Goat anti-mouse IRDye™ 680 (1:200 dilution; LI-COR Cat.#926-32220) Goat anti-rabbit IRDye™ 800CW (1:800 dilution; LI-COR Cat.#926-32211). Mixed the antibody solutions well and added 40 μl of the secondary antibody solution to each well. Incubated for 60 minutes with gentle shaking at RT. Protected plate from light during incubation. Washed the plate five times with 1×PBS+0.1% Tween-20 for 5 minutes at RT with gentle shaking, using a generous amount of buffer. Using a multi-channel pipettor added 200 μl of Tween Washing Solution. Allowed wash to shake on a rotator for 5 minutes at RT. Repeated washing steps 4 more times. After final wash, removed wash solution completely from wells. Turned the plate upside down and tap or blot gently on paper towels to remove traces of wash buffer. Scanned the plate with detection in both the 700 and 800 channels using the Odyssey Infrared Imaging System (700 nm detection for IRDye™ 680 antibody and 800 nm detection for IRDye™ 800CW antibody). Determined the ratio of total to phosphorylated protein (700/800) using Odyssey software and plot the results in Graphpad Prism (V4.0a). Data can be plotted using GraphPad Prism (v4.0a) and IC50s calculated using a sigmoidal dose response curve fitting algorithm.

(c) An In Vitro Assay which Determines the Ability of a Test Compound to Inhibit HDAC Enzymatic Activity.

HDAC inhibitors can be screened using an HDAC fluorimetric assay kit (AK-500, Biomol, Plymouth Meeting, Pa.). Test compounds can be dissolved in dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) to give a 20 mM working stock concentration. Fluorescence can be measured on a WALLAC Victor 2 plate reader and reported as relative fluorescence units (RFU). Data can be plotted using GraphPad Prism (v4.0a) and IC50s calculated using a sigmoidal dose response curve fitting algorithm.

Each assay can be setup as follows: Defrosted all kit components and kept on ice until use. Diluted HeLa nuclear extract 1:29 in Assay Buffer (50 mM Tris/C1, pH 8.0, 137 mM NaCl, 2.7 mM KCl, 1 mM MgCl2). Prepared dilutions of Trichostatin A (TSA, positive control) and tested compounds in assay buffer (5× of final concentration). Diluted Fluor de Lys™. Substrate in assay buffer to 100 uM (50 fold=2× final). Diluted Fluor de Lys™ developer concentrate 20-fold (e.g. 50 μl plus 950 μl Assay Buffer) in cold assay buffer. Second, diluted the 0.2 mM Trichostatin A 100-fold in the 1× Developer (e.g. 10 μl in 1 ml; final Trichostatin A concentration in the 1× Developer=2 μM; final concentration after addition to HDAC/Substrate reaction=1 μM). Added Assay buffer, diluted trichostatin A or test inhibitor to appropriate wells of the microtiter plate. Added diluted HeLa extract or other HDAC sample to all wells except for negative controls. Allowed diluted Fluor de Lys™ Substrate and the samples in the microtiter plate to equilibrate to assay temperature (e.g. 25 or 37° C.). Initiated HDAC reactions by adding diluted substrate (25 μl) to each well and mixing thoroughly. Allowed HDAC reactions to proceed for 1 hour and then stopped them by addition of Fluor de Lys™ Developer (50 μl). Incubated plate at room temperature (25° C.) for 10-15 min. Read samples in a microtiter-plate reading fluorimeter capable of excitation at a wavelength in the range 350-380 nm and detection of emitted light in the range 440-460 nm.

HM74A

The ability of compounds to activate HM74A may be demonstrated, for example, using the following in vitro and in vivo assays:

In-Vitro Testing

For transient transfections, HEK293T cells (HEK293 cells stably expressing the SV40 large T-antigen) are maintained in DMEM containing 10% foetal calf serum and 2 mM glutamine. Cells are seeded in 90 mm culture dishes and grown to 60-80% confluence (18-24 h) prior to transfection. Human HM74A (GenBank™ accession number AY148884) is subcloned in to a mammalian expression vector (pcDNA3; Invitrogen) and transfected using Lipofectamine reagent. For transfection, 9 μg of DNA is mixed with 30 μl Lipofectamine in 0.6 ml of Opti-MEM (Life Technologies Inc.) and incubated at room temperature for 30 min prior to the addition of 1.6 ml of Opti-MEM. Cells are exposed to the Lipofectamine/DNA mixture for 5 h and 6 ml of 20% (v/v) foetal calf serum in DMEM is then added. Cells are harvested 48 h after transfection. Pertussis toxin treatment is carried out by supplementation into media at 50 ngml−1 for 16 h. All transient transfection studies involve co-transfection of receptor together with the Gi/oG protein, Go1alpha.

For generation of stable cell lines the above method is used to transfect CHO-K1 cells seeded in six well dishes grown to 30% confluence. These cells are maintained in DMEM F-12 HAM media containing 10% foetal calf serum and 2 mM glutamine. 48 h post-transfection the media is supplemented with 400 μg/ml Geneticin (G418, Gibco) for selection of antibiotic resistant cells. Clonal CHO-K1 cell lines stably expressing HM74A are confirmed by [35S]-GTPγS binding measurements, following the addition of nicotinic acid.

P2 membrane preparation—Plasma membrane-containing P2 particulate fractions are prepared from cell pastes frozen at −80° C. after harvest. All procedures are carried out at 4° C. Cell pellets are resuspended in 1 ml of 10 mM Tris-HCl and 0.1 mM EDTA, pH 7.5 (buffer A) and by homogenization for 20s with a Ultra Turrax followed by passage (5 times) through a 25-gauge needle. Cell lysates are centrifuged at 1,000 g for 10 min in a microcentrifuge to pellet the nuclei and unbroken cells and P2 particulate fractions are recovered by microcentrifugation at 16,000 g for 30 min. P2 particulate fractions are resuspended in buffer A and stored at −80° C. until required.

[35S]-GTPγS binding—Assays are performed at room temperature either in 96-well format as described previously (Wieland, T. and Jakobs, K. H. (1994) Methods Enzymol. 237, 3-13) or in an adapted protocol carried out in 384-well format.

96-well format: Briefly, membranes (10 μg per point) are diluted to 0.083 mg/ml in assay buffer (20 mM HEPES, 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM MgCl2, pH 7.4) supplemented with saponin (10 mg/l) and pre-incubated with 10 μM GDP. Various concentrations of nicotinic acid or related molecules are added, followed by [35S]-GTPγS (1170 Ci/mmol, Amersham) at 0.3 nM (total vol. of 100 μl) and binding is allowed to proceed at room temperature for 30 min. Non-specific binding is determined by the inclusion of 0.6 mM GTP. Wheatgerm agglutinin SPA beads (Amersham) (0.5 mg) in 25 μl assay buffer are added and the whole is incubated at room temperature for 30 min with agitation. Plates are centrifuged at 1500 g for 5 min and bound [35S]-GTPγS is determined by scintillation counting on a Wallac 1450 microbeta Trilux scintillation counter.

384-well format: Briefly, the dilution of standard or test compounds are prepared and added to a 384-well plate in a volume of 10 μl. Membranes (HM74A or HM74) are diluted in assay buffer (20 mM HEPES, 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM MgCl2, pH7.4) supplemented with saponin (60 μg/ml), Leadseeker WGA beads (Amersham; 250 μg/well) and 10 μM GDP, so that the 20 μl volume added to each well contains 5 μg of membranes. [35S]-GTPγS (1170 Ci/mmol, Amersham) is diluted (1:1500) in assay buffer and 20 μl added to each well. Following the addition of the radioligand, the plates are sealed, pulse spun and incubated for 4 hours at room temperature. At the end of the incubation period the plates are read on a Leadseeker machine (VIEWLUX PLUS; Perkin-Elmer) to determine the levels of specific binding.

In-Vivo Testing

HM74A agonists are tested in male Spague-Dawley rats (200-250 grams) which have been fasted for at least 12 hours prior to the study. The compounds are dosed intravenously (5 ml/kg) or by oral gavage (10 ml/kg). Blood samples (0.3 ml tail vein bleed) are taken pre-dose and at three times post-dose (times ranging from 15 minutes to 8 hours post-dose). Each blood sample is transferred to a heparin tube (Becton Dickinson Microtainer, PST LH) and centrifuged (10,000 g for 5 minutes) to produce a plasma sample. The plasma samples are assayed for levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) using a commercially available kit (Randox). Inhibition of plasma NEFA levels, relative to pre-dose levels, is used as a surrogate for HM74A agonist activity.

In order to determine whether compounds of the invention exhibit the flushing response associated with nicotinic acid, they are dosed to anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Nicotinic acid is used as positive control. Male Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs (300-800 g) are fasted for 12 hours prior to being anaesthetized with a mixture of Ketamine hydrochloride (Vetalar, 40 mg/kg i.m.), Xylazine (Rompun, 8 mg/kg i.m.) and sodium pentobarbitone (Sagatal, 30 mg/kg i.p.). Following anaesthesia a tracheostomy is performed and the animals are mechanically ventilated with room air (10-12 mL/kg, 60 breaths/min). A jugular vein, and a carotid artery, are cannulated for intravenous administration of test compound and collection of blood respectively. An infra-red temperature probe (Extech Instruments) is placed 3-5 mm from the tip of the left ear. Temperature measurements are recorded every minute from 5 minutes prior to test compound or nicotinic acid and up to 40 minutes post-administration of test compound or nicotinic acid. Data is automatically collected on a Psion computer before being transferred for data analysis within an Excel spreadsheet. Prior to, and at frequent time points after compound administration, blood samples (0.3 ml) are taken via the carotid arterial cannula and transferred to Microtainer (BD) tubes containing lithium heparin. The samples are mixed thoroughly on a blood roller and then stored on ice prior to centrifugation at 1200 g for 5 minutes.

Histamine

Compounds of the invention may be tested for in vitro biological activity in accordance with the following or similar assays:

H1 Receptor Cell Line Generation and FLIPR Assay Protocol

1. Generation of Histamine H1 Cell Line

The human H1 receptor can be cloned using known procedures described in the literature [Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 201 (2):894, (1994)]. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the human H1 receptor can be generated according to known procedures described in the literature [Br. J. Pharmacol., 117 (6):1071, (1996)].

Histamine H1 Functional Antagonist Assay

The histamine H1 cell line can be seeded into non-coated black-walled clear bottom 384-well tissue culture plates in alpha minimum essential medium (Gibco/Invitrogen, cat. no. 22561-021), supplemented with 10% dialyzed foetal calf serum (Gibco/Invitrogen cat. no. 12480-021) and 2 mM L-glutamine (Gibco/Invitrogen cat. No. 25030-024) and maintained overnight at 5% CO2, 37° C.

Excess medium can be removed from each well to leave 10 μl. 30 μl loading dye (250 μM Brilliant Black, 2 μM Fluo-4 diluted in Tyrodes buffer+probenecid (145 mM NaCl, 2.5 mM KCl, 10 mM HEPES, 10 mM D-glucose, 1.2 mM MgCl2, 1.5 mM CaCl2, 2.5 mM probenecid, pH adjusted to 7.40 with NaOH 1.0 M)) can be added to each well and the plates can be incubated for 60 min at 5% CO2, 37° C.

10 μl of test compound, diluted to the required concentration in Tyrodes buffer+probenecid (or 10 μl Tyrodes buffer+probenecid as a control) can be added to each well and the plate incubated for 30 min at 37° C., 5% CO2. The plates can be then placed into a FLIPR™ (Molecular Devices, UK) to monitor cell fluorescence (λex=488 nm, λEM=540 nm) in the manner described in Sullivan et al. (In: Lambert D G (ed.), Calcium Signaling Protocols, New Jersey: Humana Press, 1999, pp. 125-136) before and after the addition of 10 μl histamine at a concentration that results in the final assay concentration of histamine being EC80.

Functional antagonism is indicated by a suppression of histamine induced increase in fluorescence, as measured by the FLIPR™ system (Molecular Devices). By means of concentration effect curves, functional affinities are determined using standard pharmacological mathematical analysis.

2. H3 Receptor Cell Line Generation, Membrane Preparation And Functional GTPγS Assay Protocols

Generation of Histamine H3Cell Line

The histamine H3 cDNA can be isolated from its holding vector, pcDNA3.1 TOPO (InVitrogen), by restriction digestion of plasmid DNA with the enzymes BamH1 and Not-1 and ligated into the inducible expression vector pGene (InVitrogen) digested with the same enzymes. The GeneSwitch™ system (a system where in transgene expression is switched off in the absence of an inducer and switched on in the presence of an inducer) can be performed as described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,364,791; 5,874,534; and 5,935,934. Ligated DNA can be transformed into competent DH5α E. coli host bacterial cells and plated onto Luria Broth (LB) agar containing Zeocin™. (an antibiotic which allows the selection of cells expressing the sh ble gene which is present on pGene and pSwitch) at 50 μgml−1. Colonies containing the re-ligated plasmid can be identified by restriction analysis. DNA for transfection into mammalian cells can be prepared from 250 ml cultures of the host bacterium containing the pGeneH3 plasmid and isolated using a DNA preparation kit (Qiagen Midi-Prep) as per manufacturers guidelines (Qiagen).

CHO K1 cells previously transfected with the pSwitch regulatory plasmid (InVitrogen) can be seeded at 2×106 cells per T75 flask in Complete Medium, containing Hams F12 (GIBCOBRL, Life Technologies) medium supplemented with 10% v/v dialysed foetal bovine serum, L-glutamine, and hygromycin (100 μml−1), 24 hours prior to use. Plasmid DNA can be transfected into the cells using Lipofectamine plus according to the manufacturers guidelines (InVitrogen). 48 hours post transfection cells can be placed into complete medium supplemented with 500 μgml−1 Zeocin™.

10-14 days post selection 10 nM Mifepristone (InVitrogen), can be added to the culture medium to induce the expression of the receptor. 18 hours post induction cells can be detached from the flask using ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA; 1:5000; InVitrogen), following several washes with phosphate buffered saline pH 7.4 and resuspended in Sorting Medium containing Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), without phenol red, and supplemented with Earles salts and 3% Foetal Clone II (Hyclone). Approximately 1×107 cells can be examined for receptor expression by staining with a rabbit polyclonal antibody, 4a, raised against the N-terminal domain of the histamine H3 receptor, incubated on ice for 60 min, followed by two washes in sorting medium. Receptor bound antibody can be detected by incubation of the cells for 60 min on ice with a goat anti rabbit antibody, conjugated with Alexa 488 fluorescence marker (Molecular Probes). Following two further washes with Sorting Medium, cells can be filtered through a 50 μm Filcon™ (BD Biosciences) and then analyzed on a FACS Vantage SE Flow Cytometer fitted with an Automatic Cell Deposition Unit. Control cells can be non-induced cells treated in a similar manner. Positively stained cells can be sorted as single cells into 96-well plates, containing Complete Medium containing 500 μml−1 Zeocin™ and allowed to expand before reanalysis for receptor expression via antibody and ligand binding studies. One clone, 3H3, can be selected for membrane preparation.

Membrane Preparation from Cultured Cells

All steps of the protocol are carried out at 4° C. and with pre-cooled reagents. The cell pellet is resuspended in 10 volumes of homogenization buffer (50 mM N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N′-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 1 mM ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), pH 7.4 with KOH, supplemented with 10−6 M leupeptin (acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-arginal; Sigma L2884), 25 μgml−1 bacitracin (Sigma B0125), 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and 2×10−6 M pepstain A (Sigma)). The cells are then homogenised by 2×15 second bursts in a 1 liter glass Waring blender, followed by centrifugation at 500 g for 20 min. The supernatant is then spun at 48,000 g for 30 min. The pellet is resuspended in homogenization buffer (4× the volume of the original cell pellet) by vortexing for 5 seconds, followed by homogenization in a Dounce homogenizer (10-15 strokes). At this point the preparation is aliquoted into polypropylene tubes and stored at −80° C.

Histamine H3 Functional Antagonist Assay

For each compound being assayed, in a solid white 384 well plate, is added:—

(a) 0.5 μl of test compound diluted to the required concentration in DMSO (or 0.5 μl DMSO as a control);

(b) 30 μl bead/membrane/GDP mix prepared by mixing Wheat Germ Agglutinin Polystyrene LeadSeeker™ (WGA PS LS) scintillation proximity assay (SPA) beads with membrane (prepared in accordance with the methodology described above) and diluting in assay buffer (20 mM N-2-Hydroxyethylpiperazine-N′-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)+100 mM NaCl+10 mM MgCl2, pH 7.4 NaOH) to give a final volume of 30 μl which contains 5 μg protein and 0.25 mg bead per well, incubating at room temperature for 60 min on a roller and, just prior to addition to the plate, adding 10 μM final concentration of guanosine 5′ diphosphate (GDP) (Sigma; diluted in assay buffer); (c) 15 μl 0.38 nM [35S]-GTPγS (Amersham; Radioactivity concentration=37 MBqml; Specific activity=1160 Cimmol−1), histamine (at a concentration that results in the final assay concentration of histamine being EC80).

After 2-6 hours, the plate is centrifuged for 5 min at 1500 rpm and counted on a Viewlux counter using a 613/55 filter for 5 minplate−1. Data is analyzed using a 4-parameter logistical equation. Basal activity used as minimum i.e. histamine not added to well.

Bioavailability and CNS penetration of compounds of the invention may be assayed in the following, or similar, assays.

1. CNS Penetration Method

Compounds can be dosed intravenously at a nominal dose level of 1 mgkg-1 to male CD Sprague Dawley rats. Compounds can be formulated in 5% DMSO/45% PEG200/50% water. Blood samples can be taken under terminal anaesthesia with isoflurane at 5 min post-dose and the brains can be also removed for assessment of brain penetration. Blood samples can be taken directly into heparinised tubes. Blood samples can be prepared for analysis using protein precipitation and brain samples can be prepared using extraction of drug from brain by homogenization and subsequent protein precipitation. The concentration of parent drug in blood and brain extracts can be determined by quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis using compound-specific mass transitions.

2. Rat Pharmacokinetics Method

Compounds can be dosed to male CD Sprague Dawley rats by single intravenous or oral administration at a nominal dose level of 1 mgkg−1 and 3 mgkg−1 respectively. Compounds can be formulated in 5% DMSO/45% PEG200/50% water. An intravenous profile can be obtained by taking serial or terminal blood samples at 0.083, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 7 h post-dose. An oral profile can be obtained by taking serial or terminal blood samples at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 h post-dose. Blood samples can be taken directly into heparinised tubes. Blood samples can be prepared by protein precipitation and subjected to quantitative analysis by LC-MS/MS using compound-specific mass transitions. Drug concentration-time profiles can be generated and non-compartmental PK analysis used to generate estimates of half-life, clearance, volume of distribution and oral bioavailability.

3. Dog Pharmacokinetics Method

Compounds can be dosed to male Beagle dogs by single intravenous or oral administration at a nominal dose level of 1 mgkg−1 and 2 mgkg−1 respectively. The study can be carried out according to a crossover design such that the same dog can be used for both dosing events and the dosing events occurred 1 week apart. Compounds can be formulated in 5% DMSO/45% Peg200/50% water. An intravenous profile can be obtained by taking serial blood samples at 0.083, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 6 & 12 h post-dose. An oral profile can be obtained by taking serial blood samples at 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 & 24 h post-dose. Blood samples can be taken directly into heparinised tubes. Blood samples can be prepared by protein precipitation and subjected to quantitative analysis by LC-MS/MS using compound-specific mass transitions. Drug concentration-time profiles can be generated and non-compartmental PK analysis used to generate estimates of half-life, clearance, volume of distribution and oral bioavailability.

Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Kinase

Beta-2-Adrenergic Receptor In Vitro Functional Assay

The beta-2-adrenergic receptor functional activity of compounds of the invention can be tested follows.

Cell Seeding and Growth:

Primary bronchial smooth muscle cells from a 21 yr. old male (Clonetics, San Diego Calif.) can be seeded at 50,000 cells/well in 24-well tissue culture plates. The media used can be Clonetic's SmBM-2 supplemented with hEGF, Insulin. hFGF, and Fetal Bovine Serum. Cells can be grown two days at 37° C., 5% CO, until confluent monolayers can be seen.

Agonist Stimulation of Cells

The media can be aspirated from each well and replaced with 250 ml fresh media containing 1 mM IBMX, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (Sigma, St Louis, Mo.). Cells can be incubated for 15 minutes at 37° C., and then 250 ml of agonist at appropriate concentration can be added. Cells can be then incubated for an additional 10 minutes. Media can be aspirated and 500 ml cold 70% EtOH can be added to cells, and then removed to an empty 96-well deep-well plate after about 5 minutes. This step can be then repeated. The deep-well plate can be then spun in a speed-vac until all EtOH dried off, leaving dry pellets. cAMP (pmol/well) can be quantitated using a cAMP ELISA kit from Stratagene (La Jolla, Calif.). EC50 curves can be generated using the 4-parameter fit equation:
y=(a−d)/(1+(x/c)b)+d, where,
y=cpm a=total binding c=IC50

x=[compound] d=NS binding b=slope

Fix NS binding and allow all other parameters to float.

Beta-2-Adrenergic Receptor In Vitro Radioligand Binding Assay

The beta-1/2-adrenergic receptor binding activity of compounds of the invention can be tested follows. SF9 cell membranes containing either beta-1 or beta-2-adrenergic receptor (NEN, Boston, Mass.) can be incubated with 0.07 nM 121I-iodocyanopindolol (NEN, Boston, Mass.) in binding buffer containing 75 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.4), 12.5 mM MgCl, and 2 mM EDTA and varying concentrations of test compounds or buffer only (control) in 96-well plates. The plates can be incubated at room temperature with shaking for 1 hour. The receptor bound radioligand can be harvested by filtration over 96-well GF/B filter plates (Packard, Meriden, Conn.) pre-blocked with 0.3% polyethylenimine and washed twice with 200 μl PBS using cell harvester. The filters can be washed thrice with 200 μl PBS using cell harvester and then resuspended in 40 μl scintillation cocktail. The filter-bound radioactivity can be measured with a scintillation counter and IC50 curves are generated using the standard 4-parameter fit equation described above.

In Vivo Inhalation Guinea Pig Salivation Assay

Guinea pigs (Charles River, Wilmington, Mass.) weighing 200-350 g are acclimated to the in-house guinea pig colony for at least 3 days following arrival. Test compound or vehicle are dosed via inhalation (1H) over a 10 minute time period in a pie shaped dosing chamber (R+S Molds, San Carlos, Calif.). Test solutions are dissolved in sterile water and delivered using a nebulizer filled with 5.0 mL of dosing solution. Guinea pigs are restrained in the inhalation chamber for 30 minutes. During this time, guinea pigs are restricted to an area of approximately 110 sq. cm. This space is adequate for the animals to turn freely, reposition themselves, and allow for grooming. Following 20 minutes of acclimation, guinea pigs are exposed to an aerosol generated from a LS Star Nebulizer Set (Model 22F51, PAR1Respiratory Equipment, Inc. Midlothian, Va.) driven by house air at a pressure of 22 psi. Upon completion of nebulization, guinea pigs are evaluated at 1.5, 6, 12, 24, 48, or 72 hrs after treatment.

Guinea pigs are anesthetized one hour before testing with an intramuscular (IM) injection of a mixture of ketamine 43.75 mg/kg, xylazine 3.5 mg/kg, and acepromazine 1.05 mg/kg at an 0.88 mL/kg volume. Animals are placed ventral side up on a heated (37° C.) blanket at a 20 degree incline with their head in a downward slope. A 4-ply 2×2 inch gauze pad (Nu-Gauze General-use sponges, Johnson and Johnson, Arlington, Tex.) is inserted in the guinea pig's mouth. Five minutes later, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) is administered and the gauze pad is immediately discarded and replaced by a new pre-weighed gauze pad. Saliva is collected for 10 minutes, at which point the gauze pad is weighed and the difference in weight recorded to determine the amount of accumulated saliva (in mg). The mean amount of saliva collected for animals receiving the vehicle and each dose of test compound is calculated. The vehicle group mean is considered to be 100% salivation. Results are calculated using result means (n=3 or greater). Confidence intervals (95%) are calculated for each dose at each time point using two-way ANOVA. This model is a modified version of the procedure described in Rechter, “Estimation of anticholinergic drug effects in mice by antagonism against pilocarpine-induced salivation” Ata Pharmacol Toxicol, 1996, 24:243-254.

The mean weight of saliva in vehicle-treated animals, at each pre-treatment time, is calculated and used to compute % inhibition of salivation, at the corresponding pre-treatment time, at each dose. The inhibition dose-response data are fitted to a four parameter logistic equation using GraphPad Prism, version 3.00 for Windows (GraphPad Software, San Diego, Calif.) to estimate anti-sialagogue ID50 (dose required to inhibit 50% of pilocarpine-evoked salivation). The equation used is as follows: Y=Min+(Max−Min)/(1+10((log ID50-X)*Hillslope)) where X is the logarithm of dose, Y is the response (% inhibition of salivation). Y starts at Min and approaches asymptotically to Max with a sigmoidal shape.

The ratio of the anti-sialagogue ID50 to bronchoprotective ID50 is used to compute the apparent lung-selectivity index of the test compound. Generally, compounds having an apparent lung-selectivity index greater than about 5 are preferred.

Protein Kinase C

In Vitro Protein Kinase C (PKC) Assay

The assay components are in a total of 100 μl, including 45 mM Tris-HCl buffer pH 7.5 (Life Technologies), 0.75 mM calcium acetate (Wako), 3.6 mM magnesium chloride (Wako), 1.875 mM DL-dithiothreitol (Sigma), 18.75 μg/ml L-(α-phosphatidyl-L-serine (Sigma), 1.5 μg/ml phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (Sigma), 2.5 μM biotinylated peptide (neurogranin 28-43, Asahi Techno Glass), 10 μl of 1.0% aqueous DMSO or DMSO/inhibitor and 0.3 μM (gamma 33P) ATP (NEN). The reaction can be initiated by the addition of human recombinant PKCα (Calbiochem), PKCβ2 (Calbiochem) or PKCγ (Calbiochem or in-house preparation), incubated at room temperature for 15 minutes and stopped by adding 100 μl of 5 mg/ml streptavidin SPA beads (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech) including 50 μM ATP (Sigma), 5 mM EDTA (Dojindo) and 0.1% Triton X-100 (Wako) in phosphate-buffered saline (Nissui). The reaction mixture can be further incubated for 15 minutes, centrifuged at 1000 rpm for 1 minute and the radioactivity can be quantified by TopCount (Packard).

In Vivo Assay: Neuropathic Pain Model

Chronic constriction injury (CCI) model (Bennett et al., Pain 33 87 1988) can be used to investigate the effect of compounds on rat neuropathic pain model. SD rats (male, 8 weeks, Nippon SLC) can be used in this assay. CCI of sciatic nerve can be made by tying loose ligature with 4-0 chromic gut around aciatic nerve four times with 1 mm spacing. In sham-operated mice, the nerve can be exposed without ligation

Detection of Mechanical Allodynia

Efficacy of drugs on rat neurophatic pain model can be examined by using von Frey Hair test (Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments; North Coast Medical, Inc.). (Mechanical allodynia can be examined by using von Frey Hair (Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments; North Coast Medical, Inc.). Rats can be placed on a mesh floor, so that the plantar surface of the hindpaw can be stimulated from below. Each hair can be applied to the midplantar of hindpaw 10 times in order of increasing stiffness. The first hair in the series that evoked at least 1 response can be designated the threshold.) This test can be performed 14 days after the surgery.

Protein Kinase A

In Vitro Assay: Inhibition of Protein Kinase A Activity

The PKA kinase activity assay utilizes a radioactivity-based format in a 96-well PCR plate with radioactive readout. The PKA activity can be assayed in a 25 μL assay mixture containing 25 mM HEPES (pH 7.0), 250 μM ATP, 10 mM MgCl2, 1 mM DTT, 1 mM EDTA (pH 8). 2% DMSO. 250 ng/mL Histone H2B (Roche 223 514), and 2 ng/mL PKA (catalytic subunit, bovine heart, Calbiochem 539486, specific activity=1170 pmol/min*μg). Compounds can be screened for inhibition of the PKA kinase activity at a concentration of 10 μM. The kinase reaction can be allowed to proceed at 37° C. for 30 minutes, then the reaction can be stopped by addition of 5 μL of 0.5M EDTA (pH 8). 5 μL of each solution can be then spotted onto the corresponding square of a filtermat (8×12 glassfibre mat 90×120 mm, PE-Wallac 1450-421). The filtermat can be allowed to dry and washed once with 10% TCA, 2% PPA, 500 mM NaCl each for 30 minutes at rt. Two further washings in 10% TCA and 2% PPA for 30 minutes can be performed, then a final 30 minute wash in 99% EtOH at rt can be done and the filtermat can be air dried. The dry filtermat can be then placed in a sample bag with a Meltilex sheet (Melt-on scintillator sheets 73×109 mm, PE-Wallac 1450-441 for filtermat A) over the filtermat. The bag can be trimmed to fit into the microplate heatsealer (PE-Wallac 1495-021). The heatsealer is used to melt the Meltilex on the filtermat. The bag containing the filtermat and the melted Meltilex can be then placed into a filter cassette and counted using the Microbeta Jet Scintillation and Luminescence Counter PE-Wallac 1450.

KATP

In Vitro Binding Affinity of the Test Compounds to Rodent KATP Channels

Competitive binding experiments can be performed to characterize the affinity of the test compounds for the binding sites for sulfonylureas and KATP channel openers (═KCOs) on hamster SUR1. To assess the affinity for the sulfonylurea site membranes from COS-cells transiently expressing hamster SUR1 can be incubated in the presence of [3H] glibenclamide with increasing concentrations of test compounds. The affinity for binding to the KCO site can be assessed by incubations in the additional presence of 100 μM MgATP (see Schwanstecher M., et al. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Arch. Pharmacol. 343 (1991) 83-89 and Schwanstecher M. et al., EMBO J. 17 (1998) 5529-5535 (=Schwanstecher et al., 1998)). For each test compound 4 displacement curves can be measured (+-MgATP from the human and hamster isoform). Per curve 9-15 distinct concentrations can be tested covering the relevant range. All measurements can be repeated at least 5 times in independent experiments.

Similar to SUR1 (see above) competitive binding experiments can be performed to characterize the affinity of the test compounds for the binding sites for sulfonylureas and KCOs on rat SUR2A. The affinity for the KCO site on SUR2A can be assessed by displacement of [3H]P1075 (see Schwanstecher et al., 1998; Dorschner H. et al. Mol. Pharmacol. 55 (1999) 1060-1066 (=Dorschner et al., 1999)). The affinity of [3H]glibenclamide for the human SUR2 isoforms, however, is too weak to allow direct detection of binding using filtration assays. Therefore, two strategies can be used to detect binding to the sulfonylurea site on SUR2A. First, binding can be detected indirectly through allosteric displacement of [3H]P1075 (Dorschner et al., 1999). Second, a mutated SUR2A (SUR2AY1205S, see above) with increased affinity for [3H]glibenclamide allowing direct displacement of this tracer can be used. This second approach can be chosen to enable discrimination between allosteric and competitive interaction with the KCO site and make sure that binding of ligands which do not induce allosteric displacement are not missed.

Membranes from COS-cells transiently expressing rat SUR2A can be incubated in the presence of the radioligands with increasing concentrations of test compounds as described above. The affinity for binding to the KCO site can be assessed by incubations in the additional presence of 100 μM MgATP (Schwanstecher et al., 1991 and 1998). For each test compound 4 displacement curves can be measured (displacement of [3H]P1075 from the rat isoform of the wild type receptor and displacement of [3H]glibenclamide from the rat isoform of SUR2AY1205S). Per curve 9-15 distinct concentrations can be tested covering the relevant range. All measurements can be repeated at least 5 times in independent experiments.

[3H]P1075 (specific activity 116 Ci mmol−1) can be purchased from Amersham Buchler (Braunschweig, Germany). [3H]glibenclamide (specific activity 51 Ci mmol−1) can be obtained from NEN (Dreieich, Germany). If suitable, stock solutions can be prepared in dimethylsulfoxide with a final solvent concentration in the media below 1%.

SUR- or Kir6.x isoforms can be used either subcloned in the pcDNA (hamster SUR1, mouse Kir6.2) or pCMV vector (rat SUR2A, SUR2B).

Rodent SUR-isoforms and KATP channels can be transiently expressed in COS-1 cells as described (see Schwanstecher et al., 1998); Dorschner et al., 1999); Uhde I. et al. J Biol Chem 274 (1999) 28079-28082; Gross I. et al. Mol. Pharmacol. 56 (1999) 1370-1373; Markworth E., Diabetes 49 (2000) 1413-1418). A mutated form of the SUR2 isoforms with the phenylalanine residue in position 1205 substituted with a serine (SUR2Y1205S) can be used to allow detection of binding to the sulfonylurea site of these isoforms by displacement of [3H]glibenclamide (Uhde I., Dissertation 2001). Briefly, COS-1 cells cultured in DMEM HG (10 mM glucose), supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS), can be plated at a density of 5×105 cells per dish (94 mm) and allowed to attach overnight. For transfection the cells can be incubated 4 hours in a Tris-buffered salt solution containing DNA (5-10 μg/ml) plus DEAE-dextran (1 mg/ml), 2 min in HEPES-buffered salt solution plus dimethylsulfoxide (10%) and 4 hours in DMEM-HG plus chloroquine (100 μM). Cells can be then returned to DMEM-HG plus 10% FCS. Membranes can be prepared 60-72 h post transfection as described (Schwanstecher M. et al., Br. J. Pharmacol. 106 (1992) 295-301 (=Schwanstecher et al., 1992)). For binding experiments resuspended membranes (final protein concentration 5-50 μg/ml) can be incubated in “Tris-buffer” (50 mM, pH 7.4) containing either [3H]glibenclamide (final concentration 0.3 nM or 3 nM and nonspecific binding defined by 100 nM or 1 μM glibenclamide for SUR1 or SUR2Y1205S-isoforms, respectively) or [3H]P1075 (final concentration 3 nM, nonspecific binding defined by 100 μM pinacidil) and increasing concentrations of the test compounds. The free Mg2+ concentration can be kept close to 0.7 mM. ATP (0.1 mM) can be added to incubation media to enable KCO (e.g. diazoxide, [3H]P1075) binding (see Schwanstecher et al., 1998). Incubations can be carried out for 1 h at room temperature and can be terminated by rapid filtration through Whatman GF/B filters.

The inhibition constant (Ki value) of the test substances can be calculated from the respective IC50 value, and can be stated as the negative logarithmised value thereof (pKi).

The binding affinity and selectivity of a given compound towards SUR1 and SUR2 can be used as criteria to reflect the modulation of the K-ATP channel (e.g. NN-414, with a pKi 6.2, is 100 times more potent than diazoxide, with a pKi 3.8, to inhibit glucose-stimulated insulin release). The binding data can be used as first estimate of the potential of a given compound to preserve beta cell function and to prevent or delay the progression of diabetes.

2. In Vitro Binding Affinity of the Test Compounds to Rodent CB1 Receptors (Radioligand: Antagonist [3 H]-SR141716A)

The affinity of the compounds of the invention for cannabinoid CB1 receptors can be determined using membrane preparations of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in which the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor is stably transfected in conjunction with [3H]-SR141716A as radioligand. After incubation of a freshly prepared cell membrane preparation with the [3H]-ligand, with or without addition of compounds of the invention, separation of bound and free ligand is performed by filtration over glassfiber filters. Radioactivity on the filter is measured by liquid scintillation counting.

3. In Vitro Binding Affinity of the Test Compounds to Rodent CB1 Receptors (Radioligand: Agonist CP-55.940)

The affinity of the compounds of the invention for cannabinoid CB1 receptors can be determined using membrane preparations of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in which the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor is stably transfected in conjunction with [3H]CP-55,940 as radioligand. After incubation of a freshly prepared cell membrane preparation with the [3H]-ligand, with or without addition of compounds of the invention, separation of bound and free ligand is performed by filtration over glassfiber filters. Radioactivity on the filter is measured by liquid scintillation counting.

4. Functional Activity of the Test Compounds at Human Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors

In vitro CB1 receptor antagonism can be assessed with the human CB1 receptor cloned in CHO cells. CHO cells can be grown in a Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's culture medium (=DMEM) and supplemented with 10% heat-inactivated fetal calf serum. The medium can be aspirated and replaced by DMEM, without fetal calf serum, but containing [3H]-arachidonic acid and incubated overnight in a cell culture stove (5% CO2/95% air; 37° C.; water-saturated atmosphere). During this period [3H]-arachidonic acid can be incorporated in membrane phospholipids. On the test day, medium can be aspirated and cells can be washed three times using 0.5 mL DMEM, containing 0.2% bovine serum albumin (BSA). Stimulation of the CB1 receptor by WIN 55,212-2 led to activation of PLA2 followed by release of [3H]-arachidonic acid into the medium. This WIN 55,212-2-induced release can be concentration-dependently antagonized by CB1 receptor antagonists. The CB1 antagonistic potencies of the test compounds are expressed as pA2 values.

5. Determination of the Antagonist Effects of Compounds on Insulin Secretion in Rat Perifused Pancreatic Islets—Simple Screen for Antagonist Activity

Animals: Male Wistar rats in the weight range 175-200 g can be group housed in standard animal cages at a temperature of 21+−2° C. and humidity of 55+−10%. Animals can be maintained on a 12 h light-dark cycle (lights on 06.00-18.00 h) with free access to standard rodent diet (B&K Universal Ltd standard rat and mouse diet (BK 001P), Beekay Feeds, B&K Universal Ltd, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire) and tap water. The rats should be accustomed to these conditions for at least one week before experimentation.

Experimental procedures: After the rats are sacrificed, the branch of the bile duct leading to the liver and the duodenal end of the duct in the pancreas can be clamped and the pancreas distended by injection of ice-cold 0.9 mg/ml collagenase solution into the bile duct. The pancreas can be then removed and incubated statically for 10-12 min at 37° C. Following the incubation, 10 ml of cold buffer can be added and the suspension shaken vigorously by hand for 1 min. The islets can be allowed to settle for 5 min on ice and washed three times using ice-cold buffer. Well formed and good sized islets from 3 rats can be hand-picked (under a low power microscope) and pooled and a final selection of islet transferred to the perifusion apparatus. Oxygenated (95% O2/5% CO2) Gey & Gey buffer containing 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin and 4 mM glucose can be used throughout the experiment unless otherwise stated (see Dickinson et al. Eur J Pharmacol 1997; 339:69-76 for further details).

Compounds can be either tested at an advised concentration or the solubility can be determined in the experimental conditions and a maximum soluble drug concentration used for experiments (DMSO or ethanol will be used as the solvents at a maximum 0.1% in the assay buffer).

On each day, two experiments can be performed in parallel in 2 identical, independent sets of perifusion apparatus each consisting of sufficient number of chambers. Each chamber can be loaded with 20 hand-picked islets. Islets can be perifused for an initial 30 min period in media containing 4 mM glucose. Perifusate can be then collected at 2 min intervals for the remainder of the experiment. After the first 10 min of the experiment (to collect baseline insulin values), the media in each chamber can be switched to one containing 11 mM glucose and the relevant drug concentration/vehicle/diazoxide concentration and perifusate collected for a further 62 min to produce a total of 36 fractions for each chamber.

Perifusate samples can be then pooled to create 3 samples per chamber as follows: Baseline (4 mM): Samples 1-5 (first 10 minutes); 0-30 minutes (11 mM glucose): Samples 6-21; 30-60 minutes (11 mM glucose): Samples 22-36

Perifusate fractions can be stored at −75° C. until required for insulin assay. Insulin content of fractions can be assayed using a 96-well ELISA assay (Mercodia). Initial insulin assays can be performed in triplicate on three pooled fractions from each chamber (18 samples per experiment, 108 samples in total for 6 experiments).

Protease Activated Receptor (PAR1)

In Vitro Testing Procedure for Thrombin Receptor Antagonists:

Preparation of [3H]haTRAP: A(pF-F)R(ChA)(hR)(I2—Y)—NH2 (1.03 mg) and 10% Pd/C (5.07 mg) can be suspended in DMF (250 μl) and diisopropylethylamine (10 μl). The vessel can be attached to the tritium line, frozen in liquid nitrogen and evacuated. Tritium gas (342 mCi) can be then added to the flask, which can be stirred at room temperature for 2 hours. At the completion of the reaction, the excess tritium can be removed and the reacted peptide solution can be diluted with DMF (0.5 ml) and filtered to remove the catalyst. The collected DMF solution of the crude peptide can be diluted with water and freeze dried to remove the labile tritium. The solid peptide can be redissolved in water and the freeze drying process repeated. The tritiated peptide ([3H]haTRAP) can be dissolved in 0.5 ml of 0.1% aqueous TFA and purified by HPLC using the following conditions: column, Vydac C18, 25 cm×9.4 mm I.D.; mobile phase, (A) 0.1% TFA in water, (B) 0.1% TFA in CH3CN; gradient, (A/B) from 100/0 to 40/60 over 30 min; flow rate, 5 ml/min; detection, UV at 215 nm. The radiochemical purity of [3H]haTRAP can be 99% as analyzed by HPLC. A batch of 14.9 mCi at a specific activity of 18.4 Ci/mmol can be obtained.

Preparation of Platelet Membranes: Platelet Membranes can be Prepared using a modification of the method of Natarajan et al (Natarajan et al, Int. J. Petide Protein Res., vol. 45, pp. 145-151 (1995) from 20 units of platelet concentrates obtained from the North Jersey Blood Center (East Orange, N.J.) within 48 hours of collection. All steps can be carried out at 40° C. under approved biohazard safety conditions. Platelets can be centrifuged at 100×g for 20 minutes at 40° C. to remove red cells. The supernatants can be decanted and centrifuged at 3000×g for 15 minutes to pellet platelets. Platelets can be resuspended in 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5, 150 mM NaCl, 5 mM EDTA, to a total volume of 200 ml and centrifuged at 4400×g for 10 minutes. This step can be repeated two additional times. Platelets can be resuspended in 5 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5, 5 mM EDTA to a final volume of approximately 30 ml and can be homogenized with 20 strokes in a Dounce homogenizer. Membranes can be pelleted at 41,000×g, resuspended in 40-50 ml 20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5, 1 mM EDTA, 0.1 mM dithiothreitol, and 10 ml aliquots can be frozen in liquid N2 and stored at −80° C. To complete membrane preparation, aliquots can be thawed, pooled, and homogenized with 5 strokes of a Dounce homogenizer. Membranes can be pelleted and washed 3 times in 10 mM triethanolamine-HCl, pH 7.4, 5 mM EDTA, and resuspended in 20-25 ml 50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5, 10 mM MgCl2, 1 mM EGTA, and 1% DMSO. Aliquots of membranes can be frozen in liquid N2 and stored at −80° C. Membranes can be stable for at least 3 months. 20 units of platelet concentrates typically yielded 250 mg of membrane protein. Protein concentration can be determined by a Lowry assay (Lowry et al, J. Biol. Chem., vol. 193, pp. 265-275 (1951).

High Throughput Thrombin Receptor Radioligand Binding Assay: Thrombin receptor antagonists can be screened using a modification of the thrombin receptor radioligand binding assay of Ahn et al. (Ahn et al, Mol. Pharmacol., vol. 51, p. 350-356 (1997). The assay can be performed in 96 well Nunc plates (Cat. No. 269620) at a final assay volume of 200 μl. Platelet membranes and [3H]haTRAP can be diluted to 0.4 mg/ml and 22.2 nM, respectively, in binding buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5, 10 mM MgCl2, 1 mM EGTA, 0.1% BSA). Stock solutions (10 mM in 100% DMSO) of test compounds can be further diluted in 100% DMSO. Unless otherwise indicated, 10 μl of diluted compound solutions and 90 μl of radioligand (a final concentration of 10 nM in 5% DMSO) can be added to each well, and the reaction can be started by the addition of 100 μl of membranes (40 μg protein/well). Compounds can be tested at three concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 μM). The plates can be covered and vortex-mixed gently on a Lab-Line Titer Plate Shaker for 1 hour at room temperature. Packard UniFilter GF/C filter plates can be soaked for at least 1 hour in 0.1% polyethyleneimine. The incubated membranes can be harvested using a Packard FilterMate Universal Harvester and can be rapidly washed four times with 300 μl ice cold 50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5, 10 mM MgCl2, 1 mM EGTA. MicroScint 20 scintillation cocktail (25 μl) can be added to each well, and the plates can be counted in a Packard TopCount Microplate Scintillation Counter. The specific binding can be defined as the total binding minus the nonspecific binding observed in the presence of excess (50 μM) unlabeled haTRAP. The % Inhibition by a compound of [3H]haTRAP binding to thrombin receptors can be calculated from the following relationship: % Inhibition=Total x x binding−Binding x x in x x the x x presence x x of x x a x x test x x compound Total x x binding−Nonspecific x x binding 100

Affinity values (Ki) can be then determined using the following formula: K i=IC 50 l+[concentration x x of x x radioligand affinity x x (K D) x x of x x radioligand] Hence, a lower value of Ki indicates greater binding affinity.

A(pF-F)R(ChA)(hR)Y—NH2 and A(pF-F)R(ChA)(hR)(Ihd 2-Y)—NH2, can be custom synthesized by AnaSpec Inc. (San Jose, Calif.). The purity of these peptides can be >95%. Tritium gas (97%) can be purchased from EG&G Mound, Miamisburg Ohio. The gas can be subsequently loaded and stored on an IN/US Systems Inc. Trisorber. MicroScint 20 scintillation cocktail can be obtained from Packard Instrument Co.

Protocol for Ex-Vivo Platelet Aggregation in Cynomolgus Whole Blood Drug Administration and Blood Collection.

Conscious chaired cynomolgus monkeys are allowed to equilibrate for 30 min. A needle catheter is inserted into a brachial vein for infusion of test drugs. Another needle catheter is inserted into the other brachial or saphenous vein and used for blood sampling. In those experiments where the compound is administered orally only one catheter is used. A baseline blood sample (1-2 ml) is collected in vacutainer tubes containing a thrombin inhibitor CVS 2139 (100 μg/0.1 ml saline) as an anticoagulant. The drug is then infused intravenously over a period of 30 min. Blood samples (1 ml) are collected at 5, 10, 20, 30 min during and 30, 60, 90 min after termination of the drug infusion. In PO experiments the animals are dosed with the drug using a gavage cannula. Blood samples are collected at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360 min after dosing. 0.5 ml of the blood is used for whole blood aggregation and the other 0.5 ml is used for determining the plasma concentration of the drug or its metabolites. Aggregation is performed immediately after collection of the blood sample as described below.

Whole Blood Aggregation

A 0.5 ml blood sample is added to 0.5 ml of saline and warmed to 37° C. in a Chronolog whole blood aggregometer. Simultaneously, the impedance electrode is warmed in saline to 37° C. The blood sample with a stir bar is placed in the heating block well, the impedance electrode is placed in the blood sample and the collection software is started. The software is allowed to run until the baseline is stabilized and then a 20 .OMEGA. calibration check is performed. 20 .OMEGA. is equal to 4 blocks on the graphic produced by the computer software. The agonist (haTRAP) is added by an adjustable volume pipette (5-25 μl) and the aggregation curve is recorded for 10 minutes. Maximum aggregation in 6 minutes following agonist addition is the value recorded.

In Vitro Platelet Aggregation Procedure:

Platelet aggregation studies can be performed according to the method of Bednar et al. (Bednar, B., Condra, C., Gould, R. J., and Connolly, T. M., Throm. Res., vol. 77, pp. 453-463 (1995)). Blood can be obtained from healthy human subjects who are aspirin free for at least 7 days by venipuncture using ACD as anticoagulant.

Platelet rich plasma can be prepared by centrifugation at 100×g for 15 minutes at 15° C. Platelets can be pelleted at 3000×g and washed twice in buffered saline containing 1 mM EGTA and 20 μg/ml apyrase to inhibit aggregation. Aggregation can be performed at room temperature in buffered saline supplemented with 0.2 mg/ml human fibrinogen. Test compound and platelets can be preincubated in 96-well flat-bottom plates for 60 minutes. Aggregation can be initiated by adding 0.3 μM haTRAP or 0.1 U/ml thrombin and rapidly vortexing the mixture using a Lab Line Titer Plate Shaker (speed 7). Percent aggregation can be monitored as increasing light transmittance at 405 nm in a Spectromax Plate Reader.

In Vivo Antitumor Procedure:

Tests in the human breast carcinoma model in nude mouse are conducted according to the procedure reported in S. Even-Ram et. al., Nature Medicine, 4, 8, pp. 909-914 (1988).

Toll-like Receptor

In Vitro Screening of a Library of Small Molecules for Inhibitors of Human TLR9 (and similarly for TLR3)

Candidate small molecules for initial screening can be obtained from a commercially available library of 880 off-patent small molecules selected for structural diversity and proven bioavailability in humans (Prestwick Chemical Library). Human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells stably transfected with a human TLR9 (hTLR9) expression vector can be incubated overnight in the presence of 50 nM CpG ODN 2006 (i.e., the EC50 concentration of ODN 2006) and selected small molecule candidate compounds at different concentrations ranging from 5×10−7 M to 5×10−5 M. TLR9 activity can be assayed in terms of induction of a 6×NF-.kappa.B-luciferase reporter construct cotransfected in the cells. Results can be measured as fold induction over baseline luciferase activity measured in the absence of ODN 2006 and compared to fold induction over baseline in the presence of the EC50 concentration of ODN 2006 alone. From this initial screening a number of small molecules can be identified as lead compounds and can be categorized by structure and activity. Additional screening can be performed in like manner using additional small molecules selected from another library or specifically prepared for this purpose.

The method is described in greater detail as follows. The cells for each individual cell clone (hTLR3-NF.kappa.B-293, hTLR7-NF.kappa.B-293, hTLR8-NF.kappa.B-293 and hTLR9-NF.kappa.B-293) can be counted and seeded one day before the stimulation at 1.5×104 cells per well in 96-well cell culture plates. To become adherent the cells can be incubated after seeding overnight at 37° C. in 5% CO2 humidified air.

The screen for each compound can be performed at the same time for all of the receptors TLR3, TLR7, TLR8 and TLR9. Up to fifteen test compounds, each assayed in duplicate at each of three different final concentrations (0.5 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, and 50 μg/ml), can be used for 16 h cell stimulation on a single multiwell culture plate. A 4× final concentration master plate can be created to prepare the different test compounds before they can be added to the cells.

For TLR3, candidate small molecules for initial screening can be identified in an assay except HEK293 cells can be stably transfected with a human TLR3 (hTLR3) expression vector and incubated overnight in the presence of 2.5 μg/ml poly(I:C) (EC50 of poly(I:C) for TLR3) and selected small molecule candidate compounds at different concentrations ranging from 5×10−7 M to 5×10−5 M. TLR3 activity can be assayed in terms of induction of a 6×NF-.kappa.B-luciferase reporter construct cotransfected in the cells. Results can be expressed as fold induction over baseline luciferase activity measured in the absence of poly(I:C). From this initial screening a number of small molecules can be identified as lead compounds and can be categorized by structure and activity. Additional screening can be performed in like manner using additional small molecules selected from another library or specifically prepared for this purpose. Scoring is reported as above but as applied to TLR3.

Controls can be added as duplicates individually for each cell clone on the cell culture plate. Positive controls can be used as follows (final concentrations): 50 μg/ml poly(I:C) for hTLR3-NF.kappa.B-293; 8 μM resiquimod (R848) for hTLR7-NF.kappa.B-293; 30 μM R848 for hTLR8-NF.kappa.B-293; and 2.5 μM CpG-ODN 2006 for hTLR9-NF.kappa.B-293. Media alone can be used as negative control. After addition of controls and small molecules, the cell clones can be additionally stimulated with the EC50 concentration of the appropriate receptor-specific ligand.

To calculate the baseline response to the EC50 concentration of the appropriate receptor-specific ligand, wells H3 and H6 did not receive receptor-specific ligand. The mean value of wells H2 and H5 (each with cells and EC50 concentration of the appropriate receptor-specific ligand) divided by the mean of wells H3 and H6 (each with cells alone) yielded the baseline response (i.e., fold induction of luciferase activity) to EC50 concentration of the appropriate receptor-specific ligand.

After 16 h stimulation the supernatant can be removed and the cells treated with lysis buffer and stored at −80° C. before measuring.

In Vivo Screening of Selected Small Molecules

Experimental mice are administered known amounts of candidate small molecules and a source of PAMP or other suitable TLR ligand, e.g., CpG nucleic acid. Negative control mice receive the source of PAMP or other suitable TLR ligand, e.g., CpG nucleic acid, alone. After an appropriate period, blood samples are obtained from control and experimental mice and evaluated for serum concentration of cytokine using a suitable method, e.g., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Alternatively or in addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are isolated from both groups of animals and assessed for expression of activation marker using a suitable technique such as fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Control and experimental results are compared in pairwise fashion. Reduced expression of activation marker or reduced concentration of cytokine in an experimental animal compared to a negative control animal indicates the small molecule inhibits TLR-mediated signaling in response to a ligand for the TLR. Increased expression of activation marker or increased concentration of cytokine in an experimental animal compared to a negative control animal indicates the small molecule promotes TLR-mediated signaling in response to a ligand for the TLR.

In Vivo Screening of Selected Small Molecules

Experimental mice are administered candidate small molecules. Negative control mice are administered carrier alone. After administration or small molecule or carrier alone, PBMC are isolated and then exposed in vitro to CpG nucleic acid under conditions in which the PBMC, in the absence of small molecule, are stimulated to express an activation marker such as CD86 or secrete a product such as cytokine (e.g., IFN-α, IL-6, TNF-α) or chemokine (e.g., IP-10). The expression of the activation marker or the secretion of the product is quantified using FACS, ELISA, or other suitable method, and comparison is made between results obtained with and without the small molecule. Reduced expression of activation marker or reduced concentration of cytokine in an experimental animal compared to a negative control animal indicates the small molecule inhibits TLR-mediated signaling in response to a ligand for the TLR. Increased expression of activation marker or increased concentration of cytokine in an experimental animal compared to a negative control animal indicates the small molecule promotes TLR-mediated signaling in response to a ligand for the TLR.

It is understood that the examples and embodiments described herein are for illustrative purposes only and that various modifications or changes in light thereof will be suggested to persons skilled in the art and are to be included within the spirit and purview of this application and scope of the appended claims. All publications, patents, and patent applications cited herein are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety for all purposes.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification546/13
International ClassificationC07F5/02, A61K31/69
Cooperative ClassificationA61K45/06, C07F5/025, A61K31/69
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