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Publication numberUS851389 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1907
Filing dateDec 6, 1905
Priority dateDec 6, 1905
Publication numberUS 851389 A, US 851389A, US-A-851389, US851389 A, US851389A
InventorsCameron B Waterman
Original AssigneeWaterman Marine Motor Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boat-propelling device.
US 851389 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED APR. 23, 1907.

C. B. WATERMAN. BOAT PROPELLING DEVICE.

APPLIOATION FILED DEC. 6. 1906.

mi v.

/NVENTOE, -CAMEHON- s WATER/WAN- g WITNESSES im 1 g ATT'Y UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CAMERON B. WATERMAN, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, ASSIGNOR TO THE WATERMAN MARINE MOTOR COMPANY, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, A

CORPORATION OF MICHIGAN.

BOAT-PROPELLING DEVICE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

)Patented April 23, 1907.

Application filed December 6, 1905. Serial No. 290,624.

To all m/mm it may concern:

Be it known that I, CAMERON B. WATER- MAN, a citizen of the United States of America, residing at Detroit, in the county of Wayne and State of Michigan, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Boat-Propelling Devices, of which the following is a specification, reference being had therein to the accompanying drawings.

My invention relates to new and useful improvements in boat propelling devices and particularly in the construction and combi raising the motor to lift the propeller and shaft from the water and means for securing the parts in their raised position, so that they will not drag when it is desired to propel the boat by other means, as by sail or oars.

A third object of my invention is to obviate the overheating liable to be caused in an air-cooled motor when the speed of propulsion will not produce an air current sullicient to lower the temperature of the motor to the 7 required point.

In the drawings, Figure 1 shows a side elevation of my motor applied to the stern of a boat; Figs. 2 and 3 are rear and front elevations respectively; Figs. 4 and 5 are vertical longitudinal sections of the upper end lower supporting bearings shown in large scale.

A is a boat having a transom A,

and a stern thwart a.-

B is a supporting post preferably of tubing and is secured to the boat by means ofupper and lower clamps. The upper clamp comprises a vertical member having downwardlyextending furcations C for engaging the transom and secured thereto by a clamping screw 0 having a screw threaded engagement with one of said furcations C, and a normally horizontal member having one end bifurcated .to engage the rojection C be tween the furcations C an the other end 0 a keel A? sleeved on the post B. The furcations C are adjustably secured to C by means of a bolt 0 passing through C C". A series of apertures being provided in C the upper end of the post may be set at difierent distances from the transom to vary the pitch of the propeller shaft, as desired. The lower clamp consists of a cup-shaped ste bearing or socket D in which is stopped the. ower end of the post B and is bifurcated at (Z and pro vided with a wing screw 61 passing through one of the furcations whereby it is secured to the keel or stern 0st of the boat.

E is a motor aving a cylinder E and a crank case E preferably formed in two sections 6 e in the ordinary manner, the sections being held together by bolts 6' passing through both sections.- The motor is supported on the post B by means of brackets or arms F extending from collars F sleeved on the post and fixed thereto by pins or by brazing. It is obvious that each arm may be separately attached to the post if desired but I prefer to form them in pairs integral with the collars F. The ends of the arms are bent and slotted to engage the bolts e so that the position of the motorrelative to the arms may be adjusted.

The motor shaft G projects from both sides of the crank case and on the'end between the post and the motor is keyed or otherwise suitably secured a sprocket H. On the opposite end of the shaft G are ratchet teeth G for enga ement with the teeth J of a starting crank (l which is preferablyloosely sleeved on the reduced end 9 of the shaft G.

At a suitable distance below the motorare propeller shaft bearings K preferably formed in the apexes of V-shaped supports K, the ends of the supports being secured to the motor by engagement with the ends of the two lower bolts a The ends of the supports are slotted at is so that the bolts may be moved therein to adjust the propeller shaft in relation to the motor. Mounted in these bearings is a ropeller shaft L-havin one end rounded to fit loosely in a recess Ii in the lower end ofpost B just above the socket I) of the lower clamp, the recess thus forming a thrust bearing for the shaft, and on the other end of the shaft is secured api opeller wheel L A sprocket H is keyed on the propeller g or shield M to the upper pair on the tiller, rod R bell crank lever R piv- 4o I parts.

shaft in alignment with the sprocket and an endless chain H carried by these sprockets transmits power from the motor-shaft to the propeller. .It is obvious that a vertical shaft with bevel gears may be used in place of the chain and sprockets if desired, without departing from the scope of my invention.

I prefer to employ an air-cooled motor on account of-its weight but the transom of the boat is liable to shutoff most of what little air current is caused by the motion of the boat and when run at a high speed there is great danger of overheating. This difficulty I have obviated by setting the cooling flanges M with a slight downward pitch from the front to the back of the motor, as clearly shown in Fig. 1, and by securin v I arms F, so that the water thrown upwards by the chain II when runnin above normal speed will be deflected and t rown upon the flanges M. The pitch of these flanges will carry a portion of the water around to the back of the motor.

and the consequent rapid evaporation will supplement the air cooling. If desired, I may form grooves the flanges to further assist in distributing the water.

On the upper end of the post B I secure a tiller N sleeved on the post and pinned as at n. A gasoline tank 0 is secured on the tiller by means of metal straps O or by any other suitable means and between this tank and the motor is the carburetor P connected to the motor intake by a gas conduit P and to the tank by a gasoline. conduit P. On the tiller is a sector Q to which is pivoted a hand lever Q connected to the commutator S by means of rod- R, bell crank lever R pivoted oted on the motor, and rod R The commutator may thus be adjusted by means of the lever Q and if desired I may arrange a lever adjacent thereto with connections for adjusting the throttle or the mixture.

The batteries T and coil T are placed in any suitable place in the boat, preferably under thjesternthwart a, and are electrically connectedtconnections not shown) to the commutator S and spark plug S in any ordinarymanner, as the wiring may-be connected in different ways well known to those skilled in the art and depends largely upon the style of coil and commutator employed, I shall not further describe it.

When it is desired to raise the propeller and shaft from the water, the post B is raised from the step bearing D and slides through the sleeved portion 0 of the upper clamp, carrying the motor, propeller, tiller, and all When raised the required distance, a wing screw passing through a screw-threaded aperture in 0 is tightened to engage the post B and the parts are thus held in their raised position. The tiller is then pressed downwards, tilting the motor and a deflector other parts, as shown in dotted lines in Fig.

1, so that the sprocket H and propeller are entirely clear of the water. The device 1s held in this position by a hook-ended rod U engaging a suitable ring or staple U in the thwart a and the tiller or a suitable ring U attached to the tiller.

While I have shown and described specific forms of clamps, I do not Wish to limit mgself to these, as any form of clamp may. 0 used without departing from the scope of my invention. I prefer, however, to usea form of clamp which may be attached to any boat without the use of tools and which will permit of the raising alone or the tilting alone or the raising and tilting combined to elevate the propeller above the water.

When the larger sizes of motors are employed, as for instance, for use on sail boats, I may, if desired, provide clamps which Wlll engage the post B slidably but not rotatably, allowing the boat to be steered by her own rudder. This of course can only be done where the Inotor is attached to the over-hang of the stern aft of the rudder.

With the motor'as shown, the pivotal arrangement of the motor and propeller mits steering the boat thereby and the w ole device may be started and operated from the stern thwart and if it is desired to install the 5 on the outside of a boat, of an explosive motor, means for securing the crank case of said motor to said frame, a shaft. on said motor, a

propeller shaft supported below and parallel i with said motor shaft, and a drive connection therebetween.

'2. In a boat propelling device, the combination with a motor, of a motor-supporting frame therefor arranged to be attached to' the outside of a boat, a propeller shaft, a support having bearings therefor carried by and depending from said motor, and a drive connection from the motor to said shaft.

3. In a boat propelling device, the combination with a frame adapted to be secured on the outside of a boat, amotor mounted thereon, a propeller shaft driven and 'suported by said motor, and a thrust bearing or said shaft on said frame.

4, In a boat propelling device, the combination with clamps adapted to be attached I to a boat, of a frame pivoted in said clamps, a motor supported on said frame,,ashaft in said motor, and a propeller shaft supported by said motor and having a drive connection with said motor shaft.

5. In a boat propelling device, the combination of an internal combustion engine,

meansv for securing it. outside of a boat, a shaft support depending from the engine, a propeller shaft journaled therein parallel with the engine shaft, and a drive connection between said shafts.

6. In a boat propelling device, the combination of a frame adapted to be secured on the outside of a boat, a motor thereon, a shaft support depending from the motor, a propeller shaft therein, a thrust bearing for the shaft in the frame, and a drive gear from the motor to said shaft.

7. The combination with an air cooled internal combustion motor adapted to be secured on the outside of a boat, a propeller shaft driven by the motor shaft, and means associated with said propeller shaft for rais ing water and directing it upon the cylinder to supplement the air cooling.

-8. The combination with a boat, of an externally supported air cooled internal combustion engine therefor a propeller shaft below the same, a drive connection from the engine to the shaft, adapted to raise water in the operation of the engine, and means for directing saidwater upon the engine cylinder.

9. The combination with a boat, of an externally supported air cooled internal combustion engine, a propeller driven thereby, and means operable when the propeller is in motion-for delivering water upon the engine cylinder to supplement the air cooling.

10. The combination with a normally air cooled internal combustion marine motor and a shaft therefor, of 'a propeller shaft journalled below said motor, sprockets on said shafts, a chain engaging said sprockets to drive said propeller shaft and to raise water and a deflector for directing said water upon said motor, for the purpose described.

11. The combination with a small boat, such as a row boat, of a substantially vertical post swivelled to the stern thereof, a motor mounted on'the est, a shaft bearing supported by and be ow the motor, a propeller shaft journalled-therein and having a drive connection with said motor, and a thrust bearing for the shaft in the post.

12. The combination with a swivelled post, of brackets projecting outward therefrom, a motor supported on the brackets, a depending shaft support carried by the motor, a propeller shaft therein operatively connected to the motor, and a thrust bearing for theshaft in the post.

13. The combinationwith a swivelled post,

brackets projecting outward therefrom, a motor supported on the brackets, a depend- ,ing shaft support carried by the motor, a

propeller shaft therein, a thrust bearing for the-shaft in the post and a drive connection on the shaft between said thrust bearing and said shaft support.

14. The combination with a boat, a post hinged to the stern thereof for adjustment about horizontal and vertical axes, a step bearing for the lower end of the post and a motor, propeller shaft, and drive connection supported on the post.

15. In a boat propelling device, the combination with a frame, an explosive motor supported thereon, and a propeller wheel having a drive connection with said motor, of means adapted to be clamped to a boat, and means connecting said clamping means to said frame and permitting said frame to be raised vertically and tilted in a vertical plane in relation to said clamping means.

16. In a boat propelling device, the combination with a frame, an explosive motor supported thereon, and a propeller wheel having a drive connection with said motor, of means adapted to be clamped to the outside of the boat, and a link having a horizontal pivotal connection with said means and sleeved on'said frame for the purpose described.

17. In a boat propelling device, the combination with a frame, an explosive motor supported thereon, and a propeller wheel having a drive connection with said motor,

ofmeans adapted to be clamped to a boat, a link slidably attached to said frame, and a horizontal pivot adjustably connecting said link to said clamping means, for the purpose described;

18. In a boat repelling device, the com bination with a ffame arranged for horizontal and vertical pivotal attachment to a boat of an explosive motor mounted on said frame, a propeller mounted below said motor and having a drive connection therewith, a tiller attached to said frame, and motor-controlling means carricd by said tiller.

19. In a-boat-propelling device, the combination with a boat, of a frame adapted to be removably pivoted thereon, a motor, proeller, and drive connections carried bysaid frame, a tiller rigidly secured to said frame, and motor-controlling means and fuel-supply receptacle carried by said tiller.

20. In a boat propelling device, the combination with a clamping member arranged to detachably engage the stern of a boat, of a post, brackets projecting laterally from said post, a motor supported by said brackets a propeller shaft projecting laterally from said postbelow said motor, a driving connection between said motor and shaft, and adjustable connecting means between said post and said clamping member for regulating the pitch of said propeller shaft.

21. In a boat propelling device, the combination with a post and a motor carried thereby, of a member sleeved on said post adjustment, and a clam arranged to be attached to the stern of a. oat and adjustably post to adjust said drive connection.

and longitudinally adjustable in relation thereto, means for limiting said longitudinal connected to said member for varying the angle of said post to the stern of the boat, for the purpose described.

22. In a boat propelling device, the com bination with a post arranged to be secured to the outside of a boat, of a motor and propeller carried thereby, a drive connection between said motor and propeller and means for adjusting said motor in relation to said 23. The combination with a lower sup- Iporting stepped bracket and an upper bracket 1 aving a tubular bearing, said brackets being adapted to be detachably clamped to the stern of a boat, of a vertical motor-supporting frame engaging said stepped bracket and having a sliding pivotal engagement with the bearing in said upper bracket, and means for rigidly securing said tubular bearing to said frame, for the purpose described.

24. In a boat propelling device, the combination with an internal combustion engine and means for pivotally supporting said engine on the outside of a boat, of a horizontal shaft in said engine, a shaft support depending from and swinging with the engine, a propeller shaft journaled in said support, and-a drive connection from the engine shaft to the propeller shaft.

In testimony whereof I aiIiX my signature in presence of two witnesses.

CAMERON B. WATERMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2722193 *Aug 30, 1952Nov 1, 1955Richard B BrindleyBelt driven outboard marine motors
US3377978 *Aug 2, 1965Apr 16, 1968Russell I. TillmanPower boat outdrive assemblies
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB63H20/12