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Publication numberUS852375 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 30, 1907
Filing dateFeb 19, 1906
Priority dateFeb 19, 1906
Publication numberUS 852375 A, US 852375A, US-A-852375, US852375 A, US852375A
InventorsCortland Carlton
Original AssigneeNat Perforating Machine Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper perforating or impressing machine.
US 852375 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED APR. 30. 1907..

. c. C RLTON; PAPER PBRFORATING 0R IMPRBSSING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED 1563.19.1908.

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No. 852,375. PATENTBD APR. 30, 1907.- 0. CARLTON.

PAPER PERPORATING 0R IMPRESSING MACHINE.

APPLICATION rum) mm. is, 19061 4 sums-slum z.

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rut mmms rrrsns co" wAsmmzmx, n. c.

- /%./@WJU% mm 110152375. PATENTEDTAPR. so, 1907. Y 0.- CARLTON.

PAPER PERFORA'TING 0R IMPRES'SING MACHINE.

APPLIOATION FILED T313. 19. 1906.

. 4 SHEETS-SHEET 3,

i 221i? I PATENTB'D APR. 30, 1907..

0. CARLTON. PAPER PERPORATING 0R IMPRESSING MACHINE.

4 SHEETS TINTTE STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CORTLAND CARLTON, OF KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI, ASSIGNOR TO NATIONAL PERFORATING MACHINE COMPANY, OF KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI, A

CORPORATION.

PAPER PERFORATING OR IMPRESSING MACHINE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented April 30, 1907.

Application filed February 19,1906. Serial No. 301,753.

To all whom it nw/r concern' Be it known that I, CORTLAND CARLTON, a citizen of the United States, residing at Kansas City, in the county of Jackson and. State of hlissouri, have invented new and useful Improvements in Paper Perforating or I'mpressing Machines, of which the following is a specification, reference being rad to the acco mpanying drawings, forming a part thereof.

This invention relates to improvements in machines for impressing lines upon sheets of paper for the purpose of facilitating division of such sheets upon the impressed lines. The particular method which is employ ed in this machine does not amount to perforating, but has the same purpose so 'far as facilitating the division of the paper, and may therefore he termed .impressing or perforating.

The invention consists of the features of construction set out in the claims.

In the drawings s-Figure 1-is a top plan view. Fig. 2 is a side elevation. Fig. 3 is a section at the line 3-3 on Fig. 1. Fig. +1 is a detail section in the same plane as Fig. 3, showing the feeding devices in a different position from Fig. 3. Fig. 5 is a detail section at the line on Fig. 3. .Fig. 6 is a side elevation of a part of a cam wheel consisting of several parts, showing the portion thereof for controlling the perforating disks and an index plate for adjusting the same. Fig. 7 is a partly sectional elevation of the remainder of the cam wheel showing the parts for controlling the feed, section hcing made at the plane indicated by the line 7 7 on Fig. 9. Fig. 8 is an edge elevation of the entire cam wheel and a portion of its shaft. Fig. 9 is a section at the line 99 on Figs. 6 and 7. F 10 is a detail section at the line 1()-1() on Fig. 1. Fig. 11 is an end elevation of a deflecting horn or curler shown in Fig. 10.

This machine has its operating parts mo .Inted in two end standards, 1, 1, connected rigidly by transverse tie-rods or braces, 2, 2. It comprises a rotating platen or paperpporting cylinder, 3, mounted rigidly on a shaft, 1, which is ournaled in the end standards, 1, 1, and rotated by any convenient means of applying power to such shaft. Cooperating with the cylinder for the purpose of impressing the paper at the lines for subdivision are the impressing or perforating disks, 5, mounted, as more particularly hereinafter described, in carriages which are con nected with a rock-shaft, (3, jorrnaled in the end standards. The paper is fed onto the platen cylinder, 3, by means of a lower and an upper feed-roll, 7 and 8, respectively. The lower feed-roll is journaled at its ends in the end standards, 1, 1, at the receiving side of the platen cylinder, 3, at a short distance away from contact therewith. It derives its rotary feeding movement from the platen cylinder by means of anintermediate roll, 9, which is lodged between the platen cylinder and said feed-roll so as to lie in contact with both, and is held yieldingly in such contact by having its bearings, 10, 1.0, held by springs, 11, 11, extending downward in direction to draw said intermediate roll, 9, toward both the platen roll, 3, and the feed-roll, 7. Said springs are attached at their lower ends to studs, 12, 12, on the standards. The feedroll, 7, has a rubber covering, 7, over its entire length and the intermediate roll, 9, has rubber covering, 9, for a short distance at each end, such short rubber covering all'ording the immediate bearing surface for contact with the platen cylinder on one hand and the feed-roll cylinder on the other hand. The upper surface of the intermediate roll, 9, is slightly lower only on the upper surface of the feed-roll, and is so near to the latter that the paper passing between the two feed-rolls lodges upon the upper side of the intermediate roll on its way to the platen cylinder, and said intermediateroll this serves to dispense with any other support for the paper intermediate the feed-rolls and the platen cylinder, A rubber covered roller, 13, jo'iirnalcd in the end standards rolls in contact with the platen cylinder at a point on the latter substantially at the level of the upper surface of the lower feed-roll so that the paper passing from said fecd-roll over the intermediate roll, 9, strikes the platen cylinder substantially at the point of contact between the latter and the roll, 13, and said roll, 13, thus serves to hold the paper onto the platen cylinder and causcit to be fed forward by the latter under the perforating or impressing disks. The intermediate roll, 9, has a multiplicity of annu lar grooves, 9 which receive the teeth or fingers, 14, of a paper stop bar, 14. This .the bearings of its trunnion in the end standpaper stop bar is formed of angle-iron for rigidity, and is rigidly mounted at its ends on bellcrank-lever fittings, 15 and 16, which have projecting parallel with the bar at their angles the trunnions or arbors, 15, 16 which are journaled in the end standards, 1, 1, respectively, whereby the stop-bar is fulcrumed at said bearings for rocking movement, in which it is carried up and down at the horizontally extending arms of the bellcrank levers. The arbor or trunnion, 15 of the bell-crank-lever fitting, 15, is long enough to extend out through the bearing of said trunnion in the standard, 1, and outside of the latter there is secured to it an operating lever arm, 17, which extends downward, and at its lower endcarries an abutment, preferably a stud and roll, 18, for co-operating with a cam, 27-28, on the shaft of the platen cylinder, as hereinafter described, by which the paper stop bar is rocked up and down about ards. The upper feed-roll, 8, is journaled in the forward ends of the horizontal arms of bell-crank-levers, 19, 19, which are fulcrumed at their angles on the end standards, 1, and

have downwardly extending arms, 19*, which are connected by links, 20, with the downwardly extending arms, 15', 16 of the bell-crank-lever fittings, 15, 16, which carry the paper stop bar. Said paper stop bar then constitutes the rigid connection across the machine for transmitting from the operating end at which the cam, 4011, is mount ed on the platen roll shaft to the opposite side, the movement which must be communicated at both ends to the upper feed-roll, 8, for oscillating it toward and from the lower feed-roll, 7; and it will be noticed that the connections are such that the said upper feed-roll is lifted and thereby the feed of the paper is interrupted by the same movement which causes the paper stop bar to be depressed bringing its fingers into the grooves of the intermediate roll, 9. At this stage the paper is designed to be advanced by the operator fromthe feeding table, 21, between the two feed-rolls, its forward edge being stopped by the paper stop bar and lodged upon the upper side of the intermediate roll, 9.

Upon the proper action of the cam lifting the stop-bar and depressing the upper feedroll the paper will be grasped between the 1 two feed-rolls and advanced onto the platen l cylinder under the perforating or impressing disk, and carried forward past the latter. The perforating or impressing disks are of the character described in my Patent No. 714,667, dated December 2, 1902, being toothed disks, having the ends of the teeth blunt or flat-faced, but very narrow, so that they tend, as described in my said former patent, merely to break or mutilate the fiber of the paper at the point at which it is pressed between said teeth and the platen cylinder. The effect of this action tends, of course, to break the fiber by indenting it on the upper side, with a tendency to protrude it on the lower side next to the platen, the effect being very similar to that produced by folding or creasing down a piece of paper, the inner side of the crease corresponding to the upper side, and the outer side to the lower side of the paper as it lies on the platen Wheel of the impressing disks. N otwithstanding the platen cylinder is hard so that it is not indented by the perforating disks, nevertheless the impressing action tends to slightly protrude the paper on the under side, so that a pile of sheets thus perforated, accumulated with their impressed lines registering one above the other, will be noticeably thicker at the line of the impressions than elsewhere. When sheets thus perforated are bound into books, as is the more usual and preferred mode of using them, the extra thickness at the lines of the perforations is objectionable, and it is important to prevent this result. Furthermore, to increase the facility of severing the paper by the usual method of tearing at the perforated or impressed lines, the breaking down of the fiber by the impression is desirably rendered more complete than it is by the mere action of the impressing disks, as a crease caused by folding the paper one way may be made more effective for facilitating the tearing of the paper by being broken down in the opposite direction. This result of breaking down the crease or impression is produced in this machine by the curvature of the paper on the platen beyond the impressing disks. The principle in accord.-

.ance with which such curvature produces the result stated. may be understood by folding and creasing down the fold of a pieceof paper and then having spread it flat, Wrapping it around and drawing it over a convex surface, with the outer side of the fold or crease against said surface or even by curving it in the direction in which it would be curved by being folded over a convex surface with the outer side of the crease toward such surface. It will be seen that such a process buckles back the crease in the opposite direction from that in which it was impressed, and so breaks the fiber both ways.

This result is rendered more certain and complete by providing a roller beyond the perforating disks for holding the paper firmly on the platen cylinder. F or this purpose I provide a roll or disk, 59, which is carried by each perforating disk the perforating disk beyond the same in the direction of advance of the paper, being mounted on said carriage so as to be pressed yieldingly against the paper whenever the disk is in operative impressing position, and for a short distance of travel of the paper after the disk is lifted therefrom, as more carriage in line with particularly l'iereinafter explained in connection with description of the impressing disk carriage and operating devices.

For operating the impressing disk carriage to lift and depress the disks, they are mounted, stated, upon a rock-shaft, 6, journaled in the standard, 1, said rock-shaft having at one end a lever-arm, 6, which extends downward and carries at its lower end an alnitment, preferably a stud-and-roll, 6 which is held by a spring against a cam, 40 -41, on the platen roll shaft. This arm, 6*, and the lever-arm, 17, of the paper stop bar, both requiring to be held yieldingly toward the platen roll shaft for co-operation with their respective operating roll cams, such yielding pressure is conveniently provided for both lever arms by connecting them together by a spring, 26, as shown. The two disks, 27, 28, for controlling the feed-roll and paper stop bar cam are of identical outline, having the concentric portion of their periphery of such extent as to hold the feed roller in action for any determined minimum length of feed, and being adj usted relatively to each other away from coincident position, they operate to extend the period of feed beyond such minimum. In such ease that is, when adjusted away "from minimum position,one of the disks controls the point of commencement of feeding action, while the other disk controls the point of termination of the feeding action. F or the purpose of guiding in the adjustment of these two disks for any desired length of feed in excess of the minimum, a dial-plate, 29, is mounted non-rotatably on a shaft adjacent to the outer of the two disks, 27 and 28, the inner disk, 27, being preferably fixed with respect to the shaft and being the one which controls the point of commencement of the feed. On the periphery of the dialplate there is a graduated scale corresponding to inches of the circumference of the platen cylinden that is to say, to inches of feed movement-,-and an index, 27, on the adjustable cam disk registers with the initial point of the scale when the two disks are coincident, said initial point being marked with the number of inches of minimum feed, whicl, as snown in the drawings, is 19, so that as the cam disk is adjusted for excess feed, the scale-reading opposite the index denotes the total number of inches of feed.

The two cam disks, .0 and 41, which control the impressing or perforating disks are both. mounted rotatably on the shalt, and being of identical outline have their concentric portion of the angular extent necessary for holding the perforating disks in contact with the platen cylinder for the determined minimum distance of length of feed, the cutaway portion throughout the remainder of the circumference of the disks corresponding to the minimum interval or interruption of perforation provided for .in each rotation of the platen cylinder. As in the case of the feed-controlling cam disks, one of these cut tor-controlling.disks, 40, controls the point of commencement of the perforating action, while the other, 41, (,aontrols the point of termination of such action. The position of these disks might be read. by the same dial, but for convenience, in order that the index mark or pointer upon each may be immediately adjacent to the dial from which the reading is to be taken, there is preferably provided a scale, 29, on the face of the dialplate, 29, whose periphery has the scale for reading feed length, and an index point extends from the inner side of the inner cam plate, 40, for reading this scale; and outside of the outer cam disk, 4], there is mounted non-rotatably on the shaft a second dialplate, 30, whose scale (30) readings are radially coincident with the corresponding readings of the other scale, 29*, and this scale, 30, is read by an index mark, 4]., on the outer face of the outer cam disk, 4H The outer cam disk is the one which controls the point of lifting of the perforating disk, or interruption of the perforation, that is, the point at which the disk comes off the platen wheel; and the index mark on this outer cam disk being set, for example, at No. of the outer scale, the perforating disk will be lifted from the platen at a distance of five inches from the edge of the paper. The inner cam disk, 40, controls the point at which the perforating disks come onto the platen and coinmence perforating; and when the index linger of this inner cam disk is set, for example, at of the inner scale, the perforation that was interrupted at five inches from the edge will re-connnence at 15 inches from the edge. The dial plates and all the cam disks except the inner one being loose on the shaft for longitudinal movement, are adapted 'to be clamped together and held rigidly with the shaft by means of any pressure applied outside the outer dial plate; and this plate is for that purpose most ctmveniently made as a cap for the end of the shaft, the socket of the cap having sufficient depth to allow the necessary longitudinal movement for clamping the plates together; and a clamping screw is set through an aperture at the center of the cap which takes into the cap, the shoulder of the screw binding upon the cap for clamping.

The carriage for each of the impressing or perforating disks consists of a collar, 50, having a lug, 5], and split radially through the lug for clamping onto the rock-shaft, 6. The collar is also split transvmsely to the axis, rendering it forked to receive between the annular forked disks, 50, the disk-carrying arm, 5+1, which is forked at the end to receive the disk, 5, and has its stem ba ck of the forked arms in which the disk is journaled, entered between the forked disks, 50 of the carriage at the upper side across the radial split of the carriage, and pivoted to the carriage behind the shaft. In the forward member of the split lug, 51, there is lodged a spring, 53, which protrudes from the lug and bears at its lower end upon a shoulder, 54 of the disk-carrying lever arm, 54:, a screw, 55, being set through the lug from the upper side to adjust the tension of the spring. On the shaft between the forked disks, 50 there is lodged a collar, 56, which has at its forward side a lug, 56, on which the disk-carrying lever arm, 54, is stopped. This collar, 56, might be rigid with the carriage and shaft, but in view of another element which is mounted in the carriage it is preferably loose thereon, as stated, said other element being a lever arm, 57, pivoted to the carriage between the forked disks at the lower side, preferably directly under the shaft at 58*, and carrying in its forward end, which is forked for the purpose, the smoothing or ironing disk, 59. The lug, 56, which stops the disk carrying lever, 54, on its upper side, serves also as a stop at its lower side for a spring, 60, interposed between said lug and the upper side of the lever, 57, being retained on a stud, 57 set into the lever and reacting to hold the ironing disk down onto the platen cylinder, the action of the spring in this respect being limited by a tail, 56, on the collar, 56, against which the rear end or tail, 57 on the lever, 57 stops. The parts are so proportioned and the springs are of such relative tension that when the shaft is rocked in direction to lift the perforating disk from the platen the ironing disk remains in contact with the platen for a sufficient time after the perforating disk is out of contact with it, to permit the last perforation made by the disk before it lifts the platen to pass under the ironing disk before the latter leaves the platen.

After passing the ironing or crease-reversing rolls, the paper lying upon the platen cylinder passes under the deflecting wheels or disks, 61, 61, which are mounted for adj ustment longitudinally on a shaft, 62, which is itself lodged in bearings, 1 on the end standards, the deflecting wheels or disks, 61, being peripherally in contact with the platen cylinder and deriving rotary motion solely therefrom. Below deflecting disk, 61, there is mounted on the end standards a smaller roller, 63, in contact at its upper side with the lower side of the deflecting disks so as to be rotated by the latter. On a shaft, 64, supported in the standard, extending from side to side of the machine in the interval between the platen cylinder and the roll, 63, there are mounted and adjustable longitudinally on said shaft, devices which I have named curlers, being concavely curved guides for curling up the lateral edges of the paper sheet as it emerges from between the platen cylinder and the disk, 61. These curlers, 65, 65, are practically straight,or have but slight curvature,at the end toward the platen cylinder, said end being preferably acute and bearing on the cylinder to strip the paper therefrom, but commence immediately to curl up at the outer side, the curvature of the two curlers being about axes which converge onward from the platen cylinder so that asithe edges of the paper pass onto and'advance over the curlers they are coiled or rolled up or dished. The effect of this curling up of the paper at the sides,

and the purpose for which they are provided, 1

is to stiffen the sheet so that it will not hang down as it would naturally tend to do in the absence of any such provision; and when thus curled up at the sides in its delivery from between the disks, 61, and the roll, 63, the sheet is easily projected horizontally for a considerable distance before the weight of the overhanging end will cause it to drop or hang downward. Since these curlers support the paper only at the lateral edges, there are required for sheets of any considerable width intermediate supports to prevent the paper sagging in the middle; and for that purpose, there are mounted adjustably on the shaft, 64, which carries the curlers, and between the latter, fingers, 66, which project toward the platen cylinder in the plane of the proximate (inner) edges of the curlers. These fingers may be adjusted so as to divide the space between the curlers into three parts and cause it to be projected for delivery on the receiving table as desired. On the delivery table, 70, mounted at the delivery side of the machine there are provided adjustable lateral guides, 71, 71, and. an adjustable end stop or guide, 72; and between these three guides, as in a three-sided box, the sheets are to be delivered in a uniform even-edged pile. Such delivery would be defeated, measurably, or entirely prevented, if the sheets tended to drop downward immediately after passing the last feeding devices of the machine, because their forward edges would often in that case be folded or curled under, and the sheets would be merely rolled instead of advanced definitely to the limit of the box, but being curved or dished, as described, by the curlers, and thus held stiff, each sheet, as it is fed outward from the ma chine is projected between the side guards, 71, 71, without contact with them, because the edges of the paper are curled up, and when the table is adjusted at suitable slope, the ejecting movement which the paper receives will cause it, after entering thus without contact with the side guards between them, to advance until it strikes the end guard, 72, and being then entirely free from the feeding devices of the machine and from the curlers, it will flatten out, filling the width of the box or space between the side guards, all three guarded edges being thus brought precisely to the proper lines corresponding to the full dimensions of the sheet, and all the sheets thus delivered to the machine up to the height of a pile which can be properly guarded between the guards will be thus accumulated in an even-edged pile without the necessity for any such expedient as joggling the bed or tapping the edges, which is usually necessary to accomplish such result.

\Vhen the forward edge of a sheet is advanced against a stop bar or plate which pre sents an unbroken wall in the path of the advancing edge of the sheet, the air under the sheet being confined somewhat between the sheet and such wall acts as a cushion and tends touphold the edge of the sheet and cause it to roll or curve upward and slide up on the air cushion, and this will happen to such an extent that a sheet under such circumstances will be deflected upward so as to pass over a stop wall three or four inches or even more in height. To avoid this defective action, the end stop, 72, is not made as a flat wall, but the bar of which it is formed is bent at right angles at the ends to protrude toward the advancing edge of the sheet two narrow-edged lugs, 72 and the paper is stopped. against this projection and not against the unbroken face of the bar; so that there is no confined air to form a cushion between the sheet and the stop bar.

I claim 1. In a paper perforating machine, in combination with the rotating platen roll, feed rolls for delivering the paper thereto and an intermediate roll for supporting the paper in its passage from the delivery side of the feed rolls on to the platen rolls.

2. In a paper perforating machine, in

' combination with platen roll and means for rotating it, feed rolls for delivering the paper thereto and an intermediate roll driven frictionally by the platen roll and frictionally driving the lower feed roll.

3. In a paper-perforating machine, in combination with the platen roll and means for rotating it, a roll mounted for frictional contact at its end portions only with the platen roll, and lower feed rolls for delivering the paper to the platen roll in frictional contact with said end portions only of said intermediate roll.

4. In a paper-perforating machine, in combination with the platen roll, a lower feed roll for d elivcring the paper there to, and a roll for transmitting rotation from the platen roll to the feed roll lodged between the two in frictional contact with both, and springs pressing it yieldingly into said interval.

In a paper-perforating machine, in combination with a platen roll and means for rotating it, a lower feed roll for delivering the paper to the platen roll; an intermediate roll of greater diameter than the short est distance between the platen roll and said feed roll lodged between said two rolls above their point of nearest approach; springs attached to the frame and bearings for said intermediate roll connected to the ends of the springs respectively for pressing said intermediate roll toward the other two rolls.

6. In a paper-perforating machine in combination with a platen roll and means for rotating it, a lower platen roll for delivering the paper thereto; an intermediate roll of greater diameter than the shortest distance between the platen roll and said feed roll lodged at its end portions upon both said rolls above the point of their nearest ap proach; sprin -pressed bearings for said intermediate roIl, said roll being reduced in diameter between said end portions and annularly grooved; a paper stop bar mounted for movement toward and from said grooved roll having lingers taking into the grooves of the latter, and means for lifting and, depressing said bar.

7. In a paper-perforating machine, in combination with a platen roll and means for rotating it, a pair of feed rolls for delivering the paper to the platen roll; means for driving the lower of said feed rolls by connection with the platen roll; means for raising and lowering the upper feed roll to intermit the feed; an annularly grooved roller intermediate the lower feed roll and the platen roll adapted to support the paper in passing from the former to the latter; a paper stop bar mounted for movement toward and from said grooved roll, having fingers adapted to enter the grooves of the latter at the depressed position of the bar; means for raising and lowering said feed bar, and connections between said means and the means for raising and lowering the upper feed roll for causing said roll and said bar to have reverse movement.

8. In a paperperforating machine, in combination with a rotating platen, a lower feed-roll and means for rotating it; an upper feed roll and bearings for the same movable toward and from. the lower roll; a paper stop bar mounted for up-aml-dmvn movement in the interval between the feed rolls on the one hand and the platen roll on the other hand; connections between the upper feed roll bearings and said stop bar for causing them. to move oppositely; a cam rotating with the platen roll and means operated thereby for giving said upper feed roll and the stop bar such opposite movement.

9. In a perforating machine, in combination with a platen roll, means for feeding the retracting them from the platen. cylinder; cams for controlling the feeding devices and the impressing disks, said cams consisting of. disks mounted on the platen roll shaft, the feed-controlling cam having the disk which controls the commencement of the feeding action fixed with respect to the shaft, t'wo disks of the cam for controlling the perforating disks being adjustable about the shaft; a graduated disk or dial plate non-rotatable on l the shaft adjacent to said two cam disks respectively, and means on said cam disks for j reading their position 011 the respectively adj acent graduated disks.

10. In a machine for the purpose indicated, in combination with a platen roll, means for feeding the paper thereto; a cam. for controlling said paper-feeding means j mounted on the platen roll shaft and having the part thereof which controls the com I mencement of the feed fixed with respect to the shaft; perforating or impressing rolls mounted for movement toward and from the prising a cam consisting of two disks mounted on the platen roll shaft adjustable thereabout for controlling respectively the lifting and depressing of the perforating disks each having an index; two disks mounted non-rotatably on the shaft adjacent to said cam disks respectively each having a graduated scale for indicating the position of the cam platen roll; means for operating them comdisks respectively, the zero point of the said scales being related to the feed-controlling cam so as to correspond to the point at which the forward edge of the paper reaches the perforating disk.

11. In a machine for the purpose indi cated, in combination with a platen cylinder, means of feeding the paper thereto comprising a cam on the platen roll shaft; perforating disks mounted for movement toward and from the platen roll; means for so operating said perforating disks compr sing a cam consisting of two disks for controlling respectively the movementof the perforating disks toward and away from the platen cylinder, said disks being adjacent to each other on the shaft and adjustable thereabout; dial j plates on the shaft fixed relatively to the I point of the feed-controlling cam which con- I trols the commencement of the feeding movement, said dial plates being adjacent to the two cam disks respectively, and means for clamping all said cam disks and dial plates rigidly together and holding them fixed to the shaft.

12. In a machine for the purpose indicated, in combination with the platen cylinder, a perforating or impressing disk co-operating therewith to impress the paper; a roll bearing upon the platen cylinder beyond the j disk, and curlers mounted below the line of i sheet, concave upwardly and toward each other oblique to l the sheet, and l E means for receiving the paper'located beyond and lower than said curlers.

13. In a machine for the purpose indi- I cated, in combination with a platen cylinder,

the perforating or impressing disk co-operating therewith; a deflecting roller bearing upon the cylinder beyond the perforating disks; curlers mounted for lateral adjustment below the path of delivery of the paper from the under side of said roll; a receiving table mounted beyond and lower than the curlers, and adapted to be set inclined downward away from the curlers; lateral gages and an end gage or paper stop mounted adjustably on such table.

14. In a machine for the purpose indicatec in combination with a platen cylinder, a perforating or impressing disk; a carriage in which the same is mounted; a rock-shaft parallel with the axis of the cylinder on which said carriage is mounted; means for rocking the shaft to lift and lower the disk, the means for mounting riage comprising a lever in which the disk is journaled pivoted to the carriage; a spring reacting between the carriage and said lever for yieldingly holding the disk-carrying end of the latter toward the cylinder; a second the disk in the carlever pivoted to the carriage at the side of the rock-shaft toward the cylinder; a roll mounted in the free end of said last mentioned lever adapted to bear on the cylinder beyond the delivery side of the perforating disk, and a spring reacting on said lever arm to hold. the roll yieldingly against the cylinder.

15. In a machine for thepurpose indicated, in combination with a platen cylinder, a rock shaft mounted parallel to the axis thereof; means for rocking the shaft; a carriage mounted on the rock shaft for rocking therewith; a lever pivoted to the carriage and extending from its pivot past the shaft toward the platen cylinder; a perforating disk mounted on the free end of the lever a spring reacting between the lever and the carriage to press the disk upon the platen cylinder; a collar on the shaft; a second lever pivoted to the carriage on the side of the shaft toward the cylinder; a pressure roll mounted on the free end of the last mentioned lever for bearing on the cylinder in the path of the perforating disk; a stop on the collar encountered by the disk-carrying lever in opposition to the action of its spring; a spring reacting between the second lever and the collar for holding the latter onto the cylinder, and a second stop on the collar for limiting the action of such spring.

16. In a machine for the purpose indicated, in combination with a platen cylinder, a rock shaft mounted parallel to the axis for rocking it; a carriage mounted on the rock shaft consisting of a collar or disk which is split radially and bolts for clamping it to the shaft, said collar being also forked .or split transversely to the shaft; a disk-carrying lever pivoted in the trans verse fork, and a perforating disk mounted in its free end; a spring reacting against the lever to hold the disk toward the platen cyli inder; a collar on the shaft within the transverse fork of the carriage having a stop for the disk-carrying lever; a second lever pivoted in said fork outside of the shaft toward the cylinder; a pressure roll mounted in the free end of such lover; a spring reacting between said lever and collar for holding the pressure roll onto the cylinder, the collar having a stop for the second lever at the opposite side of the fulcrum of the latter from the pressure roll.

17. In a machine for the purpose indi cated, in combination with the platen cylinder and means co-eperating therewith for perforating the paper, means for deflecting the paper from the cylinder and edge curlers mounted beyond the deflecting device in position for receiving the lateral edges of the paper, and means beyond the curlers for receiving the sheets delivered therefrom.

18. In a machine for the purpose indicated, in combination with a platen on which the paper is supported during perforation and means re-operating therewith for perforating the paper; means for advancing the paper from the supporting platen; a support for the paper on to which it is advanced com prising curlers in position to be encountered by the lateral edges of the paper in its ad- I Vance, and a receptacle for the paper beyond such support.

19. In a machine for the purpose indicated, in combination with a platen on which the paper is supported during perforation, means co-operating therewith for perforating the paper; means for advancing the paper oil from the platen; a transverse bar and curlers mounted adjustably thereon in position to be encountered by the lateral edges of the paper as it is advanced off the platen, and intermediate paper-supporting fingers also adjustable longitudinally on the bar.

20. In a machine for the purpose indicated, in combination with means for perforating the paper and advancing it from the perforating devices, a receptacle for the paper having a stop for the forward edge of the paper in the path of advance into the recep-- tacle, said stop comprising a bar and relatively narrow edge projections protruding therefrom toward the advancing edge of the paper.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at Chicago, Illinois, this 29th day of January, 1906.

CORTLAND CARLTON. WVitnesses J. S. ABBOTT, M. GERTRUDE Am:

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2621741 *Dec 9, 1949Dec 16, 1952Gideon KaneWeb perforating mechanism
US2635695 *Jun 9, 1947Apr 21, 1953W O Hickok Mfg CoSheet feeding mechanism
US3122040 *Dec 7, 1959Feb 25, 1964Bishop Lewis HMachine for perforating, scoring and slicing with feed means
US3149595 *Dec 27, 1961Sep 22, 1964Rand Mcnally & CoThread chain severing means for book sewing machines
US3224367 *Nov 5, 1962Dec 21, 1965Harris Intertype CorpMarking mechanism for use with sheet material
US3347123 *Jun 21, 1965Oct 17, 1967Printing Service CompanyPerforator
US3774485 *Jun 15, 1971Nov 27, 1973Xerox CorpMethod and apparatus for quick changing article addressing machines from one size label form to another
US4168643 *Nov 9, 1977Sep 25, 1979Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Web slitter with presser roll
US4411195 *Jan 12, 1982Oct 25, 1983Multidick Inc.Printing press within tear-line tracing means
US7028598 *Dec 27, 2002Apr 18, 2006Kabushiki Kaisha Tokyo Kikai SeisakushoApparatus for longitudinally perforating a web of paper in a rotary printing press
US20030177918 *Dec 27, 2002Sep 25, 2003Tsunetoshi TeshimaApparatus for longitudinally perforating a web of paper in a rotary printing press
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB26D3/08