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Publication numberUS856216 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1907
Filing dateFeb 15, 1907
Priority dateFeb 15, 1907
Publication numberUS 856216 A, US 856216A, US-A-856216, US856216 A, US856216A
InventorsDavid G Black
Original AssigneeDavid G Black
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus.
US 856216 A
Images(8)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 856,216' 7 APA TENTED JUNE 1 1 1907.

D. G. BLACK.

GAME APPARATUS. APPLICATION FILED FEB. 15, 1907 a sums-sum 1.

WITNESSES; NVENTOR \s mwzazzzmz ATTORNEY Q 7 I I If I N0. 856,216. PATENTED JUNE 11, 1907.

D. G. BLACK.

A GAME APPARATUS.

APPLIOATIQN FILED PBB.15, 1907.

B SHEETS-SHEET 2.

7 INVENTORI l ATTORN EY PATENTED JUNE 11, 1907.

D. G. BLACK. GAME APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED PEB.15, 1907.

8 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

VENTOR Black N0.856,216. PATENTED JUNE 11, 1907.

D. G. BLACK. GAME APPARATUS.

APPLIUATION FILED rnn.'15,1907.' a SHEETS-SHEET 4.

INVENTOR flaww fllac/a WITNESSES:

No. 856,216. I. PA-TENTED JUNE 11,1907. D. G. BLACK.

GAME APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 15,1907.

8 SHEETS-SHEET 5 wnmssss: Q INVENTOR WM% J] JayaZGfilaefa 7 BY a gZM/%W4 flown PATENIED JUNE 11, 19 07.

1). e; BLAOKA GAME APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 15, 1907.

8 SHEETS-SHEET 6,

. INVENTOR fiawififilat/a BY I ATTORNEY PATENTED-JUNE 11, 1907.

D. G. BLACK.

GAME APPARATUS. APPLIOATION FILED FEB. 15, 1907.

8 SHEETS-SHEET 7.

. INVENTOR flair/id 6%5ZZZ0Z2 ATTORNEY PATENTED JUNE 11, 1907.,

D. G. BLAGK. GAME APPARATUS.

APPLICATION rum) FEB.15, 1907.

8 SHEETSSHEET 8.

. A 1 r A Q JUHHHQ 4 w 4 p 5 j 1 m =1 LA A a M w, M F :1 HE 3 m W w w m a F II. II. 1 WI INVENTOR ATTORNEY UNITED ST S PATENT orrron.

DAVID c. LAoK, on BROOKLYN, New YORK.

GAME APPARATUS.

$pecification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 11, 1 907.

Application filed February 15, 1907. Serial No. 357,475- I pointed out in the claims.

- which the balls ma ism will be connected in a series of electric circuits, normally broken, one. of which will A be closed by the ball each timeit passes through or over the target, by said ball fall- The object of the invention is to provide a novel, suitable, attractive and efficient apparatus with the use of which a game representative of a game of base-ball may be played, the players batting the ball and the runs on the diamond being performed by buttons 'or figures representing the players and traveling one or more bases 01': making home-runs in accordance with the location to be driven when batted.

The apparatus 0 my invention comprises generally (1) means for projecting or tossing a base-ball upwardly in position for it to be struck by a bat in the hands of a player, (2) a target through or over which the player will seek to drive the ball, (3) an indicator bearing a representation of a diamond field with the mechanism hereinafter described, for causing buttons or figures to travel from base to base on said diamond in accordance with the game-value of the batted balls, and (4) electrical means to be rendered active by the batted balls for controlling the operation of the indicator mechanism and the runs to be made b the representative players.

I pre erably provide as a part of the a paratus a chamber at the front of which W1 1 be the batters position and at the rear end of which will be arranged thetargetat or at an open space above which the players will seek, to drive the. ball, and the floor and sides of said chamber will preferably be painted to represent in an illusionary manner a baseball field of somewhat natural proportions.

The indicator and its inclosed mechanism will preferably be located near the front of the target-chamber where it may be convenfl iently observed, and said indicator ID60118117- ing upon and depressin a contact located at and its mechanism, 'the means for electrically controlling. the operation ofsaid mechfrom the detailed description hereinafter or merely strike the walls of the target-.cham- 6 ber, to a suitablereceiver at the batters position.

The novel features of m invention reside more particularly in the iamond-indicator anism and enabling the batted ball in accordance with its game-value to establish the appropriate circuit for permitting said mechanism to operate, and the means for returningthe batted balls to the batters position in front of the target-chamber.

The invention will be fully understood presented, reference being ad to the accompanying drawings, in Which:

Figure 1 is a front elevation, partly in perspective and partly broken away, of a .gameapparatus embodying my invention, this figure mainly representing the target-chamber denoting in an illusionary manner. a'base ball field, and the means for returning the batted balls to and receiving. themat the batters position in front of said chamber; Fig. 2 is a central vertical longitudinal section of the same-on the dotted line 2-2 of Fig. 1 Fig. 3 is a detached side'elevation of the upper portion of one of thepoststo which the dottedline 5 5 of Fig. 6; Fig; 6' is a,

transverse section through a portion of the rear-part of the chamber and its cooperating parts on the dotted line 66 of Fig. ,5 Fig. 7 is an enlarged detached face view of a ortion v.of the target disposed. at the rear en of the chamber; Fig. 8 is an enlarged longitudinal section, corresponding substantially with Fig. 2, illustrating the apparatus for tossing the ball upwardly preparatory to the batting 1 1,0 of the same, the section being on the dotted 'the rear end of said 0 amber. There arel line8'8 of Flg. 9; Fig.3 is an enlarged top view, partly broken away, of the flooring in front of the chamber and illustrates the return runway for the base balls and the means for tossing them upwardly preparatory to their being batted; Fig. is a face View of the mechanism by means of which the figures on. the indicator diamond, denoting the scores made by the batters, are caused to travel from base to base, the outside casing and the diamond indicator plate represented in Figs. .1 and 2 being omitted from Fig. 10; Fig. 11 is a side elevation, partly in section, of same, the casing ofthe indicator with its diamond indicator plate representing bases being shown in position and partly in section; Fig. 12 is a vertical section on the dotted line 12'12 of Fig. 13 of the ratchet mechanism illustrated by the upper right hand portion of Fig. 11; Fig. 13 is a vertical. transverse section of the same on the dotted line 13-13 of Fig. 12; Fig. 14 is an enlarged detached front view of the lower portion of the indicatordiamond, with the buttons or travelers rep resenting the players ready for use in playing the game, the top button or traveler being shown as being in the batters position; Fig. I 15 is an enlarged vertical section throughthe lock-mechanism for directly controlling the rotation of the dies by which the buttons or travelers are caused to move along the indicator-diamond; Fig. 16 is an enlarged 'cen tral vertical section through a portion of the large disk which effects the travel of the buttons along the indicator-diamond, with its axle and cooperating parts; Fig.1? is a like section through the lower oropera'ting shaft of the interior mechanism for the indicatordiamond; Fig. 18 1s a diagrammatic view illustrating the electric circuits by which in connection with the mechanism shown in Fig. 1.0, the travel of the buttons around the indicator-diamond is effected and controlled, and Fig. 19 is a side elevation of one of the buttons or travelers which on the indicator represent the players.

' In the drawings, 30 designates the chantiber into which the balls are to be batted and at the rear end of which is located the target 31 composed of strips ofwoven fabric, such as is commonly usedfor belting. The chamber 30 is formed by a frame-work of any suit able character having a top 32, sides 33, a rear end 34, a base flooring 35 and an upper flooring composed of sections 36, 37 which incline frontwardly and downwardly and are separated at their adjoiningends by a space 38 (Fig. 2) extending transversely ac oss the chamber 30 and through which a be falling upon the rear floor section 36 may pass and be thence directed frontwardly to the receiver for balls to be batted. The floor-sec tions 36, 37 and a'portion of the vertical surfaces of the target 31 and sides 33 are painted to represent in an illusionary manner a base ball field surrounded by a fence, with scenery beyond the upper edge of the fence,insoine what naturalproportions, as shown in Figs. 1,

2 and 5. Thetarget- 31 does not extend upwardly to the roof of the chamber 30, and upon the face of the rear end 34'of'said chamber where itprojects above the plane of said target is painted scenery te add to the illusionary effect presented by the chamberf The walls of the chamber 30 converge rearwardly as-indicated in Figs. 1 and 2, which aids in imparting to the chamber the effect of considerable depth.

The target 31, composed of strips of fabric in edge to edge relation to one another, is secured at its ends to posts 39, 40, one ofwhich is mounted to be rotated by means of a key to be applied to its upper polygonal end 41 (Figs. 2, 3 and 4). The upper end of the post 40 is held within a suitable bearing 42 upon which is secured. a spring-pawl 43 adapted to engage a ratchet wheel 44 secured upon the post 40. 1 Thepost 40 will be rotated to wind one end of the target 31 upon it when it is desired to increase the tension of the target or remove slackness from it, and the pawl 43 and ratchet 44 serve to lock the post 40.

extent when struck by a ball and this facilitates the passage of the ball between them. Between the target'31 and rear end 34 of the chamber are arranged three'chutes, of

hopper shape, designated 45, 46 and 47 re spectively, and outwardly beyond the chute 47 is formed a chute 48,'the end 34 constituting the outer wall of this chute 48. The upper portions of the chutes. 45, 46 and 47 incline forwardly to the rear surface of the target 31 and eXtendfr-om one end to the other of. said target, and the mouths of said'chutes 45, 46, 47 are disposed one above the other so as to define definite fields of. the target 31, the chute 45 defining a section of the target 31 representative of first base and adapted to receive a ball passing between the strips of thetarget within the outline of the open mouth of said chute 45, the game value of the ball passing into the chute 45 entitling the player to a first base run.. The mouth of the chute 46 is against a middle section of the target 31 and is adapted to receive a ball passing through the said. section, that is between the strips thereof, and a ball driven into the chute 46 would entitle the batter to a run to second base. The mouth of the ently disposed so that the batters may exercise skill in drivingthe ball to locations of the highest game value. A ball driven into the chamber and not passing either through or over the target 31 would be regarded as a foul, and such ball if falling upon the rear floor section 36 would roll down the same and through the space 38 andfinally reach the receiver 49 at the front of the chambenwhile if such ball should fall upon the front section 37 of the flooring it would roll 'down the same and fall upon the frontwardlyextend ing portion of the main flooring. 35,

discharge spouts, as shown in Fig.6, leading downwardly to a series of troughs 50, 51, 52, 53 respectively, (Figs.,1 and 6), whichincline downwardly andfrontwardly and lead into a general trough 54 at the? front oifflthe chamber 30 (Fig. 1) by which the halls-are guided tothe receiver-49 located at the batr ters position.- The troughs 50, 51,";521and 53 extend below the floor section's 36,37jand their bottom is formed by the main fioor'sec- 601135 (Figs. 2 and 5).

- -At the rear ends of the troughs 50,51,52 and 53 and just below the discharge spouts from the several chutes 45, 46, 47, 48 316 6.1:-

ran ed spring cont'acts 55, 56, 57, 58 respec-" tive ly upon which the balls passing into the chutes will descend and close the circuitsconnected with said contacts before they roll down the said troughs to the front ofxthe chamber. The spring contacts 55, 56, 57, 58 are in the nature or small spring plates 10- cat-ed directly above plates or posts'59, 60,

- I 61 62 from which wires 63, 64, 65, 66 respec- 4s tively, pass and coperate withother wires in forming. electric circuits leading to the casing 67 of the diamond-indicator 68, here inafter described. When a ball falls upon one of the contacts 55, 56, 57 58 it will d'e press the same against a post or plate 59, 60, 61 or 62, as the case may be, and close ,a circuit extending therefrom in the manner hereinaiter described and .as more clearly illustratedin Fig; 18, whereby the mechanism within the-casing 67- willbe allowed-to operate to an extent governed by the game-value of the ball which closes the circuit at the rear end of the chamber 30] The arrangement of l the electric circuits will be described in detail hereinaiter, it being intended more particularly to describe at this place the me.

a chanical features of the apparatus. It. mav

. be said, however, that the hallsfallingdowfiwardly through the chutes 45, 46, 47 48 only remain momentarily upon the spring conthe rear and frontfloor sections 36, 37, and v 1 these balls, unless they roll directly into one of the troughs 50, 51, 52, 53, are, by means of converging strips of boarding 67, 68 (Fig. 1) 8o directed to the main receiving trough 54, the

strips 67, 68 converging frontwa'rdly and directing the ball into one of the troughs 50, 53, i

the loweredge of the strips 67,- 68 being on a The receiver 49' constitutes simply a transversely elongated receptacle at the 'batters position and Whose left hand end, looking at Fig.1, is open "at its bottom for a width a' little greater than the diameter ofja baseball, so that the ball rolling to theleft hand end of-said receiver may drop slightly and rest upon the fre'e 'end' of the bar-spring 69 (Fig. 8) secured upon a block 70, below the fl'ooring 35. At the front of therec'eiver 49 5 is mounted a shaft 71 provided at one end I an operating handle 72 and at its other ,1 end with a crank arm 73 which projects rear-f wardly below the flooring 35 and is equipped with a weighted pivoted arm 74 whose outer me endnormally projects rearwardlyupom the forward end ofthe spring 69. The purpose: of'the'spring 69, shaft 71, handle 72.and arrn. I

74 istoafford adequate means for tossing the i ball located upon the spring upwardly into 1'05- position to be struck by a bat in the hands oi a player at the batters position, so that said ball maybe driven into the chamber 30 to ward the target- 31.

wardly, an attendant will throw the handle.

72 rearwardly to the position indicated by dotted lines in Fig 8 and thereby cause the'-; crank arm 73 and pivotedarm 74 to flex the plane with the upper edge of said troughs. 851 v The chutes 45, 46,47,455 have separate When it' is desired to toss the ball resting upon thespring 6911p? o 1 spring69 downwardly, the movement of the 1 1 handle 72 continuing until they end of-the.

spring 69 slips from the endof'thearm 74, at which time the said spring" will quickly return to its upward position and eject the ball v upwardly tromthe receiver 49.. Upon the left hand ball being projected upwardly from the receiver 49 the next adjacent ball in; Y said receiver will roll into position uponsaid sprin and the attendant will restore the hand e 72 to its"no rmal position shown by full lines in Fig. 8, the toe of the arm 7 4 turning downwardly as the said arm passes the end of the sprin 69 and thereafter, due to the weighted cm of saidarm, turning upwardly so that it may pass-into the, position 1 0 l movement of the ball.

shown in Fig- 8 above said spring, preparatory lo the further operation of tossing a ball upwardly for the next player. The. spring 69, shaft 71, handle 72, crank arm 73 and weigh ted arm 7*}- constitute simply one convenient means for projecting the ball upwardly into position to be struck by the batter, and my invention is not confined to the special mechanism shown for accomplishing this purpose since various mechanisms may readily be devised for effecting the upward I do, however, regard it as important and novel with me, in an apparatus of the character described, to provide the series of troughs 50, 51, 52 and 53 leading into the maintrough 5 1 which conducts the return balls tothe receiver 49 adapted to automatically locate the ball to be used directly upon the means-by which the ball is to be projected upwardly. The shaft 7], looking at Fig. 1, should be extended to the right a suitable distance to enable the attendant to operate the handle 72 without danger of being struck by a bat in the hands of a player standing at the batters position adjacent to the receiver 49, and I therefore show the shaft 7 1 as being broken.

The mechanism controlled by the electric circuits and confined Within the upper portion of the casing 67 of the diamond-indicator 68 is illustrated more clearly in Figs. 10 to 15 inclusive. The front of the casing 67 is, however, illustrated in Fig. 2, wherein it may be seen that the lower portion of the casing is provided with a door which closes a compartment which may be used for holding the batteries for the electric cir cuits and the base balls when the latter are not in use. The upper portion of the casing 67 forms a chamber within which is confined the operating mechanism. shown in Figs. 10

. players, and which buttons or travelers are 50 caused to traverse the slot 77 from base to base and finally return to the home slot 78. In Fig. 14 I illustrate three of the travelers 79 in the home slot 78 and onetraveler, this being the one in play, ready to travel along theslot 77 toward first base. InFi 2 l illustrate the traveler 79 as being distri uted upon the bases, one traveler being on firstba'sc, one ,onsecond-base, one on third base and one at the home-base ready to move along the slot 77 upon a ball being driven through or over the target 31- and'completing one of the electric circuits permitting the mechanism. shown in Figs. 10, 11, to operate.

Directly in rear of the face-plate 76 of the diamonddndicritor is mounted a Wheel 80 which isutilized during its rotation as the means for compelling the buttons or travelers 79 to follow the angular course defined by the diamond slot 77. The wheel 80 is mounted upon an axle 81 (Fig. 16) and has keyed to it a pinion wheel 82 so thatmotion may be imparted through the wheel 82 to the wheel 86 while the axle 81 remains stationary. Upon the front end of the axle 81 is a disk 83, to which. is rigidly fastened that portion of the face-plate 76 which is bounded by the slot'7 7. The axle 81 is mounted in a rigid portion 84 of the framing for supporting the general operative mechanism and the details, of which are unimportant. Upon the periphery of the wheel 80 is provided the gear teeth 85 to engage, a pinion wheel 86 secured upon the frontend of a shaft 87 which is mounted in a sleeve 88 (Fig. 11) carried by the rear frame 84:. of the gear wheel 86 and shaft 87 will be hereinafter explained. The wheel 80 is provided primarily to effect the travel of the buttons 79 from base to base along the dia,

mond slot 77, and upon the front face of the wheel 80 are formed four segmental portions 89 at whose adjoining ends'are formed undercut slots 90 (Figs. 10 and 11) into which the buttons 79, at their inner ends, pass and back and forth along-which said buttons may move during the rotation of the wheel 80 carrying said buttons along the angular course of the diamond. slot 77. The buttons 79 formed, as shown in Fig. 19 with an outer head 91, an inner head 92 and a connecting neck 93, and during the period that a button is engaged by the wheel 80, the inner head 92 of the button is held freely within one.

The wheel 80 contains four of the undercut slots 90 and in the normal stationary condition of the mechanism these slots will be in line with the'bases orcorners of the diamond-slot 77 in the face-plate 76, and after each rotary movement of the wheel 80, whethera run of one or more bases is to be shown on the diamond-indicator 68, the wheel will come to a rest with its slots 90 in their normal position in line with the bases or corners of the diamond slot 77 The wheel 80 has four spokes 94 and these spokes are preferably in line with the slots 90 and have rearwardly extending webs or flanges 95 upon which are lugsv 96 to be engaged at the proper time, by a pivoted latch 97 (Fig. 15) for arresting the wheel 80 at a secured a spring dog 98 which operates to prevent any reverse movement of the wheel 80 after said wheel becomes arrestedby the latch 97, said dog 98 thus aiding in maintaining the wheel 80 when it comes to a stop with its slots 90 directly in line with the corners or bases of the diamond slot 77 and with the lower one-of said slots 90in direct alinement with the home slot 78 formed in the face plate 76 below said diamond-slot 77, so that the buttons or. travelers 79 located in said home-slot may, ,when pressed upwardly therefrom to the position in which the upper one of said buttons or travelers is shown in Fig. 14, enter the then lower undercut slot 90 and also have its neck portion carried into the slot 77 at the batters position. In Fig. 10 I illustrate one of the buttons or travelers 79 as having been moved upwardly into the lower slot '90 of the wheel 80, while the remaining buttons are below said slot. The dog 98 during the rotation of the wheel 80,

toward the left, ields to the spokes 94 of the wheel, each spo e turning the dog inwardly as it'passes over the same, and the spring connected with said dog restoring the same outwardl to its normal position immediately after each'spoke passes over it. The wheel 80 having the slots 90 is therefore utilized for effecting. the travel of the buttons .79.along the representative diamond field indicated by the slot 79 in the face-plate 76 of the diamond indicator 68, and said wheel 80 is given an intermittent controlled motion, making either. a part of a rotation'or an entire rotation'in accordance with the score earned by the batted ball. The wheel cannot start in rotation until the latch 97 is, by the means hereinafter described, caused to release it, and it only continues in rotation during the time that the latch 97 is out of engagement withthe lugs 96-carried by the wheel; The means for rotating the wheel 80 will pres ently be described,- and since the gear teeth and pinion wheel 86 have been hereinbefore referred to, it may be mentioned at this 5' place that the shaft 87 carrying said pinion wheel 86 also carries a disk 100 whose outer portions pass between the poles of a magnet' 101, the latter with the disk 100 constituting a magnetic dra or brake for controlling the movement of t e wheel 80 and compelling said wheelto have a timed rotation and the buttons or travelers 79 a controlled movement from base to base. The teeth 85 on the wheel 80 byengaging the pinion wheel 86 causes the shaft 87 carrying the disk 100 to have a rapid movement between the poles of the magnet 101, whose magnetic force acts to retard the rotation of said disk 100 and shaft 87 and thereby control the movementof the wheel 80. When the wheel 80 is brought to a 86, and to permit this result the latch 97 it is desirable, so' asto avoid'danger of breaking the teeth 85 or those of the pinion" wheel 86, that the ,disk 100'may con-'- tinue in motion for a limitedperiod, so as to expend its momentum, without acting against or tending to actuate the said inion Wheel disk 100 looselyupon the-shaft 87' arid provide the same with an integral ratchet W eel shaft 87 an arm 103 carrying a s ring pawl 104 to engage said ratchet whee During mount the the rotation of the shaft 87vfrom the large wheel 80 the pawl 104 engaging the ratchet 102 will compel the rotation oft'he disk 100 with said shaft, and when the Wheel 80 is brought to a stop and the plate 103, pawl 104 and shaft 87 are thereby arrested, the; disk 100 may continue inmotion, the ratchet wheel 102 then sliding-its teeth over the point of the pawl 104 an the wheel 80, likely wrench or break the 3 1M104; In-'the absence of the ratchet 102 and' iflthe disk 100 weresecured to the shaft 87, said disk, due to teeth of the pinion wheel 86 or,the teeth'85,

ut by providing means for allowing the disk to continue in motion after the'wheel 80- is brought to a stop, the liability of straining the teeth of the pinion wheel 86 or of the wheel 80 is avoided. a

The wheel 80-re'ceives its'm'otion from the power shaft105fthrough thegear wheel 1'06 mounted thereon and pinion wheel 82,-the latter, as hereinbefore described, being keyed to said wheel 80 ,1 and said' power shaft 105 receives its motion, when it-is released to rotate, from a weighted arm 107 secured upon the olygonal inner end of said shaft and nor' mal y extending upwardly and outwardly, as

indicated in Fig. 10, so that when saidjshaft 105 is released-to rotate, the weight of said arm will cause the latter to turn downwardly at its outer end and effect, as by a crank'mo tion, the rotation of said shaft 105 and through it and the gearwheel 106 and pinion 82, the movement of the large wheel 80, said shaft" 105fand said wheel 80 only remainin in motion during the descent'of th'e weighte arm 107 and ceasing to rotate the..moment said arm 107 ceases its movement. Upon the outer end of the arm 107 I- provide a suit Iii 5 ableweight 1 08 to eflect the downward'move- 1 ment of saidv arm.- The gear wheel 106 is loose on the shaft 105, but during each de-" scending movement of-the arm 107 becomes I locked thereto by means of the ratchet wheel 109, pawl 110 (Fig. 10) and arm" 111 to which said pawl is pivotallysecured and which is fastened to the shaft 105 by means of a pin or otherwise, as shown .in'Fi 17. arm 107,descends to "turn t e shaft 105, this action causes the farm 111, fastened tosaid shaft to carry the pawl 110 upwardly against When the 75. 102 (Figs. 11, '12, .13), and secure upon theshown in'Fig. 17. After the arm 107 has de scended to the proper extent, which is controlled by the electric current in connection 2 said guide-wayand are'm the assembled ma- 1 with the latch 97, the attendant will manually push the outer end of said arm upwardly to its initial position indicated in Fig. 10, and

during this resetting of the arm 107 the shaft 105 and arm 111 will'have a reverse movethe teeth of the ratchet wheel 109 withoutactuating said wheel, the purpose being, to reset the arm 111 and parts connected therewith without, during the resetting of the arm 107, imparting any movement to the gear wheel 106 or large wheel 80. The gear wheel 106, pinion wheel 82 and large wheel ro tate during the downward movement of the arm 107 and remains stationary-during the upward or resetting movement of said arm.

The arm 111 has connected to its upper end a chain or flexible connection 112 whose lower end is secured to an arm 27 integral with a sleeve 28 loosely mounted upon a pin 114 and having an integral arm 113 parallel with said. arm 27, said pin 114 being carried by a portion of the irame-work for the general mechanism, as shown in Figs. 10 and 11. Upon the pin 114 is a coiled spring 115, one end of which is bent over and thereby placed in engagement with the upper edge of the ,arm 113, while the other'end of said spring is bent under and placed in engagement with the lower edge of an arm 116which is pivotally mounted upon the outerend of said'pin 114 and extends laterally between projec tions 117 secured to a vertical rod 118 which extends upwardly within a vertical guide- Way-119 for the buttons or travelers79. The guide-way 119 is of box formation having a vertical slot in its outer face and being adapted to receive the inner heads 92v of the buttons or travelers 79, while the outer heads 91 of said buttons project outwardly beyond chine, at the outer side of the diamond-indicator face-plate 76', as shown in Fig. 14, inv

which saidbuttons are illustrated as located in the slot 78 which is directly in front of and in lihe with the slot in the face of said guideway 119. Upon the upper end of the rod 1 18 is provided a head or follower 120 which engages the lower one of'the-buttons 79 and is utilized at the proper time for pressing the upper button into the lower corner of the diamend slot 7 7, as shown Figs. 10 and 14, and to continue to press said buttons, one after another,- into said corner of'said slot, as the buttons are, oneafter another, caused to] travelfrom base to base or corner to corner of said slot. a

Y ssaai'e the front of the gear teeth 85, as shown in Fig. 11, and supports a segmental foot 121 which is close to the periphery of that portion of the wheel 80 formed by the segments 89.' The mouth at the upper end of the guide-way 119 leads directly into one of the undercut slots of thewheel 80 so that the buttons held in the said guide-way, when pressed upwardly by the follower 120 on the rod 118, may enter a slot 90 of said wheel. When a button is pushed upwardly by the follower 120 into a slot 90 of the wheel 80 it will, as shown in Fig. 1 1, become arrested by the lower corner of the face-plate 76, said corner being slightly cut away at its right hand side to form a bearing for the neck of the buttons pressed against it and the cut away portion "leaving a recess which opens toward the right direetlyinto the slot 77, so that upon the movement of the wheel 80 the top button may readily enterand be carried along said slot, the button during its passage along the diamond-slot 7 7 which is angular,

necessarily moving inwardly and outwardly along its carrying slot 90 so that it may, while carried upon a circular wheel, follow the angular outline of the diamond held.

The spring is under tension when the arm 11] is in its upper normal position, shown in Fig. 10, the length of the chain 112 being such that the upward movement of the arm 111 takes all of the slack out of said chain and draws said chain. upwardly to a limited extent to eiiect an upward movement of the arms 113 and. 116 connected with said spring, the arm 113 turningupwardly and acting through the spring 115 to turn the am 116 upwardly against the resistance rod 118, as. shown in Fig. L0, this resistance to the movement of the arm 116 creating a tension in the spring 11 5 which tension is exerted' against the rod 118 and through said rod against the buttons or travelers 7 9. The purpose ofapplying the spring pressure to the rod 118 is to cause the upper button or traveler 79 to pass from the slot 78 of the face-plate 76 and guide-way 119 into the undercut slot 90 which may become stationary .above said guide-way. The, lever arm 116 is of considerable length and hence with but a limited movement of the short arm 113, ample spring pressure may be exerted against the rod 1 18 to cause it to follow up the guide-l way 119 and press into the lower slot 90 of thewheel 80 all ofthe buttons or travelers 11 irop downwardly and with them the rod 65. The upper end ofthe guide-way 119 is I 11c drops downwardly from thebuttons or ICO offered by one of the projections 117 on the would remain constantly pressed against each other and against the periphery ofthe wheel 80, which would be undesirable, and

therefore I provide mechanismfor preserving i the spring tension against the rod 118 and.

buttons or travelers 79 only during the period that the wheel 80 is stationary, and relieving such tension from said r'odi as soon as the wheel 80 starts in motion. I provide the shoe 121 at-the right of the upper end of the guideway119 so that-by no possibility may a button ortraveler- 7 9,'whe'1i starting on its course along'tlie diamond slot 77,- sag below the lower endof the slot 90 carrying it.

Itwill be understood from the foregoing description that the wheel 8 0*is actuated, from the driving shaft 105 through the arm 111, ratchet wheel'109, pawl 11.0, gear wheel 106 and pinion wheel 82, the latter beingkeyed to said wheel 80., and that said shaft 105 is set in motion by the turning downment oi this arm impartin rotation to said Wardly of the weighted'arm 107, the moveshaft. It will also be'un' erstoodthat the wheel 80 and through it, the-shaft 105 and arm 107 are heldstationary, except when.

definitely operated, by means of the pivoted spring latch 97 (Fig. 15) held in en agement 'with one'of the lugs 96 on the spolres 94 of the wheel 80. v

The pivoted latch 97 always holds the wheel 80 and the other parts of the mechanism in a stationary condition except when a ballpassing through or over the target 31 descends upon one of the spring contacts 55, 56, 57', 58, and thereby completes an'electric circuit leading to the indicator casing 68 and energizing the magnet 122 (Fig, 15) for the purpose of'causing the latter to draw toward it t e spring armature 123, which normally holds thelatch 97 in the path of the lugs 96 of thewheel 80, but which, whendrawn to the electro-magnet 122, allows said latch, by

I gravity, to turn downwardly out of the path of said lugs 96, thereby freeing the wheel 80 and permitting the Weighted arm 107 to turn downwardly and through the shaft 105 and intermediate connections, rotate. the wheel- 80 to an extent governed-by the length-of timethe-magnet 122 retains the armature 123, and the latch 97 remains out of the path of the lugs96 of said wheel.

The period of rotation of the wheel 80 permitted by the elect ic circuits is governed by the gamevalue of the ball batted, that is whethe'r' it.

entitles'a player to a run to first-base or to secondbase or to third-baseor to a home latch 97 into run. While the circuit remains unbroken through the electro-magnet 122, the latter will retain the armature 1 23 and the latch 97 will remain out of the path of the stop-lugs 96 on the wheel 80, and hence I provide Wheel 80, breaks the circuit through the eleictro-magnet 122 in accordance with the I 70 means which, during the rotationof the game-Value of the ball-batted, commencing.

with the batting of a ball entitling the player to a run to second-base; For a first-base hitfrom the spring contact 55) and the magnet Q i 122 permitting the armature 123 to restore upon the succeeding spoke of the wheelarriving at the latch, thelatter will engage the same and stop the wheel, the. wheel then having turned a suflicient distance tocarry theuppertraveler'or button 79 from the home-base position along the diamond slot 77 to first-base position. When, however, a batted ball entitles the player to a run be- ,yond first-base, say to second-base, the latch 97 must remain out of the path of the stop lugs' 96 of the wheel until at least two spokes of said wheel have passed said latch, whereupon the latch may return to its engagin positionso as to catch the third spoke o' the wheel, the wheel then having been permitted, in its one-half rotation, to carry a button 'or'traveler 79 from the homethe latch 97 to its operative position, so that base position to the second-base position v and the traveleror button previously on the first-base having by this operation, reached the third-base position In the event ofthe game-value of a batted ball entitling alplayer to a run to third-base, the circuit must be maintained through the electro m'agnet 122 long enough for the latch 97 to remain out of the path of thestop' lugs 96 until three spokes pass said latch, so that a button or traveler 79 may be carried from the home-base position around to the third-base position, .the wheelv 80 becoming arrested at that point (upon completing a three-quarter rotation) by the breaking of the circuit through the electro-magnet 122 and the return of the position to stop said wheel. If a'batted ball should entitle the player to a home-run, the electric circuit through the magnet 122 must be maintained long enough for the .wheel 80 to perform a complete rotation, thereby permitting it to carry a traveler or' button 79 from the home-base position entirely around the diamond slot 7 7 and back to said position, all buttons ortravelers 79 on the bases at the time of this run being,- one after another, carried to the home-base position and dropping into the slot 78, the spring rod 118 then being its IIC lower position and permitting said buttons to automatically descend, one alter another, into said slot. Owing to the relative-proportions of the gear wheels 106 and 82, a

limited movement of the weighted-arm107 and shaft 105 IS enabled to sheet a complete rotation of the wheel 80.

The means I provide for breaking the circuit through the, electro-magnet 122 so that the wheel 80 maybecome arrested at diiierent periods of its rotation in accordance with the game-values of the batted balls, are

shown in Fig. 10, in which it may beobserved that upon a plate 124 of insulating material,

are formed through these respective springs in accordance with the game-value of the batted ball at all times when said value is above that of a run to firstbase, and the circuits are broken at said posts 131, 132, 133, respectively, so as to denergize the magnet 122 and permit the spring latch 97 to regain its position for stopping the Wheel 80 after said latch has remained out of its operative position long enough to permit the wheel 80 to perform its propermovement in accord ance with the game-value of the batted balls.

Upon the batting ofa ball and the ener gizing of the magnet 122 by the circuit made by the batted ball falling on one of the contacts 55, 56, 57, 58, the wheel 80 will start in motion due to the descent of theweighted arm 107 and, as above explained, the arm 111 fastened uponthe driving shaft 105 will move downwardly with said arm 107. If we assume that a batted ball (havingfallen upon the spring contact 56) entitles the player to arun to second-base, it will be understood that the wheel 80 must carry a button or traveler 79 from the home-base posit'ion'to second-base and. then must come to a positive stop; and to accomplish this result the upper end. of thearm 111 after a sufficient number of. the lugs 96 have passed thelatch 97 to assure the carriage of the button or traveler to second-base, will move against the flexed spring 125 and press the same from the post 126, thereby-breaking the circuit at said post and deenergizing the magnet 122 so that the latch 97 may assume its normal position and stop the Wheel. 80 at the time when saidbutton or traveler is at the second base.

If the batted ball has a game-value of three bases the circuit made by the ball falling upon the contact 57, will energizethe magnet 122 and permit the withdrawal of the latch 97 from its operative position, and said magnet 122 will remain energized until the wheel 80 has carried three of its spokes or three lugs 96 by the said latch and the arm 111 has descended sufliciently to break the electric circuit at the post 132 by moving downwardly against the spring 126 and fore-- ing said. spring from its electrical connection with said post, the dener izing of the magnet 122 by the breakage oi the circuit at the post 132 permitting the latch 97 to return to its operative position for arresting the wheel,

with the button or traveler 79 on the third base, said button or traveler having been 1 carried to that position on a continuous runfrom home-base. I

If the game-value of the ball should be a home-run, due to the ball falling upon the contact 58, the electric circuit will. be n1aintained through the magnet 122 until the arm 11] has descended against and pressed the spring 127 from electrical connection with time may pass said latch, said latch immediately regaining its normal position so as to stop thewheel 80 after it has made a onequarter turn carrying the button ortraveler to first-base.

For a second-base run the latch 97 must remain out of its operative position long i enough for two spokes of the wheel 80 to pass it, and therefore means are provided for maintaining the electric circuit through the magnet 122 until the two spokes of the wheel 80 pass said latch 97, and promptly there after the arm 111 by moving against the spring 125 breaks this circuit and allows the latch 97 to regain its operative position, so

that upon the third spoke of the wheel reaching it, the wheel may be arrested.

For a third base-runthe electric circuit must be maintained through the electromagnet 122 until three spokes of the wheel 80 have passed by the latch 97, whereupon-the 7 arm 111 by moving against the spring 126 will break the circuit at the post 132 and permit the latch 97 to regain its operative osition so that upon the fourth spoke o the wheel 80 reaching said latch, said wheel will become arrested thereby.

For a home-run, the electric circuit must be maintained through the electro magnet I 122 until the Wheel: has carried its four is broken at t e time specified by'the arm 111 7; turn to-carry abutton or'travelerto first-base,

' the same from it s elec'trica1' fi c nw thepost133. l

spokes by the latch'97,andvthereafter the circuit must be broken so that'uponfthe button or travelerreaching the home-base position,- the'latch 97 may .bein its'foperative position, ready tosto the wheel 80,, and this circuit moving against the spring 127 and forcing,-

The wheel 80 therefore makes a one-quarter a two-quarter turnfor carryingthe traveler to to. the battery 137.v The circuit, justl'de' through said magnet and the conductor 142 scribed is an ordinary simple electriccircuit suflicientto enableth'e magnet l22' to 1116- Y second-base, a three-quarter turnlfor carrying the traveler to third'-bas e',-and acomplete. r-

' 1 home run,and;at-each proper stage ofits the latch 97, saidlatchbymechanismisetinto 'inentarily trip the latch 19780 that the-wheel '1 80 may carry one of itsspokes by it, and this .80' J circuit b comes brokenby the 'base-ball leav j .ingr'the contact '55. androlling down the trough-;.- There is 1110 necessity fora first base run, ,to -maintain the; electric circuit f l tation for carrying the traveler to makel a rn'overnent the Wheel 80 becorn es arrested by r that the movement of the 'Wheelf80is kept 2 5' ar1n 107 effects a downward inoyement of the 0 upper end of the arm lllfwhich arm not I the spring,115.and permit the rod 118 to slide the WheelSO, the spring 115having' sufficient 5 tension to perform this duty cven though there'may be only one button left the siot 78, the otl'1ers1bein g on the bases, as shown.

' control-magnet'122and in this figure Iillusoperation-by the batted- .ball permitting the Wheel to perform its seyeral movements-'- to destroy the attractive feature-of the-dia- .net 101. m

, cated in'Fig. 10, this-movement'having no When the attendant pushes'the armr107 1 wardly for re-s'tartin'g the same, the arm 111. is caused to move"upwardlyalso,.being"fas in accordance with th'elgame -yalues of the balls batted; I hayezldescribed herei'nbefore;

under contro1,so'that it' is not allowed -to carry the buttons-ortravelers 79 80 swiftlyas mend-indicator 68,by means of the electric brake represented bythe and 'mag-- After eachnavementfof the wheel ,80

will grasp the arm 107 and-push-the samelu Wardl'y tolits normal initial position in ieflect upon thewheel 60, as hereinbefore eX- only breaks the circuits atthe posts 131 132, 133, but also slackens the chani112 to relaxdownwardly so that the buttons or travelers 79 in the slot 78.1n'ay-not 'be held pressed,- against the periphery of the movingwheel' 80.

tened to the shaft 105, and thereby thechain 112 is again drawn taut and the spring 115 placed under tension, with the result that the arm 116 Will press the 'rod- 118'upWardly' and cause this rod to force the then upper button or'traveler 79 into thethen lower slot 90 of" in Fig.2.

In' Fig. 5 18 1 illustrate diagrammatically the electric circuits'utilized in energizing'the trate the springicontact'sc55, 56, 57 and- '58 upon which the-battedflballs, descen l and through.the-electrdmagnet "I22 longer than .85

the spokes of the Wheel 8'0,may 'passby'the 'latch 97, and hence Iproyide relaysj1e3, 144, 1145, for maintaining; localelectric circuitsg through the magnetw122vfor, respectively, second-base, third-base and home-runs, after off ;from' the contacts; 56, 57

the balls roll and" 58.

JWhen a batted ball 'fa'llsupon the contact r'oo -56, and'clo ses the circuit fora second-base ,r'u'n, the"circuit will zbeiformed, commencing the battery 137, through the conductors 138, 139,v 64,- contacts 60,56, conductor .146, 5 through the relay 143",conductor 1-28, spring ,1o5 'f '125,0st131,;conductor134, cbndHOtQrl-O erightof said conductor 1'34) and Icon-f 'ductor L41- to the magnet T122, whence the ,conductor"14;2' leads back to the battery:1'37, the local circuitlthrou'ghj the relay? 143 being rro '5". completed-from the battery137, through the conductor 1'48. The circuit havingbeenesj tablished: through therelay 143, the -1atter i willflrnaintain the same after the ,ball'leaves the contact 56 untilthe circuit is broken 11's.-

thearn'r 111 descending agamst and pressing thefspring 125 from the postliil, at which:

net 122 become deenergiz'ed. 1

1 [For 'a third-base run the circuit made by 1 20 .the ball falling upon the sprin contact 57 will be, commencing with the; 'a'ttery v137, through the conductors 138, 139, 65, contacts 61;, 57 conductor 149,through the relay 144,, conductor-129., spring 126, post 132, condu'c 1 2 5' torand conductor 141 to themagnet 1 22;

whence the conductor 142 passes back to the 'batt'ery137. Thelocalcir cuit created by the a relay 144 Will maintainlthe magnet 122 ener gized after the batted ball rolls from contact 1 o 57 and until the arm has descended sufficiently to push the spring 126 from electrical engagement with the post 132, whereupon the circuit having been broken at said post, the magnet 122 will become denergized and the latch 97-return to its operative 7 position preparatory to stopping the wheel 80.

In the event that the batted ball entitles the'player to a home-run, the circuit made by'said ball falling upon the contact 58 will,

starting with the battery 137, be through the 122 after the ball rolls ofl from the contact 58, until the arm 11]. descends against and pushes the spring 127 from its electricalem gagement with the post 133, whereupon the circuit having been broken at said post, the magnet 122 will become denergized and the trip latch 97 will return to its normal 0 erative position ready to arrest the whee. 80

upon the completion of the one rotation of the latter. It will be understood that the re lays 143, 144 and 145 are introduced for their usual purposes of creating local circuits and maintaining the same through the elec tro-magnet 122 until the wheel 80 has per. formed its proper movement, and these local circuits are broken at the proper time by the arm 111 which travels with said wheel. N0 relay is provided for the circuit made by the ball falling upon the contact 55 because that circuit need only be maintained momentarily. In. addition to the circuits hereinhefore described I provide one further circuit which is to be completed by the attendant pressing against the push button 153 prO vided in the side of the indicator casing 68, and this circuit is for the purpose of, at the end of-a game, permitting the wheel 80 to have a suliicient rotation for returning all of the buttons or travelers 79 which may been the bases, to the home slot 7 8 or to the position shown in Fig. '14, thereby, upon the resetting of the arm 107, leaving the entire ap paratus in condition for starting a new game. The circuit through the magnet -122 created by pressing on the push button 153 will be through the relay 145, as shown in'Fig. 18, the conductor 154 connected with said push button leading to said relay, and the conductor 155 connected with the contact for said button leading to the batteryconductor 148. When the push-button 153 is pressed inwardly it completes a circuit through the magnet 122, with the result that the latch 97 is permitted to recede to its inoperative po' sition and the weighted arm or motor 107 will descend and rotate the wheel 80 to resteers turn all of the buttons or travelers then on the bases to the h0n1eslot 78, the arm 111 descending with the arm 107 so as to relax the spring 115 and permit the follower rod 118 to descend and enable saidv buttons to en ter saidslot.

The circuit established by pressing the push button 153 inwardly will be broken at the post 133 when the arm 111 presses the spring 127 therefrom.

The constructlon of the relays 143, 144

and l45 will be recognized without detailed description, 156. designating their electro magnets, 157 the armatures, 158 the plates against which the upper ends of said armatures contact when said armatures are attracted by said magnets and 159 the iron supporting frames, from which the plates 158 are insulated. The relays are provided simply to maintain theelectro-magnet 122 energized proper length of time for the but tons or travelers to make their respective runs after the balls roll oil from the contacts 55, 56, 57, 5s.

What I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters-Patent, is

1. In a game-apparatus of the character described, a chamber into which balls are to be driven, a target composed of strips of webbing secured in edge to edge relation at the inner end of said ch amber and thro ughwhich target the balls are to pass, independent chutes beyond said target to receive the balls, and electric contacts on which the balls fall upon descending within said chutes, combined with .an indicator having a face possessing a diamond-slot, buttohs to trav-w ICO erse said slot from base to base, means within.

said indicator for carrying said buttons along said slot, a device for actuating said button carrying means, a stop to normally hold. said button-carrying means stationary, and electrical means including a circuit for rendering said stop inoperative for a limited period upon a ball striking one of said contacts; sub.-

stantially as set forth.

2. In a game-apparatus of the character described, a chamber into which balls are to be driven, a target composed of strips of webhing secured in edge to edge relation at the inner end of sald chamber and through which target the balls are to pass, posts to which the ends of said strip are secured and one of which is capable oi rotation for drawing said strips taut, independent chutes beyond said target to receive the balls, and electric contacts on which the balls fall upon descending within said chutes, combined with an. indicater having a 'face possessing'a diamondslot, buttons to traverse said slot-from base to base, meanswithin said indicator 1 or carrymg saidbuttons along said slot, a device for actuating said button-carrying means, a stop to normally hold said button-carrying means stationary, and electrical means including a v circuit for rendering said stop inoperative for a limited ,period 'upon a* striking one of said contacts; substantially as set forth.

v Ina 'gameapparatus of the character,

described, a chamber into which balls are-,to,

be driven, independent chutes, at" the inner ,end of said chamberto respectively receive the balls of different game-values, and electric contacts to be acted upon-by the balls en;

.teringsaid chutes, combined with an-indicator having a-face possessinga.diamond-slot, buttons to traverse. said slot from base to base, 'meanswithin said-indicator for, carry ing said buttons along said 'slot," a device for actuatingsaid l utton-earrying'means, a stop to normally hold said button-carrying means stationary, and; electrical means'includiiigia circuit for rendering said stp ino )erative for a limited-period upon a .bal stri one of .said contacts; substantially asisetforth, 3

4. "In a game-a paratus of the "character.

described, a chain er in'tolwhich balls are to I b'e'driven,' independentfchutes at the inn-er, end of saidscham'ber to respectively receive j thelballs of gdifi'erent. game-values, electric v r tering said chutes, and inclined troughs leadcontacts .to be acted upon'by the balls en- ,ing fronr said chutes for" directing the balls therefiromback to the battersposition, corn vbi'ned cwith'anfindicator having a face pose 3 7 .o said slot from base to base; means' within-said ses'sing a diamond-slot, buttons to traversedndicatorfor carrying said buttonsalong said slot, a'devicefor actuatingsaid buttoncarry% ingmeai1 s "a stop to .n'ornially holdlsaid but? meansl ncluding a circuit-for rendering sald ton-carrying means stationary, andelectrical' stop inoperative forfal-iinited-period upon-a tially asset forth.

. ..-i .5.- In'- a, game-a paratus of the character, described, acham l bejdrive'n', independentjchutes at the inner ball striking one of said contactsfsubstanerintowhich balls are to 1" end'of said chamber to respectively receive {the balls. off'difl'erent game values, electric contacts tojbe acted upon. by theballs entering} said. chutes, nclined troughs extending from said chutes toward their'dnt of said charnben a general'receiving trough 54 into which said troughs lead,- a rfeceiver-49'for -the' balls-rolling down said trough 54 and' bei ng' open; at one end of itsb'ottomto' perm'itjone ball to settle downsomewha'tbelowthe floor.

I of said receiver, a s ring below "1e open-end i of said receiver, an means for actuating said spring to eject upwardly tlz'e'ballover it so' that said ball maybe batted, combinedwith an indicator having 'a face possessing a (lin mond slot; buttonsto traverse said slot from base to base, means'within saidindicator for carrying said buttons-along. said slot, a de vice for actuating 'said 7 button-carrying means, a; stop to normally'hold said buttonc-arrying rneans'stationary, and electrical means includinga circuit for rendering said stop inoperativefor a l mited period upon'a Y b ll-sfifikiii l'i for as a a s-mtially-as setforth.

6.111 a game-apparatus oftli'e1character described, a chain 7 be'driv'en; means Vfor returningfthe balls to 54 to receivefthellballs returned, a receiver 49 connected therewith and into which the balls'roll and which is/open at one end of its P bottom to? permit a, one ball to settle down "er into which balls are to I 7 7o "the' front ofsaid: chamber, a general; trough somewhat below thefloor of said receiver, a

.spring' bel'owthe. open end of; said receiver,

and means'for-actuating said spring to eject traverse s'aidlslot from base to base, means within said-indicator for. carrying said buttons alongisaid slot, a device for actuating said button caliryu'ng means, a stop tofn'ormally hold-said button-carrying means sta-' tionary, and electrical means including ,a

circuit 'for rendering said stop inoperative 'forja limited period upon a'ball striking one of said contacts{substantially.as set forth. --'8. In= a garneeapparatus of the character described, a series of electric contacts to be "res'pectivelyengaged" by. driven balls in aci cordance with their respective game-values, combined with anindic-ator having a face possessing-a diamond-slot, buttons to traverse said s'lotfrombase to "base astop to norinally holdsaid button-carrying 'dering sai'd'stop. inoperative .u on a "ball striking} one" of said contacts, an a means for varying-thefp'eriods during which said stop es'hall-remain inoperative in accordance with es of the balls; substantially the game valu sset forth, I .u In agame-apparatus means fortv "carrying said-buttons alongsaid-sl-ot, a device 'f for actuating said button carrying -means,

rco'

1o 5 ,means stat1onary, electrical mfeans for'r'enof: the character described, a seriesfofelectric cojntacts to be'f:

respectively 'eng'a'gedby. driven balls in accordance' with their respective}. game-values, combined with an indicator having a face possessing 'a' diamond slot, buttons to'traverse said slot froni base to base, means for carrying'saidibuttons alon said slot,- a device for actuating said uttonc arrying means', a stopto nor'mallyjhold 'said'buttoncarrying means stationary, eIectrical meanS for rendering said step. inoperative upon a ball strikinglone ofs'aid oontacts, means acting in; opposition to said actuatin device for controlling the-'s'peed'of ,said utton-L carrying nieans,'; and means for varying the periods during which said stop shall remain inoperative. in accordance 'with the, game- 5 -face possessing a .diamond'slot, buttons'to ments of .saiddiamond-slot, means for actu ating said wheel, a stop to normally hold.

' said wheel stationary, electrical means for rendering said stop inoperative upon a ball striking one of said contacts, and means for varying the period during which said stop shall remain inoperative in accordance with the game-values of the balls; substantially as set forth.

11. In a game-apparatus of the character described, a series ofelectric contacts to be respectively engaged by driven balls in accordance with their respective game-values,

'combinedwith an indicator having a face-- plate possessing a diamond-slot, buttons to traverse'said slot, a wheel behind said faceplate and having in it radial slots for carrying said buttons along said diamond-slot, said radial slots permitting the buttons to slide back and forth in them to meet the require-'" ments of'saiddiamondslot, means for actuating said wheel, a stop to normally hold said wheel stationary, electrical means for rendering said stop inoperative upon a ball striking one of said contacts, means acting in opposition to said wheel for controlling its speed, and means for varying the period during which said stop shall remain inoperative in accordance with the game-values of the balls; substantially as set forth.

' 12. in a game-apparatus of the character described, a series of electric contacts to be respectively engaged by driven balls in ac cordance with their respective game-values,

combined with an indicator having a faceplate possessinga diamond-slot, buttons to traverse said slot, awheel behind said faceplate and having in it radial slots for carrying said buttons along said diamond-slot, said radial slots permitting the buttons to slide back and forth in them'to meet-the require ments of said diamond-slot, means for actuating said wheel, a stop-.to normally hold said wheel stationary, electricalfmeans for rendersing said stp p inoperative upon a ball striking one of said contacts, a rotary shaft (87) geared to saidwheel and adaptedto rotate oppositely thereto, a rotary disk ,(100) mounted on said shaft, pawl and ratchet mechanism normally connecting said disk with. said shaft and adapted to impart mo= tion to the same when said shaft is in motion and to permit the momentum of said disk to continue it in motion independently of said shaft when the latter stops, a magnet in whose iields aid disk rotates, and means for varying the periodduring which said stop shall remain inoperative in accordance with the game-values of the balls; substantially as set forth. s

13. In a game-apparatus of the character described, a series of electric contacts to be respectively engaged by driven balls in accordance with their respective game-values,

combined with an indicator having a faceplate possessing a diamond-siot, buttons to traverse said slot, a wheel behind said faceplate and having in it radial slots'for carrying .said buttons along said diamond-slot, said radial slots permitting the. buttons to slide back and forthin them to meet the requirements of said diamond-slot, means for actuating said wheel, a stop to normally hold said wheel stationary, electrical means for rendering said stop inoperative upon a ball striking one of said contacts, means for delivering one of said buttons into said diamond-slot at the home-base position each time said wheel actuating means is reset after an operation of said wheel, and means for varying the period during which said stop shall remain inoperative in accordance with the gamewalues of the balls; substantially asset forth.

let. In a game-apparatus of the character described, a series of electric contacts to be respectively engaged by driven balls in ac cordance with their respective game-values,

combined with an indicator having a fat-e plate possessing a diamond-slot and a homeslotleading thereto at the home-base position, buttons to traverse said diamond-slot and to initially lie within said home-slot, a wheel behind said face-plate and having in it radial slots for'carrying said buttons along said diamond-slot, means for actuating saidwheel, spring actuated means normally pressing the buttons in said home-slot toward said diamond-slot, a stop to normally hold said I wheel stationary, electrical: means for rendering said stop inoperative upon a ball strikmg one of said contacts so that said wheel may be rotated by its actuating means,-

means in operative connection with said wheel actuating means for releasing the spring pressure from said buttons in the h0me-slot while said Wheel is in motion, and means for varying the period during which said wheel may'remain in motion; substantially as set forth.

.15. In a game-apparatus of the character described, a series of electric contacts to be respectively engaged by driven balls in ac- 'cordance with their respective game-values,

combined with an indicator having a faceplate possessing a diamond-slot and a homeslot leading thereto at the home-base posi-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2886318 *May 3, 1952May 12, 1959John P TarboxSimulated baseball game apparatus
US3111318 *Sep 27, 1960Nov 19, 1963William G NorthrupGame
US4758002 *May 19, 1987Jul 19, 1988Murphy Patrick MIndoor baseball
US4973061 *Nov 18, 1987Nov 27, 1990Catherall Raymond HIndoor baseball game apparatus
US4995607 *Dec 12, 1989Feb 26, 1991Whitfield Terry BInteractive sports training device
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63B63/00, A63F7/0608