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Publication numberUS861153 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1907
Filing dateOct 2, 1906
Priority dateOct 2, 1906
Publication numberUS 861153 A, US 861153A, US-A-861153, US861153 A, US861153A
InventorsJohn S Yergason
Original AssigneeJohn S Yergason
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glass for counting picks or threads in fabrics.
US 861153 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 861,153.. PATENTED JULY 23, 1907. J. S. YBRGASON.

I GLASS FOR COUNTING PICKS 0R THREADS IN FABRICS.

APPLICATION nun 001'. 2. 1900.

WITNESSES. INVENTOI? ATTORNEYS n1: umzms PETERS co.. wnsnmcrou. o. c.

each end of a connecting piece.

JOHN S. YERGASON, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

GLASS FOR COUNTING- PIGKS OR THREADS IN FABRICS;

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 23, 1907.

Application filed October 2, 1906. Serial No. 337,139.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that JOHN S. YERGASON, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State of New York, with posti office address 845 Park Place, Brooklyn, New York, has invented certain new and useful Improvements in Glass for Counting Picks or Threads in Fabrics, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to instruments for counting the number of picks or threads in fabrics as used by clothing manufacturers and dealers to determine the quality of the goods.

The construction of the instrument employed in carrying out my invention is preferably the same as already on the market and old in the art. This instrument is preferably constructed so that it can be folded together in a flat form and thus occupy very little space and consists of two leaves one hinged to A magnifying lens is set in one of said leaves while the other has a hole cut in the center. This connecting piece is of such length that when the two leaves are turned over at right angles thereto, the hole in the one leaf will be in the focus of the lens located in the other leaf and forms a sight, so that upon placing the instrument upon a piece of fabric in such manner that the leaf having the hole rests flat upon the fabric the lens will magnify the threads of the same and render them so they can be easily and readily counted. So much for the instrument as hitherto put upon the market the difficulty therein being that the metal at the sides of the hole in the lower leaf would throw a shadow upon the goods and thus make reliable counting difficult. I obviate this difficulty by cutting away the metal on one side of the hole or sight and thus allow the light to enter and illuminate the surface of the goods. This simple change greatly increases the value of the instrument for reliable and accurate counting.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of an instrument of the character described, the same having been unfolded and ready to inspect the threads or picks of a piece of fabric. Fig. 2 is a plan of the same. Fig. 3 is a horizontal section on the line x-x, Fig. 1.

The leaf 1 is hinged to the part 2 at its upper edge in such manner that it will turn over and lie flat against the section 2 in one direction and in. the other direction will come to a stop at right angles to the section 2. In this leaf 1 a magnifying lens 3 is mounted. At the lower end of the section 2, and at a distance from the leaf 1 equal to the length of the focus of the lens 3 a leaf 4 is hinged so that it will, in one direction fold over the leaf 1 and in the other, comes to a stop perpendicular to the section 2 and directly beneath the leaf 1. A hole 5 is cut in said leaf 4 in the center thereof and forms a sight for the lens 3 through which threads of a piece of fabric may be counted when the leaf 4 is placed flat thereon. To do away with shadows across the goods within the sight 5 the metal at one side is cut away as indicated at 6 thus allowing light to enter the space 5 and permit the light to enter and illuminate the top surface of the fabric under observation. The point 4 resting on the fabric might be used as a starting or indicating point in counting the threads which would be positive owing to the open space of light as against the unreliable way in the old instrument owing to the shadow cast by the thickness of the metal on the side 4. The aperture in the side of the sight 5 might be of any size or character without departing from the spirit of my invention but is preferably of the form shown.

While I describe an instrument as constructed so that the same may be folded, my invention is equally applicable to an instrument in which the parts are rigidly connected.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. In an instrument for counting picks or threads in fabrics, a magnifying lens, a sight adapted to rest fiat on the fabric and through which the fabrics may be counted, and an opening in the side of said sight adapted to allow the light to illuminate the surface of the fabric being viewed, as and for the purpose described.

2. A glass for counting picks or threads in fabrics consisting of a hinged leaf containing a magnifying lens, a hinged leaf adapted to rest flat on the fabric and having an opening therein forming a sight for said lens, a connecting piece for said leaves and an aperture in the side of said sight through which the light may enter and illuminate the threads being counted, as and for the purpose described.

3. An instrument for counting picks or threads in fabrics consisting of a magnifying lens, a sight in the focus of said lens adapted to rest flat on the fabric and through which the threads may be counted, and an aperture in the side of said sight through which the light may enter and illuminate the top surfaces of the threads being counted.

4. In an instrument for counting picks or threads in fabrics, a magnifying lens, a sight adapted to rest flat on the fabric and through which the threads may be read and an opening in the side of said sight through which the light may enter and illuminate the top surface of the fabric being viewed, the sides of said opening resting on the fabric and forming indicating points, as and for the purpose described.

Signed at New York in the county of New York and State of New York this 26th day of September A. D. 1906.

' JOHN S. YERGASON.

Witnesses Hnnnnncr J. STREULI, Gnonrnnr Hownnn.

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG02B25/02