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Publication numberUS867432 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 1, 1907
Filing dateFeb 8, 1907
Priority dateFeb 8, 1907
Publication numberUS 867432 A, US 867432A, US-A-867432, US867432 A, US867432A
InventorsCharles H Smith
Original AssigneeCharles H Smith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pleasure-railway.
US 867432 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 867,432. PATENTHD OCT. 1, 1907.

- o. E. SMITH.

PLEASURE RAILWAY. APPLICATION FILED FEB. a. 1,901.

PATENTED OCT. 1, 1907.

0. H. SMITH. PLEASURE RAILWAY.

APPLICATION rum) FEB. s. 1907.

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N0.867,432. PATENTED 0011,1007.

G. H. SMITH.

1 PLEASURE RAILWAY. APPLICATION FILED FEB. 22, 1907.

No. 867,432. I Y PATENTBD OUT. 1, 1907.

G. H. SMITH.

PLEASURE RAILWAY. APPLICATION FILED PBB. e. 1907.

- 4 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

PLEASURE-RAILWAY.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 1, 1907.

Application filed February 8, 1907. Serial No. 366,302.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, CHARLES H. SMITH, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain 'new and useful Improvements in Pleasure-Railways,

of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to pleasure railways, and its object is to provide a construction improved with respect to the track upon which the cars travel, and also with respect to a water tank through which the cars travel under speed gained from their run around the track. The tank has illusi've features, as will hereinafter appear.

The cars proceed from a loading platform to an in clined track on which they are lifted to any height desired, and then they descend along a track having a circular or any other regular curve until they reach sufiicient speed to swing the cars out at an angle to the vertical, after which they continue around similar curves in the opposite direction until their tilt or swing is corrected and their inertia is almost nothing, and then they descend an incline which leads into a water tank, the water in which is very shallow in the passage-way, but much deeper at the sides. The water in the sides is inclosed by glass walls and will .be agitated, and the ends of the tank are closed by water curtains. The cars are pointed or shaped at the front to pass through the water. When open cars are used the nose and sides will be shaped to throw the water sidewise from the car. When closed cars are used the nose will be shaped to skim up a small amount of water, throwing it entirely over the car, giving the impression that it passed directly through the water.

The invention embodies the idea of running cars on a circular or other regular track and reversing the line of direction or curve when going at a speed sufiicient to throw the car out at a considerable angle to the vertical. This may be obtained by either a suspended car or a car otherwise supported on pivots or pivotal devices. Necessarily the course will have to be some constant curve, such as helix, cycloid, ellipse or circle, because an irregular curve would be unsafe.

An embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the drawings. a

Figure 1 is a plan view of one form, and Fig. 2 is a side elevation thereof. Figs. 3 and 4 are corresponding views of a modification. Fig. 5 is a detail in vertical cross section of the tank shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 6 is an enlarged view of the tank shown in Fig. 3. Fig. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of the tank shown in Fig. 6.

Referring specifically to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, 6 indicates a loading platform, from which an inclined track 7 proceeds upwardly to the top of a structure which supports an inner spiral track 8 and an outer spiral track 9, the direction of the spirals being reversed, and being connected by a loop 10 at the bottom. The

structure referred to consists of a central shaft or column 11 having radial arms 12 which are supported at or near their outer ends by uprights 13. The tracks 8 and 9 are mounted on the arms 12 and are supported thereby, the track 8 being inside the uprights 13 and the track 9 being outside the same. The arms are fastened to the central column and are properly positioned or placed to give the requisite or desired inclination to the tracks. The direction of travel on the spiral 8 is downwardly, and on the spiral 9 is upwardly, in the reverse direction, as stated, and the end of the spiral 9 connects to the downwardly inclined track 14 which leads to the water tank. This tank has at the sides compartments 15 for deep water, that is, the compartments are deep enough, or high enough, to extend above the car, and the walls 16 of the compartments are made of glass, or at least the inside wall is. The space or tank 17 between the compartments 16 contains shallow water, sufficient to cover the tracks, and be sprayed by the car as hereinafter described. Beyond the tank the track leads over a hump 18 and returns by means of a loop 19 to the loading platform 6, at Whicha stopping device may be provided if necessary. The track shown in these Figs. 1 and 2 is a double rail track on top of which the cars run. The cars preferably consist of a wheeled sub-structure 20 having a body 21 with seats, pivotally suspended at the ends upon standards 22 projecting from the sub-structure. This allows the body to swing out under centrifugal force. The front of the car is provided with a substantially V-shaped shield 23. When the car passes through the shallow water in the tank 17 the shield spreads the water in a spray on opposite sides of the same, and the passage of the water beside the same, in connection with the illusion produced by the water in the tanks 15, gives the effect of the'car passing through a solid body of water. Means are preferably provided to agitate the water in the tanks 16.

When the car descends the spiral 8 the effect is to swing the body outwardly in consequence of centrifugal force, and this swing is corrected by the reversal of the direction as the car passes upwardly around the reverse spiral 9, which is long enough to correct the swing as well as to substantially overcome the momentum of the car, after which it drops down the incline l4 and through the tank.

In the forms shown in Figs. 1 and 2 both the direct and reverse spirals are erected on one structure. In the forms shown in Figs. 3 and 4, the direct or downwardly inclined spiral track 8 is erected on a structure indicated at 24, and connects at the bottom to the reverse or upwardly inclined spiral 9 erected on a separate structure 25, leading finally to the tank and return loop as hereinbefore described. Also, the cars 26 shown in Figs. 3 and 4 are of the suspended type, traveling on a single rail over head. The cars shown are closed, and have at the front an inclined or tapered nose 27, which when it strikes the water in the tank 17, skims up the water and casts the same over the car, giving the effect of passing directly through the body of water.

The tank 17, or passage between the deep water compartments 15, is provided at the ends with water curtains indicated at 28, which may he produced by pipes 29 over head, with a film of water escaping therefrom.

The invention is not limited to the forms shown in the drawings, since the course of the track may be otherwise than circular as shown; also, the track or the parts thereof may he supported upon structures of different kind, or upon either the inner 01' the outer side of the uprights shown in the drawings. Thus, With respect to Figs. 1 and 2, the descending spiral may be on the outside and the ascending spiral on the inside; and similarly with respect to the form shown in Figs. 3 and 4.

I claim:

1. A railway having a track with a descending course curved in one direction with respect to the direction of travel, followed by an ascending course curved in the reverse direction, and inclined tracks leading respectively to and from the top of the respective courses.

2. A railway having a track with a descending spiral course curved in one direction with respect to the direc tion of travel, followed by an ascending spiral course curved in the reverse direction, and inclined tracks leading respectively to and from the top of the respective courses.

3. The combination with a railway having a descending course curved in one direction with respect to the direction of travel, followed by an ascending course curved in the reverse direction, and inclined tracks leading respectively to and from the top of the respective courses, of a car which travels on the track, the car having a swinging body which will swing out under centrifugal force as the car travels along the track.

4. The combination with a railway having a descending course curved in one direction with respect to the (lircction of travel, followed by an ascending course curred in the reverse direction, and inclined t' its leading re spectively to and from the top of the respective courses, of a car which travels on the track, the car having a truck which travels on the track, and a laterallyswiug iug body pivotally supported on the truck.

5. A railway comprising a supporting structure having a central column, uprights standing around the same, and diverging arms extending from the column to connection with the uprights, and an inclined track mounted on the arms and extending around the st ruetnre.

6. A railway comprising a supporting structure having a central column, diverging arms extending therefrom. uprights arranged around the column and supporting the outer ends of the arms, and a track having descending and ascending portions mounted on the arms and extend ing around the structure on opposite sides of the uprights respectively.

7. A railway comprising a supporting structure having a central column, diverging arms extending therefrom. uprights arranged around the column and supporting the outer ends of the arms, a track having descending and ascending portions mounted on the arms and extending around the structure on opposite sides of the uprights respectively, and a loop connecting said portions at the bottom, to reverse the direction of curvature S. lhe combination with a railwa track. ot a water tank having a portion containing shallow water through which the track passes, and deep portions on each side thereof, the latter having transparent walls through which the water therein is visihle from a car on the track.

9. The comhination with a railway track, of a water tank having a shallow portion through which the track passes, deep portions on each side thereof. the latter hav ing transparent walls through which the water thcrcin is visible from a car on the track, and water curtains across the track at each end of the tank.

In testimony whereof I have atlixed my signature. in presence of two witnesses.

CHARLES ll. SMI'III.

Witnesses Nrztmn l lmxrsimo, ll. G. livrcurulou.

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63G3/00