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Publication numberUS870993 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1907
Filing dateApr 4, 1907
Priority dateApr 4, 1907
Publication numberUS 870993 A, US 870993A, US-A-870993, US870993 A, US870993A
InventorsFred L Richardson
Original AssigneeFred L Richardson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe-protector for shoe-racks.
US 870993 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

FRED L. RICHARDSON, OF ROCKLAND, MASSACHUSETTS.

' SHOE-PROTECTOR FOR SHOE-RACKS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Y Patented Nov. 12, 1907.

Application filed April 4:. 1907. Serial No. 366,396.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRED L. RICHARDSON, a citizen of the United States, residing at Rockland, county of Plymouth, and State of Mafsachusetts, have invented an Improvement in Shoe-Protectors for Slice-Racks, of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawing, is a specification, like letters on the drawing representing like parts.

In the manufacture of shoes it is customary to transport the partly-finished shoes from one place in the factory to another in racks. During seme stages in the manufacture it is essential that the shoes in the rack should be kept entirely separate from each other because if they areV piled on top of each other or come in Contact With each other they are likely to become damaged. Accordingly it has grown to be more or less common practice in shoe factories to provide the racks with a plurality of ordinary paste-board boxes, each of which is adapted to contain a single shoe, these boxes operating to separate the shoes in the rack.

While paste-board boxes are effective so far as sepa- .rating individual shoes in the rack is concerned yet such boxes have the disadvantage that it is somewhat difficult to remove the shoes therefrom or replace them therein, and when the leather of the shoe is damp, as it is during some stages of the manufacture the shoes do not readily dry in the boxes owing to lack of ventilation.

It is the object f my invention to provide a novel form of shoe separator for shoe racks which is simple in construction and which will effectively accomplish the desired separation, and at the same time permit free circulation of air about the shoes while stored in the rack, so that the shoes will readily dry, and which has such a construction that the shoes may be readily placed therein or removed therefrom.

I Will first describe one embodiment of my invention and then point out the novel features thereof in the appended claims.

In the drawings, Figure l is a perspective view of a shoe rack such as used in factories showing how my improved shoe protector may be applied thereto; Fig, 2 is a perspective view of one of the shoe protectors.

My improved shoe protector has the bottom 3 provided with the side 4 rising therefrom, and preferably the two ends 5 and (i. The side 4 is of a sufficient height to properly separate the shoes placed in adjacent protectors while the ends 5 and 6 are much lower being preferably just suflicient to prevent the shoe from slipping off the ends of the holder.

In using my improved shoe protectors they are placed on the rack, as shown in Fig. l, that is, with the side 4 of cach protector adjacent to the open side of the adjacent protector so that the slde 4 of each protector lforms a division partition between adjacent shoes. When a series of these shoe prolcctors are arranged on thc rack l0, as shown in Fig. I a series of compartments are formed between the sides Al of the protectors, which compartments have comparatively low end walls so that the shoes may be readily placed between the partitions or removed therefrom.

lhe bottom 3 of each protector is preferably provided with Ventilating openings 7 so that a free circulation of air is afforded through the shoes in the rack l0. This is an important feature of the invention as it permits the shoes to dry readily after being placed in the rack.

In practice I prefer to reinforce he protector by corner stays 9 which are secured to both the ends 5 and 6 and the side 4.

The protecting device may be made of any suitable material although I prefer leather-board or some similar stiff material for this purpose. i

Having fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent ist- A shoe protector for shoe racks comprising a bottom member having Ventilating apertures therein, a side member rising.: from one side only thereof, and two cud mem` bers of less height than the side member.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

FRED L. RICHARDSON.

Witnesses z ALnnn'r O. SnLLMAN, Laurus S. MACDONALD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6948622 *Mar 12, 2003Sep 27, 2005Dsw Shoe Warehouse, Inc.Modular footwear display and storage system and method
US7168579Sep 5, 2003Jan 30, 2007Dci Marketing, Inc.Merchandising system
US7478732May 24, 2005Jan 20, 2009Dsw Shoe Warehouse, Inc.Modular footwear display and storage system and method
US7681744May 21, 2004Mar 23, 2010Dci Marketing, Inc.Merchandising system
US7681745Jan 29, 2007Mar 23, 2010Dci Marketing, Inc.Merchandising system
US7854333May 7, 2008Dec 21, 2010Dci Marketing, Inc.Rear loading gate for merchandising system
US8561819 *Jul 16, 2010Oct 22, 2013Johnny L. ScottStand for holding clothing accessories
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47F7/08, A47B61/04