Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS874514 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1907
Filing dateMay 31, 1907
Priority dateMay 31, 1907
Publication numberUS 874514 A, US 874514A, US-A-874514, US874514 A, US874514A
InventorsWesley F Lindow
Original AssigneeWesley F Lindow
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Joist-hanger.
US 874514 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED DEC. 24, 1907.

W. F. LINDOW.

JOIST HANGER. 1

APPLICATION FILED MAY 31, 1907.

WITNESSES:

THE NORRIS PETERS C0,, WASHINGTON; b.- c.

Corr

WESLEY F. LINDOW, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

J'OIST-HANGER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 24, 1907.

Application filed May 31, 1907. Serial No. 376,492.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, WESLEY F. LINDOW, a citizen of the United States of America, residing at Detroit, in the county of Wayne and State of Michigan, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in J oist- Hangers, of which the following is a specification, reference being had therein to the accompanying drawings.

In steel construction, it is essential that parts which are used in great quantities be produced with a minimum waste of material and expenditure of time and labor.

The invention relates to a beam stirrup or joist hanger, which is made without special or diflicult cutting of stock and which presents the necessary load sustaining properties although of simple design.

The invention consists in the matters hereinafter set forth, and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings, Figure 1 is a view in perspective of a hanger embodying the features of the invention. Fig. 2 is a plan view of'a blank from which the hanger is struck out. Fig. 3 is a bottom view of the hanger. Fig. 4 is a View in detail of a modified form of foot for the hanger.

In the drawings, 1 represents the body of the hanger, which, in the initial step of construction, consists of a rectangular sheet metal blank, centrally divided or slit for a portion of its length.

ody formed by the split or division are divergent, and the lateral marginal portions of the body are bent forward at right angles along parallel lines spaced at a width equal to or greater than the thickness of the joist for which the hanger is intended, to form flanges 3.

Where the angles or lines along which the flanges 3 are bent from the body, intersect the inner edges 4 of the divergent arms 2 and what may be termed the webs 5 of the arms 2 disappear, the arms are bent inwardly in a plane transverse to the plane of the body, and are secured together, thus forming a horizontal foot for the hangers. In the preferred form of construction these horizontal portions 6 of the arms overlapand extend across the foot of the hanger. Stiflening ribs 7 are formed up from the body of the metal in each arm and extend a short distance around the bend. Or the inturned ends of the arms may be brought into abutting relation, as in Fig. 4, and a rein- The arms 2 of the forcing plate 9 laid upon them, and riveted or otherwise fastened. A convenient method of securing the parts consists in striking out and bending up lugs 10 from the ends of the .arms, passing them through a suitable aperture 11 in the superimposed plate and upsetting and heading the lugs down. The uper portion of the body is turned back to form a hook, and this is likewise stifiened at the bend by one or more ribs 12 or the like struck out from the plate which may be situated, if desired, to give clearance for the end of the joist, the flanges 3 being preferably somewhat outwardly flared and disappearing into the horizontal web as they pass around the bend. By this method of construction, the tensile strength of the crosssection is preserved throughout the length of the hanger, while the material is so distributed as to afford the necessary resistance to sidewise strain. blank requires only a few steps or successive handlings, and the shape of the blank is such that it is sheared from stock with no waste.

What I claim as my invention is 1. A joist hanger formed of a rectangular blank of sheet metal which is centrally divided longitudinally for a portion of its length and spread into a pair of divergent arms whose outer marginal portions are bent forward at right angles on parallel lines which are continuations of the upper marginal lines of the blank, the flanges thus formed being inturned at right angles and secured together and the undivided part of the blank being bent back transversely at right angles.

2. A joist hanger formed of a rectangular blank of sheet metal which is divided at one end on its longitudinal axis for a portion of its length and spread into a pair of divergent arms whose outer marginal portions are bent forward at right angles on parallel lines which are continuations of the lateral marginal lines of the undivided portion of the blank, and inturned at right angles near their ends and secured together, the undivided part of the blank being bent back transversely at right angles.

3. A joist hanger formed of a rectangular blank of sheet metal which is centrally divided longitudinally for a portion of its length and spread into a pair of divergent arms whose outer marginal portions are bent forward at right angles on parallel lines which are continuations of the upper marginal lines of the blank, the flanges thus formed being inturned The formation from the at right angles and secured together and the undivided part of the blank being bent back transversely at right angles, and stiffening members formed up in the blank around the transverse bends.

4. A joist hanger comprising a vertically disposed sheet metal body whose lower portion is centrally divided and spread into a pair of divergent arms, whose lateral marginal portions are bent forward at right angles to the body for flanges thereto, on spaced parallel lines intersecting with the lines of the inner divergent margins, the flanges being horizontally inturned near the intersection of the lines and secured together, and the body being bent horizontally back near its upper end.

5. A joist hanger formed of a rectangular blank of sheet metal which is centrally divided longitudinally for a portion of its length and spread into a pair of divergent arms whose outer marginal portions are bent forward at right angles on parallel lines which are continuations of the upper marginal lines of the blank, the flanges thus formed being inturned at right angles below the point of disappearance of the web of each arm into its respective flange and secured together, and the undivided part of the blank being bent transversely at right angles.

6. A joist hanger formed of a rectangular blank of sheet metal which is centrally divided longitudinally for a portion of its length and spread into a pair of divergent arms whose outer marginal portions are bent at right angles on parallel lines which are continuations of the upper marginal lines of the blank, the flanges thus formed being inturned at right angles below the point of disappearance of the web of each arm into its respective flange and secured together, and the undivided part of the blank being bent transversely at right angles, and longitudinal stiffening ribs being struck up at the transverse bends of the body and flanges.

7. A joist hanger comprising a vertically disposed sheet metal body whose lower portion is centrally divided and spread into a pair of divergent arms, whose lateral marginal portions are bent forward at right angles to the body for flanges thereto, on spaced par allel lines intersecting with the lines of the inner divergent margins, the flanges being horizontally inturned near the intersection of the lines and secured together, and the body being bent horizontally back near its upper end, said body and flanges being provided at their transverse bends with longitudinal stiffening ribs struck up from the body.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

WESLEY F. LINDOW.

WVitnesses OTTo F. BARTHEL, C. R. STIoKNEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3011226 *Nov 23, 1960Dec 5, 1961Troy Steel CorpGusset plates
US3036347 *May 31, 1957May 29, 1962Easybow Engineering & Res CoJoist hanger
US3639942 *Dec 22, 1969Feb 8, 1972Keystone Consolidated Ind IncCaster bracket assembly
US3670360 *Jun 15, 1970Jun 20, 1972Roberts Consolidated IndCarpet binder bar
US4005942 *Mar 22, 1976Feb 1, 1977Simpson Manufacturing Co., Inc.Metal hanger
US4594017 *Jun 17, 1985Jun 10, 1986Altech Industries, Inc.Joist hanger and blank therefor
US4665672 *Mar 20, 1985May 19, 1987Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.One piece, non-welded holdown
US4825621 *Dec 10, 1987May 2, 1989Mitek Industries, Inc.Holddown
US5092096 *Dec 13, 1990Mar 3, 1992Cornell James CTemporary bridge joist support bracket
US5092097 *Sep 10, 1990Mar 3, 1992United Steel Products Co.Holddown connector
US5249404 *May 11, 1992Oct 5, 1993Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Holdown connection
US5367853 *Mar 5, 1993Nov 29, 1994Bryan; RobertPrefabricated deck system
US7533508 *Mar 12, 2002May 19, 2009The Steel Network, Inc.Connector for connecting building components
US8356449Oct 18, 2006Jan 22, 2013Jin-Jie LinFloor span connector
US8424250Oct 28, 2009Apr 23, 2013Building Performance Americas Ltd.Method and apparatus for retrofit connection of roof to wall
US8540201 *Mar 25, 2010Sep 24, 2013Playcore Wisconsin, Inc.Brackets and bracket system for assembling playground equipment
US8555580 *Dec 30, 2008Oct 15, 2013Simpson Strong-Tie Co., Inc.Multipurpose holdown
US9206594Sep 4, 2014Dec 8, 2015Columbia Insurance CompanyHanger with locator tooth
US20060213136 *Mar 25, 2005Sep 28, 2006Jin-Jie LinHoldown with reinforced back
US20080286038 *May 15, 2007Nov 20, 2008Ogden Stephen FRetrofitting apparatus for reinforcement of roof frame structure
US20100043310 *Oct 28, 2009Feb 25, 2010Platts Robert EMethod and apparatus for retrofit connection of roof to wall
US20100088997 *Oct 18, 2006Apr 15, 2010Jin-Jie LinFloor span connector
US20100243831 *Mar 25, 2010Sep 30, 2010Scott GaddBrackets and Bracket System for Assembling Playground Equipment
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF16B7/0446