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Publication numberUS875699 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1908
Filing dateJun 20, 1907
Priority dateJun 20, 1907
Publication numberUS 875699 A, US 875699A, US-A-875699, US875699 A, US875699A
InventorsPaul Thomas Concord Dumais
Original AssigneePaul Thomas Concord Dumais
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reinforced composite structure.
US 875699 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Witnuoeo M.. M m m PATUNTUU JAN. 7, 190C. T. T. C. UUMATS. 'RUTNTOUCUU COU/TPCSTTTJ STRUCTURE.

APPLICATION ILUD JUNE zo 1907.

- I a SHEETS-SHEET 2.

No. 875,699. PATENTED JAN. '7, 1908'.

` ,E Tl C. DUMAIS.

REINPORGED COMPOSITE STRUCTURE.

APPLIOATION FILED JUNE 20, 1907.

` 3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

YAUL THOMAS CONCORD DUMAIS, OF HULL, QUEBEC, CANADA.

REINFORCED COMPOSITE STRUCTURE.

Specification of Letters atent.

Patented Jan. 7, 1908.

lApplication filed June 20. 1907. Serial No. 379.841.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that i, PAUL TnoMAs CON- conD DUMAIs, a subject of the King of Great lrltain, residing at Hull, county of Ottawa, 1n the Province of Quebec, Canada, have invented certain new and useful improvements in Reinforced vComposite Structures; and .l do hereby declare that the following, is a full, clear, and exact description of the`invention, such as Will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

My invention relates to improvements in reinforced composite structures, and it consis'ts in the constructions, combinations and arrangements herein ldescribed and claimed.

My invention is primarily intended for the construction of Wharves, breakwat-ers, collierdams, and all structures which are more or lessirnmersed and subjected to the action of water.

My invention is especially adapted for floating` crib Works 'which are sunk to position on proper foundations after beine completed. i

In theraccompany' ig d raivings forming a part Of this application and in which similar reference symbols indicate corrospomling parts in the several views- Figure l is a perspective vieni, partly broken away, illustratinol a partially completed floating crib employed in the con# struction of a bridgepier; Fir. 3 shows the iloating crib completed to constitute the finished pier, and ready for sinking on to its foundation; Fig'. 3 is a detail sectional view through one oi ythe composite walls of the crib'work; Fig. 4is a vertical sectional View,

on the line amil of Fig. T, illustrating the rctainingr wall of a wharf constructed according to my invention; Fir. is a detail sectional view on a linger scale', ol' theI bottom ol' the outer Wall shown in Fig'. el; Fir. lj is a sectional View on the lini` 6-G of Fig. 7 and Fig. 7 is a front elevation of a wharf construction shown in Fins. 4, 5 and 6.

Figs. i to oi the drawings sho'n a buoyant platform comprising' a series of longitudinal timbers l, which are strongly secured on transverse beanis Z and provided with a Water tlght flooring of boards 3 and Li. The flooringr can be formed Water tight in any usuallnianner but ,l have found it advantageous to emploj,l a doublf` llooring with interposed inipervious material, such as tarred paper. In such construction, isecure both layers of the double flooring with their boards parallel and extending transversely across the longitudinal timbers l, With tarred a per interposed and the boards of the upper ayer breaking joint With those of the lower layer. This insures a Water tight construction, and has roven greatly superior in practice to tl e olii forms of double, Hooring in which the boards of the respective layers are laid angularly, so that the joints of each layer cross those o f theother.

In the construction of the composite superstructure, the buoyant platform is vfloated to convenient location for operation, and. a bed of concrete laid on the water tight Ilooringl The monolithic walls of the crib Work are progressively buiit up on the concrete bed; a

)referred means for progressively constructmg the walls is disclosed-andclaimed in an application for Letters .Patent filed by me simultaneously with this `application. The crib work may be secured to the platform by suitable bolts extending through the bed of concrete; or the bed of concrete may be omitted and the Walls of the crib Work secured directly on tlie"'lloating platform. The crib work is constructed with water tight outer walls 5 provided with inlets 6, which are controlled by valves in a manner similar to that shown in Fig. 5;

As the superstructure is progressively built up, the Weight thereof lwill act to further and further increase the depth of submergence of the platform and superstructure, as shown by the position of the Water linc indicated in Figs. l and 3.

After the superstructure has been completed to the desired extent, the entire structure is lloatrd or towed to position and the valved inlet (i opened to admit the Water of llotatiou for sinking thel structure on to a suitable foumlation which can have been previously prepared. Under certain conditions, the entire suiwrstructure can vbe completed, as shown in l `ig. il, before towing thelloating structure to its desired position; in other cases, the available depth of water of flotation, and other conditions, may make it advisable to tow the lloating structure to posi tion before it is fully completed.

After the structure has been sunk to tion on its foundation, the valves are c osed and the interior oi the crib work filled With any suitable material, such as crushed stone or loose rock filling. l have found in practice that a filling,` of earth or sand insures osilOO

greater Weight and stability than crushed stone. A cubic foot of solid limestone weighs approximately 168 lbs., and a cubic foot of crushed limestone Weighs approximately 89 lbs., While a cubic foot of earth will average about 110 lbs. that is an excess weight of 21 lbs. per cubic foot in favor of the earth filling. The earth or sand employed for filling can usually be dredged in the immediate vicinity of the structure, and can always be obtained at a lnuch less expense than the cost of crushed rock. In the existing forms of timber crib Work, earth or sand has not been available as a filling, since itv would rapidly Wash out through the joints and interstices.

As shown 1n the dra-mugs, l provide the structure with a sheathing, or apron, 7 of concrete or cement for protecting the sides of the buoyant platform wherever the latter would be. subjected to attacks of toredo, or other destructive..agencies. This sheathing isformed directly on the sides of the platform, and is integral with the concrete walls of the superstructure, to which it can bc strongly secured by reinforcing tie members embedded therein, as shown especiallyin Fig. 5. In practice, it has proven very advantageous to fill thecrib Work by the usual form of suction dredge. The discharge pipe of the dredge is arranged to discharge in the top of the crib `Work; the dredging material settling to the bottom by its greater weight and the Water intermixed with. said material finally overiiowing from the top of the crib Work.

Figs. 4 to 7 illustrate the `application of my invention to the retaining Wall of a Wharf, or similar structure, A timber platform, comprising beams 8 and 9 and a double. flooring 10, similar to that previously described,ris shown With a thin bed of rigid cement 11 laid on said viiooring and integral With the progressively built up Walls of the reinforcing concrete superstructure. Reinforcing tie rods 12 and 13 are shown em- Vbedded in theV concrete Walls and secured,

- respectively, to the timbers and oorings of of valves 17 at their inner ends.

Walls are progressively built up, uiding andA the platform;tliereby securely anchoring said Walls in position. A concrete, or cement, sheathing 14 is provided for the walls of the timber platform which are exposed to the Water. The sheathing '14 is formed integral With the Wallsv of the superstructure, and is firmly lsecured in position by reinforcing tie rods embedded in the lsheathing and extending Within said walls. Inlet open-ings 16 are formed in the lower portion of the outer Walls of the superstructure during the progressive building up of the latter, and are provided with any suitable vform As the retaining staples 18 are embed ed therein for receiving the'el'ongated stem 19 of the valve 17; such elongated stem being conveniently formed byl successively adding additional lengths thereto as the wall increases in height. A hand wheel 20, secured to the upper end of the valve stem, provides convenient means for actuating the valve 17 to control theinlcts 16 after the structure is in place on its foundation. -Free rotation 'of the valve stem is provided for by universal joints 24 placed in said stem at any points in which its direction changes. I have shown a foundation comprising a bed Of rock 21 with a-surface of crushed stone '22; loose stone being piled on thel Water side of the retaining walls to embed the shields 14 and protect the timberplatform. Theabove described retaining walls are preferably contructcd, placed in position, and filled in a manner similar to that previously described in reference to the pier construction.

During the progressive buildingup of the structure, reinforcing rods are embedded in the Walls therein, as shown in the drawings. The outer walls are reinforced throughout their height b v overlapping series of metaly In locations in Which the beds for receiving the retaining walls are not submerged, it Willl be obvious that the timber latform and vIlooring can be dispensed With. constructions, the bed will be leveled off, or built up with concrete, to provide a suitable foundation, .and the Walls of the superstructure progressively built up to constitute a 'monolithic structure With said foundation 1. In composite cribWork, the combination of a base, a monolithic superstructure In such comprising outer walls and inner connecting Walls progressively built up from said base,

and reinforcing rods embedded in said superstructure and extending 1n said base to con stitute anchors for, said Walls, substantially as described.

2. In composite crib Work, the combination of.l a base, a monolithic ,superstructure comprising outer Walls and inner connecting Walls progressively built up from 'said base,

Y' tially as described.

vflooring, vsaid lcomprising water-tight outer walls progres' stantially as described.l

the rods ofthe lower series extending within the base to anchor the walls thereto, sub

3. IIn composite crib work', the combination of a base, a monolithic superstructure" l walls, substantially vertical reinforcing memprogressively built up from said base and comprisin outer walls and inner connecting walls sub( ividmg the interior of said superstructure' into a series of com artments,

metal reinforcing bands embed ed in said superstructure and extending Aaround the walls of said4 several compartments, and reinforcing rods embedded-in the outer walls of said superstructure and extending in-the base to anchor said walls thereto, substan- 4. In composite crib work, the combination" of a water tight' base, a monolithic superstructure integral with said base and comprising water tight outer wallsprogressively built up from said base and provided with 'inlet o enmgs in. their lower portions, valves contro ling said inlets, mamially-operated means supported by said outer walls for acn tuatingsaid valves,-and means for extending said manually-operated means along said walls as the latter are progressively built up, substantially as described.

5. In composite crib work, the combination of a buoyant water-tight flooring, a monolithic superstructure secured to said monolithic superstructure sively built up from said flooring, valved inlets extending through the lower portions of said outer walls, manually-operated means supported by said outer walls for controlling said valved inlets, and means for extending' said manually operated means along said walls as the latter are progressively built up, substantially as described.

6. In-composite crib work, the combination of a buoyant water-tight flooring, a monolithic superstructure secured to said flooring, said monolithic superstructure comprising water-tight outer walls progressively built` up from said 4flooring and connecting inner walls formed'integral with said outer walls during the progressive building up of the latter, valved inlets extending through the lower portions of 'said outer walls, manually operatedy means supported by said outer -said manually operated 7. In composite crib work, the combination of a water-tight flooring buoyant of itself, a monolithic superstructure comprising water-tight outer walls and connecting inner walls progressively built up from said flooring, substantially horizontal reinforcing members embedded m' said-outer and lnner bers extending through the progressively built `u portions of said outer walls, and manual y operated means for admittin water through the lower portions of said outer walls, substantially as described.

8. .In composite crib work, the combination of a water-tight flooring, a monolithic superstructure comprising water-tight outer walls and connecting inner wallsprogressively built up from said flooring, substantially horizontal reinforcing members embedded in said outer and inner walls, substantially vertical reinforcing members extending through the progressively br up portions of said outer walls, valved inlets ex tending through the lower portions ofsaid outer walls, inanilally-operated means supported by said outer walls for controlling said valved inlets, and means for extendin(y means along said walls as the latter are progressively built u from the flooring, substantially as describe 9. In composite crib work, the combination of a water-tight flooring, a monolithic superstructure comprising concrete walls progressively built up on said water-tight flooring, reinforcing members embedded in' said concrete walls and anchored to said flooring, a sheathing of concrete on the edges of said water-tight flooring, and reinforcing members embedded in said concrete sheathing and extending within said concrete walls for Yfirmly supporting said sheathing in place, substantially as described.

10. In composite crib work, the combina-4 tion of a water-tight flooring, a1 monolithic superstructure comprising concrete walls progressively built up on said water-tight flooring, reinforcing members embedded in said concrete walls and anchored to said flooring, and a sheathing of concrete extending about the edges of said water-tight flooring and overlapping said monolithic Vwalls for shielding said flooring when in position, substantially as described.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand in the presence of two witnesses.

PAUL THOMAS CONCORD DUMAIS.

Witnesses:

A. BRAY,

I. A. CHAss.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2472869 *Feb 24, 1947Jun 14, 1949Richfield Oil CorpIsland for well drilling
US2865179 *Sep 28, 1953Dec 23, 1958Shell DevOffshore drilling structure
US2966778 *Sep 8, 1953Jan 3, 1961Frederic R Harris IncCaissons for wharf construction and method of installing same
US3889476 *Feb 2, 1973Jun 17, 1975Gerin GeraldSubmersible caissons and their applications
US3969900 *Aug 29, 1974Jul 20, 1976Raymond International, Inc.Breakwater construction
US4293240 *Sep 27, 1979Oct 6, 1981Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki KaishaMethod for installing an electric power plant
US4511288 *Nov 22, 1982Apr 16, 1985Global Marine Inc.Modular island drilling system
US5049004 *Jan 19, 1990Sep 17, 1991Masateru NiimuraUnderwater building and constructing method thereof
US5284402 *Feb 16, 1993Feb 8, 1994Del Villar Antonio CSystem for the manufacture and installation of selective intake towers in reservoirs
WO1984002151A1 *Nov 22, 1983Jun 7, 1984Global Marine IncModular island drilling system
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE02B17/00