Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS879654 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1908
Filing dateNov 29, 1907
Priority dateNov 29, 1907
Publication numberUS 879654 A, US 879654A, US-A-879654, US879654 A, US879654A
InventorsFrederick E Kohler
Original AssigneeFrederick E Kohler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Embroidery-hoop.
US 879654 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED FEB. is, 1908.

F. E. KOHLER.

EMBROIDERY HOOP.

APPLICATION FILED NOV.29,1907.

2& v .2 WW 6 i amen/tow FMSMZBJCOM F 9.4 AMA-Q FREDERICK E. KOHLER, OF CANTON, OHIO.

EMBROIDERY-HOOP.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 18, 1908 Application filed November 29.1907. Serial No. 404-206.

To all whom it may concern: I

Be it known that I, FREDERICK E. KoH- LER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Canton, in the county of Stark and State of Ohio, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Embroidery Hoops, of which the following is a specification.

The invention relates to a hoop composed of two rings, one adapted to telescope loosely outside the other for the purpose of holding a piece of fabric taut over the inner ring for conveniently embroidering the same. When the rings are made entirely out of wood or other IQlKtiX GlY hard and smooth material, and no means are provided for a change in the diameter of either ring, such hoop is not well adapted to hold fabrics of different thicknesses and consistencies; and for the purpose of increasing the resilience and frictionof the holding surfaces, a rubber band has been wrapped around or applied longitudinally along the holding surface of one or both of the rings, and a flexible fibrous band or cord has also been partially countersunk in the same. Serious objections pertain to each of these appliances. When a rubber band is wrapped around a ring, it makes the hoop quite cumbersome and takes away the neat and light condition so desirable in a hoop of this character, and the band is apt to wear off atthe edges of the ring and requires requen't renewal. When a band of soft rubber is applied longitudinally along the flat surface of the'ring, the edges become loosened from the wood b use and stretch or fold out of place, and t e hoop soon-loses its efficiency. And finally, when a resilient frictional band or cord is artially countersunk in the face of the ring, the hoo soon becomes ineilicient by reason 'of the orc inary wear and use which either abrades the protruding portion of the countersunk material down to the plane of the hard body of the ring, or overcomes the resi-lientqualities of the frictional material and compresses it entirely into the countersinl'r in the ring; and furthermore, when a band is countersunk, unless and until the protruding edges of the same are worn oil by the abrasion of use, they-are. a tto be loosened and either stretched or fol ed out of place like the edges of a band which is merely laid on a fiat surface.

The object of the present invention is to overcome each and all of the objections whichhave been noted as'pertainin to the devices which have been employs to increase the resilience and friction of the holding surfaces of the rin s, and this object is attained by forming at east one ring, preferably the inner ring, with the middle portion of its holding surface crowned or raised outside the plane of the remaining edges thereof, with the sides, of the raised portion rounded; and then by luing or otherwise securely attaching a resi ient frictional band, preferably of somewhat soft andpliableleather, on the crowned or raised portion of the ring, with the edges of the band extended over the rounded sides of the raised portion and abutted against the flat portions of the ring; as illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which Figure l is a perspective view of the improved inner ring showing the resilient frictional band applied thereon; Fig. 2, an axialsectional View showing the fabric laid over the inner ring and the outer ring in position for telescoping over -the same; Fig. 3, a similar view showing the outer ring telescoped over the inner, ring with the fabric stretched and held taut over the inner ring; and Fig. 4, an enlarged sectional view of the inner ring showing the details of construction.

Similar numerals refer to similar throughout the drawing.

The inner ring 1 ismade of wood, hard rubber or other relatively hard material, and is formed with the raised portion 2 in the middle part of its periphery. The raised portion, as shown, extends over the greater part of the width of the ringand is referably formed flat so that when the eather band 3 is glued or otherwise attached thereon the fiat surface '4 is presented to the inner face of the outer ring 5. Y The sides of the raised portion are rounded as at 6, and the parts edges 7 of the leather band are curved over these rounded sides of the raised portion and abutted against the comparatively narrow faces 8 formed along the respective edges of the ring. The'outer rin 5 is likewise made of wood or other suitab e material, and as .shown; is preferably formed with 1ts inner face 9 smooth or fiat, excepting only as the corners 10 may be slightly chamfered or rounded, and when'the fabric 11 is placed over the inner ring, as shown in Fig. 2, the outer rin is placed over and then forced downward around the inner ring, which stretches and holds the fabric taut over the inner ring. The resilience and friction of the leather band on the inner ring serves to give a resisting pressure against the outer rmg,

J and to prevent a slipping of the fabric as tion, theseedges will be protected fromany having rings of unvarying circumferences.

contact which will tend to loosen or detach them-from the ring. It is also evident that the leather band will continue to beeffective until it is worn entirely off the ring, for its edges are protected against being loosened from the'ring, and there is no countersink inthe ring into which the leather can be compressed. I

It will be understood that the exact form and sha e of the raised portion of the inner hoop w ich is herein illustrated and de scribed is not essential to the general idea of theinvention; excepting only that the sides must be sufficiently rounded or beveled to form an angle with the flat faces on the edges of the hoop, int which angle the edges of the leather band ar adapted to be abutted; and it will also be understood the invention is not limited in scope to the use of leather as the material for the resilient frictional band, nor to the application of the invention to hoops What I claim as my invention, and desire tcrsecure by Letters Patent, is

1. An embroidery hoop comprising two rings one adapted to telescope within the v other, one of the rings having a raised portion with rounded sides on its holding face, and a leather band attached on the raised portion and having its edges curved over and abutted in the angles of the rounded sides.

2. An embroidery hoop comprising two rings one adapted to telescope within the other, one of the rings having a I:1.iS(i-P0l strain, but nevertheiess.

. rounded sides.

' 3. A ring for an raised portion with rounded sides on its ho d ing face, and a leather band attached on the raised portion and having its edges curved over and abutted in the angles of the rounded sides.

' 4. A ring for an embroidery hoop havin a raised portion with rounded sides on its ho ding face, and a resilient frictional band on the raised portion and having its edges curved over and abutted in the angles of the rounded sides.

' 5. An embroidery hoop comprising tworings one adapted to telescope within the other, one of the rings having a raised portion on its holding face, and a leather band attached on the raised portion and having its edges extended over and abutted in the angles of the sides thereof.

6. An embroidery hoop comprising two rings one adapted to telescope within the other, one of the rings having a. raised portion on its holding face, and a resilient frictional band attached on the raised portion and having its edges extended over and abutted in the angles of the sides thereof.

7. A ring for an embroidery hoop having a raised portion on its holding face, and a leather band attached on the raised portion and having its edges extended over and abutted in the angles of the sides thereof.

8. A ring for an embroidery hoop having a raised portion on its holding face, and a resilient frictional band on the raised portion and having its edges extended over and abutted in the angles of the sides thereof.

FREDERICK E. KOHLER.

Witnesses:

MARY A. CAVANAUGHP HARRY FREASE.

embroidery hoop havin a

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4658522 *Feb 28, 1986Apr 21, 1987Kramer Monta LFrame for tensioning and supporting textiles for needlework
US5555653 *Oct 20, 1995Sep 17, 1996Morgan; Robert E.For securing material
US5722191 *Jul 11, 1996Mar 3, 1998Morgan; Robert ElliottCraft hoop assembly with gripping surface
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD05C1/04