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Publication numberUS882710 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1908
Filing dateApr 3, 1907
Priority dateApr 3, 1907
Publication numberUS 882710 A, US 882710A, US-A-882710, US882710 A, US882710A
InventorsGeorge Frank E Pearsall
Original AssigneeGeorge Frank E Pearsall
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Border for pictures.
US 882710 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED MAR. 24, 1908.

G. F. B. PBARSALL.

BORDER FOR PICTURES. urmonlon'nnnn APR. 3, 19m.

W tint $10,! lif, Q u/wed.

THE NORRIS PETKRS cm, WASHINGTON, D. c.

GEORGE FRANK E. PEAR PATENT OFFICE.

SALL, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

BORDER FOR PICTURES.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, GEORGE FRANK E. PEARSALL, a citizen of the United States, residing at the borough of Brooklyn, in the city of N ew York, county of Kings, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Borders for Pictures, of which the following is a full, clear, and eXact specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings and to the letters of reference marked thereon.

My invention has relation to borders for pictures, especially photographs, lithographs and prints, but it is applicable in connection with other pictures of artistic value.

Heretofore borders for pictures have been employed in flat or other forms and in various single tones but with no proper relation to the tones in the picture, forming only a line of demarcation between the picture and its mat but not otherwise serving to alter the general appearance or eifect.

The object of my invention is to produce a border for the picture which shall be simple and easy to make and apply and which shall enhance the appearance of the picture, not only as an artistic whole but in reference to the details or features, making the latter and the whole to appear prominent by reason of abrupt but pleasing contrasts, and to stand out, as it is said.

To accomplish all of the above named objects and to secure other and further advantages in the matters of construction, appli cation and purpose or effect, my invention involves the formation of the border from a portion of the picture itself and of the mate rial on which the latter is produced and the application of the border so formed in a reversed position with respect to the lights and shades, as will be hereinafter more fully eX- plained and then pointed out in the claims. I In the accompanying drawings forming part of this specification, Figure 1 is a front view of a picture mounted upon a mat and supplied with a border constructed and ar ranged after the manner of my invention. Fig. 2 is a front view of the picture alone, the dotted-line indicating the line along which the picture may be cut to separate the border therefrom. Fig. 3 is a front view of the border after it has been separated from the picture.

In all these figures like letters of reference wherever thev occur. indicate corresponding parts Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed April 3,

Patented March 24, 1908.

1907. Serial No. 366,069.

A represents any picture to be bordered and mounted. This may be of any kind as before indicated, but it should be understood that the greater the value of the picture as an artistic production the better will be the effect of the improved border thereon. The details of the picture are of no consequence in this connection. It is well understood that the greater the contrast between the lightest light and the deepest dark, the more prominent the picture will appear.

Taking a picture of oval form, as indicated in Fig. 2, I cut therefrom a comparatively narrow border, represented at B, and I apply this around the central part of the picture, but upside down with respect thereto as indicated at Fig. 1. The light and shade in the border thus cut correspond in position accurately with the light and shade of the picture, and by reversing the border upon the picture the deepest dark of the border is brought into juxtaposition with the lightest light of the picture, and the lightest light with the deepest dark. Thus the border is made to afford an abrupt but pleasing contrast all around the bordered picture, and the effect of this is to make the picture prominent as a whole and in its several details.

The bordered. picture is intended to be mounted on any form of mat, as C, for the usual purposes. One of the advantages of the invention is that any mat which will harmonize with the picture must also harmonize with the border, which is seldom possible with the borders as heretofore constructed. With the improved border there is no necessity of selecting any particular color or any location of the colored parts to harmonize with the colors of the picture, for these features are, as it were, mechanically and accurately'adjusted in reference to each particular picture. The height of contrast between the border and the picture is most apparent in cases in which the picture involves but two tones. The arrangement of the masses of light and dark in a picture is now called the notan but sometimes the spotting; and we have pictures of which the notan is of two tones, or of three, or even more tones. The application of the invention is equally beneficial in either of these cases, for, by reversing the border, which has the same notan as the picture, the highest light and the deepest dark of the one, as also the intermediate tones, are suitably and artistically contrasted and arranged. The border may of course be of any desired width, but if made too wide it would of course detract from the artistic appearance of the whole as a bordered picture, the eye then seizing the notan of the border rather than that of the picture itself.

It will be apparent from the foregoing eX- planations that the invention is especially applicable in connection with pho to-p ortraits.

It is not necessary that the picture and its border should be of oval form, though that form has been selected for illustration in the drawings. They may be of circular or other symmetrical form, it being only necessary that the notan of the border may be reversed with respect to that of the picture.

Having thus fully described my invention what I claim as new herein and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. The combination of a picture and a border therefor, the said border having the same tones and notan as said picture and ap plied around the latter with its light portion and dark portion reversed relatively thereto.

2. The combination of a picture, a border therefor, and a mat, the said border having the same tones and notan as said picture and applied around the latter with its light portion and dark portion reversed relatively thereto, said picture and border being mounted on said mat.

In testimony that I claim the invention above set forth I affix my signature, in presence of two Witnesses.

G. FRANK E. PEARSALL.

Witnesses:

F. J. GREENE, CHARLES R. SEARLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3178844 *May 6, 1963Apr 20, 1965Christian Fay FIllusion type picture mounting
US3226867 *Mar 18, 1963Jan 4, 1966Newton Jr Tracy SFraming for two dimensional pictorial material
US7188780Jun 30, 2004Mar 13, 2007S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Volatile material expiration indicating system
US7213770Jun 30, 2004May 8, 2007S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Volatile material dispensing system
US7426799Jan 23, 2006Sep 23, 2008S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Air freshener with frame and refill holder
US7441360Mar 31, 2006Oct 28, 2008S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Air freshener with picture frame
US7523577Apr 3, 2006Apr 28, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Air freshener with holder
US7607250Apr 29, 2005Oct 27, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Air freshener with picture frame
US7665238Jun 22, 2007Feb 23, 2010S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Air freshener with holder
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47G1/06